exterior painting

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Old 11-06-07, 04:05 AM
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exterior painting

Any info on the best type of exterior primer to use at this time of year (new england)? Temps in 50's, shorter days, etc. Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 11-06-07, 04:35 AM
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That's kind of hard to answer. A lot depends on what is required by the surface you are priming. and the top coat being used.

Latex primers dry faster but can freeze and fail if not dry by the time the temp drops. Oil base will stick better to most problem surfaces but takes longer to dry. Cool temps slow the drying times of both types.

Besides air temp you need to be aware of the temp of the substrate being painted/primed!
 
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Old 11-06-07, 04:51 AM
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Exterior (cedar, I believe) wide siding, badly neglected and heavily peeling down to bare wood, in most spots. Exposed bare wood is very "powdery"-dry and when I scraped over it to get the loose, curling edges it just flakes off into dust. I'll also be doing a very wide eaves/overhang, which is also peeling heavily. I was, because of the temps, going to use a basic exterior latex primer, with a latex topcoat. Another question- do you have an opinion about using Kilz or Kilz 2 as an exterior primer? Thanks for the input!
 
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Old 11-06-07, 08:52 AM
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Oil base kilz isn't really rated for exterior use. I've used very little kilz II, IMO it has poor stain hiding properties and from what I hear it can also have adhesion issues

From what you describe, I believe it would be best for you to use an oil base exterior wood primer. Adding a little japan drier [available at paint store] will speed up the drying time some. IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOT EXCEED THE RECOMENDED AMOUNT!!! Too much drier can cause adhesion problems among other things.

You can still use a latex top coat over the oil base primer. You will probably need to let the primer dry for 48 hrs to make sure it has dried well. SWP sells some low temp exterior latex house paint. You still need to make sure it doesn't get below freezing [actually 35`] until it cures. There may be other brands with low temp paint.
 
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Old 11-06-07, 09:20 AM
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Don't even consider Kilz 2. Get yourself to a paint store (as opposed to a store that happens to sell paint), tell them what you have, and they will sell you what you need.

You can go with Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore, or any one of a zillion regional brands.

SirWired
 
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Old 11-06-07, 09:31 AM
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By the time you get everything scraped, sanded, and primed, the temperatures will likely be too cold. I'd wait until spring for this project.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 04:57 PM
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Power wash all! You will end up with debits in the surface but this is the price for neglect. Power wash will take it all off including bad soft cedar. Then no primer just two finish coats of Duration Sherwin Williams Paint. Guaranteed 5 to 8 years of problem free. If a midtone color....you can use a solid color stain with no primer.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 05:50 PM
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Thank you to all for all the comments. Much appreciated.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 06:49 PM
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You may be too late for oil primer
The Overnight Temps will affect it greatly
Most oil primers I know of are not low temp, and need at least 50*F.....and that's over night temps too
You can push it a little on the overnight temps...but...you are taking a big chance...and the moisture will also kill it
(It's down to frosty levels at night out here now...def. too late)

SW Duration and Pitts' Manor Hall paints however can both be used when overnights are quite low
 
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Old 11-07-07, 06:51 PM
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...and although I agree with the PWing thing, that will add three more days (min.) drying time...which at this point, depending on where in NE you are, you don't have
 
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Old 11-10-07, 03:14 AM
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Thanks to all. This job is on hold until spring, now.
 
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