Paint and caulk shower "fake tile" walls as temporary solution?

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Old 08-15-07, 01:19 PM
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Paint and caulk shower "fake tile" walls as temporary solution?

I have a basement shower stall that needs repair. The current stall has three walls (made of “fake tile” panels) and glass door, and a plastic base. The problem is that the three walls and base are allowing water to infiltrate, and mold is growing as a result. The joints of the walls and base were sealed with two-part body filler plus (non-paintable) silicone caulking, and it didn’t resist constant use (from a friend who stayed in the basement for a few months). The “fake tile” walls were attached to green drywall. In general, a poor job done by a previous handyman.

I know that this shower stall needs to be completely re-done. However, I am inclined towards a temporary, simple solution, for three reasons: a) this basement shower is hardly used. b) That said, I will have a visitor for a couple of months who will use it, and the visitor will arrive very (too) soon. c) I don’t have the money (or time) to repair it properly.

Is it a good idea to *paint* the shower? I was thinking of removing the mold with the appropriate cleaner, remove the silicone caulking (how?), put lots of acrylic paintable caulking to prevent any more water infiltration, and the prime and paint the shower. I know this will not last long, but hopefully it will suffice for my short-term visitor’s stay (3 months or so). After this person departs, I will have the shower re-done more appropriately.

If so, what kind of primer / paint / caulking is recommended? I have a Benjamin Moore store nearby

Thanks
 
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Old 08-15-07, 05:20 PM
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Peel silicone caulk off by any means that work

When the walls are clean and dry use a pigmented shellac primer like BIN. An oil base primer would be 2nd choice. Caulk, then apply 2 coats of an oil base enamel. This will probably last for the specified time period. Wiping the excess water off of the wall after a shower will help the paint survive better but that might be asking too much of a guest
 
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Old 08-15-07, 05:24 PM
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Not a good idea, no

There is no good quick and easy or inexpensive DIY way to paint tiles in a shower and have them last...even three months

It is possible to get three days, maybe even three weeks before it starts peeling off
It's possible, but would be pure luck (and the exception) if it stayed on three months
It will look pretty bad once it starts going too

If you feel you must, them clean, scuff sand if possible or appropriate, clean, prime with BIN pigmented shellac, paint with quality enamel
That will hold out the longest, short of modified epoxy mixtures not available to the general public
 
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Old 08-15-07, 05:33 PM
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I agree it isn't a great idea!! .... but it is doable. I dated a girl about 30 yrs ago and painted her daddy's mobile home shower with oil base enamel. I didn't expect it to last long but it wasn't a long term relationship I ran into her a year or two later and she said it still looked ok, I was shocked but she did say her daddy wiped the walls down religiously after every shower.
 
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Old 08-15-07, 07:32 PM
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Wouldn't the most logical solution be to use a marine coating? Ships go for a while without re-painting. I would think that a marine coating (maybe with some mildewcide) might do the trick. A local boat dealer or marina may be able to hook you up with the proper coating and primer.

SirWired
 
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Old 08-16-07, 11:41 AM
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Thanks all.

Question: instead of a regular oil-based enamel, how about a "porch floor" paint (e.g. urethane-reinforced alkyd enamel, or concrete paint, which presumably is more resistant but perhaps appropriate only for exteriors)? Or an epoxy coating (if they are willing to sell it to me)?

Thanks
 
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Old 08-16-07, 11:46 AM
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You may want to see if the new modified epoxies have made it to your local paint store (stay away from the Big Box "tile paints" or "tub paints/epoxies", they don't have a great track record)

I have been testing some of the newer stuff and it is impressive
(and I have been "Mr. Can't Paint Tile" for quite a few years now, so that's saying a lot)
 
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Old 08-16-07, 11:49 AM
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Thanks for your reply.

Actually, the walls are *not* tile. They are those "fake tile" boards (a single board with embossed lines to give the appearance of tile), which are less glossy than actual tile. I hope the fact that is not tile makes it more likely for my temporary fix to last a bit longer...

Any thoughts on "porch paint" and its suitability for a shower?

Thanks
 
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Old 08-16-07, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by maestroperu View Post
Thanks for your reply.

Actually, the walls are *not* tile. They are those "fake tile" boards (a single board with embossed lines to give the appearance of tile), which are less glossy than actual tile. I hope the fact that is not tile makes it more likely for my temporary fix to last a bit longer...

Any thoughts on "porch paint" and its suitability for a shower?

Thanks
The trick will be getting the paint to adhere properly. Maybe a primer intended for Vinyl siding would work to go underneath the paint. Another tricky bit will be the fact that the vinyl crap probably flexes. That is very rough on paint.

SirWired
 
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Old 08-16-07, 01:22 PM
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Hmmm....yeah I really can't say anything is going to be better than anything else

I wouldn't bet on anything really working long
It's possible I guess
But it would be a crap shoot as to what "might" work better than something else
 
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Old 08-16-07, 03:35 PM
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If the 'tile' boards are what I'm thinking of they are made of a masonite type material with a vinyl [?] coating. I assume that the panels have deteriated with bits and pieces of the faux tile finish missing. You should sand the surface and use a pigmented shellac primer. I wouldn't use any latex paint/primer. An oil base porch and deck enamel may hold up better than an alkyd trim enamel. I doubt an epoxy would be worth the added expense.

Unless you are willing to regularly sand and repaint painting these panels this is only a temporary/stop gap repair.
 
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