Removing very old, very thick paint build-up

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Old 10-31-07, 09:48 PM
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Removing very old, very thick paint build-up

I'm involved in a job restoring some old architecture on an old house.
We don't want to remove it and put new because of its unique design.
It has a lot of scrolls and trim and such and when I apply the paint stripper it kind of makes the wood soggy and I end up not being very accurate in what exactly I'm scraping.
I also don't want to use something too agressive either, because the paint is so thick that I end up chewing up some of the wood underneath.

I'm a little stuck here if someone has any ideas I would really appreciate it.
Thank you

Jim
 
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Old 11-01-07, 03:54 AM
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Ya, old wood can be tricky - have you tried using a heat gun?
 
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Old 11-01-07, 12:35 PM
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If you can get the woodwork off the house without damage, a furniture refinisher could help you out in stripping the old coating.

SirWired
 
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Old 11-01-07, 01:01 PM
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1. Heat gun? Bad idea with old lead paint. Unless you want to die early from lead poisioning, or fire.

2. Try a product called "Peel-Away". Go to your local SW or specialty paint store. It is a product designed specifcally for your type of application. It will both encapsulate the old coatings so you can dispose of it, and remove up to 30! layers of old paint with proper application.

It's not "cheap" about $30/gallon, but it is a real time saver.

Don't forget to neutrialize after stripping, or your new coatings will fail.
 
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Old 11-01-07, 04:19 PM
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I would be remiss to not suggest a profesional
As the EPA clearly states:

"Do not try to perform an
abatement in your home
yourself. Always use a
certified contractor. If not
properly performed, an
abatement can actually
increase the risk
of exposing your family
to lead."

As a general rule, encapsulation, if legal in your area, is the (just about only) real option for DIYers

WARNING*****Do not sand, scrape, media blast, use methylene chloride, propane torch or heat gun that operates over 700* F*****
 
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Old 11-02-07, 08:27 AM
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Thats why professionals use "Peel Away" for some abatement jobs.

However, you are correct that they only way to do it right, (and in some areas the only LEGAL way to do it) is to hire a professional lead abatement contractor.
 
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Old 11-02-07, 09:52 PM
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Thanx for all the replies.

I think I will sub the job out to a proffesional.

They have a small child and I do not want it to come back and haunt me.

Jim
 
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Old 11-04-07, 03:32 PM
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At this point, I would STOP the job. You need to sit down with the customer, and explain to them about lead abatement. It is neither cheap, nor easy. I misunderstood your initial post, and felt that this was YOUR home.

I'm not sure what the inital bid entailed, but you may have some problems ahead if you just bid it out without any concern to what they job actually would require.

Any home older than 1972 carries a serious risk of LEAD.

Again, LEAD abatement is EXPENSIVE, and time consuming. Good luck. Hope you can get this resolved.

PS. If they don't want to do a pro for the job, WALK AWAY. You don't want to get in the middle of this one. You could lose your business, home, and other assets in costly liablity suit. This is not for amatures, so be very careful from this point forward.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 08:54 PM
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Thank you for the info everybody.
That's why I come here.
I do not know everything.

I did not know that lead was such a big issue.

I will inform them of all of this, but I know what they are going to say. " How much will it cost?" and "Can't you just do it?"

Actually they are good people and they will understand and pay me for whatever work I have already done. Only a couple of hrs. so far.
I don't normally do this kind of work anyway, but it's in addition to a lot of work other work they already have.

Thank you all

Jim
 
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Old 11-08-07, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by jmnew51 View Post
I will inform them of all of this, but I know what they are going to say. " How much will it cost?" and "Can't you just do it?"
Ah...I didn't realize you were doing the work for someone
In that case it's even more of an issue
In every state I'm aware of, someone who charges for lead abatement must be certified or else face stiff fines and penalties...not to mention lawsuits
It's expensive, but it's for the customer's own good (health)

It's not a cost or just do it type situation
It's a child's health and development type situation
In fact, they should have their child tested for lead levels right now
Originally Posted by jmnew51 View Post
Actually they are good people and they will understand and pay me for whatever work I have already done. Only a couple of hrs. so far.
It would not be unusual for a painter to uncover a possible or probably or actual lead paint situation during work, and have to stop work until (or if) the problem is corrected
 
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Old 11-08-07, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
Ah...I didn't realize you were doing the work for someone
In that case it's even more of an issue
In every state I'm aware of, someone who charges for lead abatement must be certified or else face stiff fines and penalties...not to mention lawsuits
It's expensive, but it's for the customer's own good (health)

It's not a cost or just do it type situation
It's a child's health and development type situation
In fact, they should have their child tested for lead levels right now

It would not be unusual for a painter to uncover a possible or probably or actual lead paint situation during work, and have to stop work until (or if) the problem is corrected
OMG I wonder if I should get tested too?

I guess the house is about 75yrs. old ans it looks to me like it's never had an overhaul type of painting done to it.

Please!!! Somebody tell me is there any way you can tell if it's lead paint or not, because I'm worried about myself as well now?

I saw this white coat of something underneath it all, that looked like, the first coat of primer.

I am figuring that if this is the original coat of primer that I can be assured that it's lead based?

I will definetly stop the job untill I know more.

Thank you so much.

Jim
 
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Old 11-09-07, 06:36 AM
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I wouldn't panic
It's more dangerous to kids (and can affect development)
And it's really only dangerous in powder or dust, or if the chips are eaten
Which is why the H/O may want to have their kid tested
It's probably nothing...but if it's not they want to know know
We just don't know...maybe the kid has been chewing on some sills or something...

There are a few testing kits on the market
Your local Paint Store will have at least one or two good ones

The lead was used in the shinier topcoats
As far as I know it's not a primer thing
But it really needs to be treated as such if unkown
 
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Old 11-09-07, 07:44 AM
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If the home is 75 years old, there IS lead in the home. It may have been painted recently, but the underlayers WILL have lead in them.

Again, this is NOT a job for amatures. Talk to your customer, and get a trained professional in to assess the job.

People may be "nice" and "understanding", but that isn't going to hold up in court if there is an issue with lead abatment.

Good luck.
 
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Old 11-09-07, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
I wouldn't panic
It's more dangerous to kids (and can affect development)
And it's really only dangerous in powder or dust, or if the chips are eaten
Thanx for the quick reply. I knew it was worse for kids. And he's probably right around that age too. Everything he sees he puts in his mouth(if he can pick it up).

I'll keep you posted>

Jim
 
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Old 11-15-07, 10:25 PM
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Well, I went and got one of those lead test kits at my local hardware store and...

There is lead present in the very first coat. I looks like the primer. It also looks like a filler type of material as well.

I vaguely remember my father having a can of what was called "White Lead" It was like a putty. I think it was used as a wood filler or something back in the '60s.
If I remember correctly it was in a pint sized can and weighed much more than you would expect.

Jim
 
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Old 11-16-07, 04:35 AM
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Originally Posted by jmnew51 View Post
I vaguely remember my father having a can of what was called "White Lead" It was like a putty.

It was probably window glazing or maybe painter's putty.
 
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