Ben Moore Aura Paints????


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Old 08-09-07, 04:14 AM
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Question Ben Moore Aura Paints????

I am about to have my basement painted. I want to use a low Voc paint due to children in the home. My Ben Moore paint store told me that I can use Aura paints. We are going to use a very light color.

I have mainly pre-exsisting sheetrock with an off white color and I also have some new sheetrock with spackle that has been sanded smooth.

My paint store told me I do NOT have to prime. Just use 2 coats of the Aura paint over new and existing sheetrock and it will be fine.

Is this ok or should I prime the room first. I am a little leery of not priming but obviously would rather not if what my dealer is telling me is true.
 
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Old 08-09-07, 05:51 AM
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It is always better to prime anything new. primer does a better job of sealing repairs and the new drywall. I don't know if there are any low VOC primers available.

I'm not familiar with the Aura line but most latex paints can be used over raw dryall without a primer - it just doesn't make for the best job. Generally paint over primer will both look and wear/clean better than without a primer being used.
 
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Old 08-09-07, 08:54 AM
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I always prime anything inconsistent - in your case you have paint, bare sheetrock and joint compound. You'll get a better finished product, IMO, if you seal all of these different surfaces with primer, otherwise they will absorb the paint at different rates.
 
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Old 08-09-07, 05:08 PM
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New No Prime Paint

The Aura is new
To new for me to have even tried it yet
Though I have friends that did testing and focus groups for it
Although they were impressed, it's going to take an awful lot of impressing for me & my colleagues to skip a step like priming, that's been ingrained in us as vital since we started
It doesn't help when we see so many failures due to people thinking they don't need to prime
It's our names on the line, we don't take that lightly

Yes, Ben Moore put a lot into this product
But I'd be hesitant about skipping priming also
 
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Old 08-09-07, 07:36 PM
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SW has a low VOC primer in the Harmony line. It was originally designed for use in the healthcare environment (nursing homes, hospitals...) because as stated, primer shouldn't be forgotten.
 
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Old 01-11-08, 08:30 PM
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I realize that this is thread is a few months old, but I was wondering if anyone has additional feedback on BM's Aura line.

Thanks
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:03 AM
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Yes
Since I posted my reply, I have used Aura on several projects
Although it is not a true "one coat" paint (there is no such thing), it is pretty mind boggling how well it covers

I'd say for most cases, if the job needs a coat f primer and two coats paint, with Aura it'll take two coats
If it's normally a two coat color change re-paint, it'll only take one coat Aura
Massive color changes will need two coats, but you'll skip the primer usually needed
Some medium color changes are on the line between one coat and two coats of Aura

Fresh drywall there is no need for primer!
This stuff sticks like glue and covers like a blanket

No need to primer drywall repairs either
It killed me to test that the first time, not priming a repair area, but the Aura went on great w/no flashing...even with one coat eggshell

It also drys in less than an hour, so you can push more work into one day
....and it doesn't stink, there's virtually no smell

Also, it is extremely washable (even the flat/matte), and burnish resistant (rub marks)
It touches up like a dream, even in eggshell

And the finish is spectacular

It takes a little learning curve, as it drys so fast, and can get drippy if applied to heavy
But all in all, a spectacular product that saves time (less time painting) and money (less paint/primer/sundries product to buy)
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:26 AM
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That certainly sounds like an impressive product!

However, from your description, it may not be appropriate for a slow-working DIY if it dries in an hour... Do you think it would be possible for a DIY to maintain a good wet edge without constantly switching between brush and roller?

SirWired
 
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Old 01-12-08, 07:02 AM
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I would always prime. The finish coat should see a uniform surface. Spot priming will not give you this. I would prime it all. But next is spot priming to seal all new drywall and joint compound. Lighting will determine if you see flashing after the paint cures. In a basement this is not to much a concern.

I just did a condo using Aura in one room. All the other rooms I used Sherwin Williams Duration Home. Both were Matte finish. I much prefer the Duration. Duration is a bit better washing off a mark or stain then the Aura. The Duration rolls out easier then Aura. BUT...As much as I am a fan of SW paints, the smell is stronger. The Ben Moore had a less atrusive oder. I never tried the SW Harmony before. If this room is going to get a lot of abuse, I would go for the SW Duration. Best washing latex I ever used.

 
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Old 01-12-08, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by sirwired View Post
However, from your description, it may not be appropriate for a slow-working DIY if it dries in an hour... Do you think it would be possible for a DIY to maintain a good wet edge without constantly switching between brush and roller?
Good point, you'd think so, but you would be incorrect as to DIYer friendly-ness
It's hard to explain, but DIYers actually have a better time adjusting to this stuff
Pros have had certain rules to get that premium paint job, that simply don't apply with this stuff
The Pro has to think outside the box
The DIYer was never in the box

One of those things is you really don't have to worry about a wet edge
In fact, you should cut in the whole room first (which is a common DIY mistake for most paints), then roll the whole room

Rather then going back over a holiday while it's still wet, wait until you're done, then touch up...even with eggshell
...another common DIY mistake with most paints, that actually works better with Aura

There's a few more, I should probably write them up and post them
But in general, DIYers have actually had more of an easy time with this stuff

...for the walls, trim and flat doors anyway
It seems things like 6 panel doors can be an issue
So far the only thing for those I can suggest is you better be good and fast with the brushwork
I would not recommend a DIYer tackle those
But I haven't had enough time with those to come up with any good suggestions for those at this point

Other than that, go for it
 
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Old 01-12-08, 03:50 PM
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The reason I resurrected this thread is that I was wondering about the appropriateness of Aura in a basement bathroom.

I started another thread on this issue, and some of the responders to that thread have responded to this one.

So, to anyone who has used Aura (or knows enough about Aura to respond):

Does the Aura in a matte finish have a place in a secondary bathroom with a shower?

The color will be in the off-white family, so I don't think I will realize the color benefits of Aura. But what about how it stands up to an occasionally moist environment?
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:16 PM
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I have never tried Aura in a bathroom. Matte finish will work out fine. But unless someone out there has tried Aura under bathroom condensation conditions with great results, I would not do it. There are a lot of paints that say mildew resistant, or good also for kitchen and bathrooms etc. I have seen those do less then great in a humid bathroom. I assume the ceiling is not 8 feet high and very large with good ventilation. These conditions are usually ok for any paint. But like i wrote in the other thread, SW Bathroom paint will hold up.
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift View Post

Fresh drywall there is no need for primer!
This stuff sticks like glue and covers like a blanket

No need to primer drywall repairs either
It killed me to test that the first time, not priming a repair area, but the Aura went on great w/no flashing...even with one coat eggshell
This is hard for me to believe. Even in a hallway with a good amount of light at the end of the hallway? Have you seen the job after the paint cures? That would be an amazing paint. Does the label say primer is not needed?
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by GaetanoL View Post
...I was wondering about the appropriateness of Aura in a basement bathroom.

...to anyone who has used Aura (or knows enough about Aura to respond):

Does the Aura in a matte finish have a place in a secondary bathroom with a shower?

...what about how it stands up to an occasionally moist environment?
I can not say how it holds up in extreme humidity from a personal standpoint, as I have not yet had the chance to test this myself
But I can say that reports from my contemporaries are so far excellent and encouraging, with no wall sweats or surfactant leaching that can occur under extreme humid conditions, especially in the darker colors, and even sometimes with K & B paints
(though I should add 'thus far' as it's still a pretty new paint)

I have been anxious to test this out myself, and would not hesitate to do so, or to recommend to do so based on these reports
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by nagra4s View Post
This is hard for me to believe. Even in a hallway with a good amount of light at the end of the hallway? Have you seen the job after the paint cures? That would be an amazing paint. Does the label say primer is not needed?
It's quite remarkable
I did not believe it would do that
If you read my first post in this thread, I was quite skeptical of the "no primer"
After seeing how well it did on bare drywall, I did my own testing on drywall repair areas in the field
As this stuff touches up like a dream, I had only a little hesitation testing it, I knew even the eggshell I could spot coat an area if it flashed
The times I tested it were with rather large repair areas, and would have been pretty obvious
Not being able to see any flashing after the first coat dried really surprised me to say the least
All my really good tests of this were two coat repaint jobs, so I can't say how it looked a week later with only one coat on
But they looked excellent when completed and cured

I believe BM states "no primer in most cases"
I'm not sure if it's on the can...I suspect so
I'll check
 
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Old 01-12-08, 04:55 PM
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Slickshift, thanks for the replies.

Originally Posted by nagra4s View Post
...There are a lot of paints that say mildew resistant, or good also for kitchen and bathrooms etc. I have seen those do less then great in a humid bathroom. I assume the ceiling is not 8 feet high and very large with good ventilation. These conditions are usually ok for any paint. But like i wrote in the other thread, SW Bathroom paint will hold up.

The ceiling are almost 7.5 feet (drywall ceilings). The total space is only 6'X6', but I have a high CFM fan down there.

Are K&B paints a formulation or a finish (or both)?

Doea BM have such a product? It's easier for me to get BM than SW, though of course not impossible for me to do so.
 
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Old 01-12-08, 05:17 PM
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It appears that the new Behr Aura is making quite a stir, and that's not in the can! No primer due to ColorLock technology, outstanding coverage, and low odor are why.

Here's a review: http://www.popsci.com/popsci/flat/bo...h/item_85.html

I always prefer a semi-gloss for bathrooms and kitchens because they tend to hold up better to moisture and washing than latex. I've always preferred Zinnser primers. They now have the Bulls Eye Odorless and the Bulls Eye High Hide Odorless.

Going with low VOC paints and primers is much greener and more healthy for you.
 
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Old 01-12-08, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by GaetanoL View Post
Are K&B paints a formulation or a finish (or both)?

Doea BM have such a product? It's easier for me to get BM than SW, though of course not impossible for me to do so.
Both formulation and finish
The finish is usually a satin or pearl type finish
Though Zinsser's Perma-White has eggshell, satin, or semi-gloss

BM has "Moore's K & B", which is excellent
The story with the Aura line is, it doesn't have a bath specific, as it has all the mold/mildew resistance, scrub-ability, and self-priming-ability of the bath paints in the formula anyway
 
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Old 01-12-08, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole View Post
...Aura is making quite a stir, and that's not in the can!...
They actually got one of those "100 Best innovations for 2007" awards from Popular Science
It is a new technology
 
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Old 01-12-08, 06:44 PM
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GaetanoL, the bottom line is if you use Aura, don't shower in there for at least a week. Give it as much time as possible. The paint needs to cure before it is subjected to moisture. If you don't subject this room to humidity to the point of condensation drops, you should be fine with any top of the line paint that is matte, satin, eggshell, semigloss, gloss.
 
 

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