SWP Pro Classic Vs Duration for trim


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Old 11-21-07, 10:13 AM
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SWP Pro Classic Vs Duration for trim

I'm repainting my originally stained trim. I've sanded and primed it. I planned on going with a semi-gloss for durability and washability. I'm assuming that the durability/washability advantages of Duration over Pro Classic diminish as sheen goes up. With that in mind I was leaning toward pro classic for it's "Superior leveling characteristics" since I'm not quite a master yet at feathering out those brush strokes . Can any of you pros comment on your choice of these two for trim?

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Old 11-21-07, 11:18 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Which primer did you use?

IMO the proclassic waterborne is the best enamel I've ever used. Some say it is a little tricky to apply but I think that only applies if you overbrush it.
 
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Old 11-21-07, 11:32 AM
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Thanks marksr.

I Primed with prep rite pro block.

Hmmm - Tricky to apply eh? I kinda figured the "superior leveling" would make it EASIER to apply. Like I said, I'm not exactly a master of a brush. Although I do appreciate that you think it's the best you've ever used. Although have you ever given the Duration a try?

Do you think some floetrol would help me apply one of these? I'm a little hesitant to add conditioner to a premium paint but I'll do anything to get a nice smooth finish.
 
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Old 11-21-07, 11:46 AM
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I've never had any problems applying the proclassic waterborne but several diyers have reported here that they have had problems with it - best I can tell it is because they overbrushed the paint.

With the exception of the water added from cleaning up spray equipment, I've never thinned the waterborne enamel. It does level out well and dries fast. It also dries as hard as any oil base enamel [unlike latex enamel] You might ask your local SWP rep if you can thin with floetrol or XIM.

I've only used a little of the Duration paint line - none of the enamel.
 
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Old 11-21-07, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
...several diyers have reported here that they have had problems with it - best I can tell it is because they overbrushed the paint...
The most common problem of DIYers and quality waterborne enamels is over-brushing
It's not that all DIYers have the problem, it's just most DIYers having problems tend to be of the over-brushing kind (going back over parts already coated back and forth rather than applying the paint for coverage and letting it level w/o back brushing/overbrushing)
 
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Old 11-24-07, 06:32 PM
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The reason you would use ProClassic over Duration on trim is because the paints are made for two different purposes. The Duration is a washable wall paint. The ProClassic is specifically built as a trim enamel. The advantages of using it vs. the wall paint have to do with its superior leveling (far more noticeable with woodwork and higher sheens), reduced "blocking" (the tendency of paint to stick to things), and an oil-like "shell" look and feel. It doesn't feel "rubbery" like wall paint does.

Why don't you use ProClassic everywhere? For starters, it is expensive. The second reason is it is harder to apply than paint. As others have said, it is real easy to overbrush the ProClassic. It only holds a wet edge for a couple of minutes. That means that if you try and "fix up a thin spot" or do any kind of touchup after those couple of minutes, you will just make a gloppy, brush-marked mess. A wet edge that short would be a disaster with a wall paint.

One hint: It looks like absolute junk wet. You will think it is not covering worth a darn, and will have furrows of brush marks. Give it a couple of hours, and it looks much better. Three brush strokes, tops, and leave it the heck alone. You will be pleased with the results.

Also, as with any water-base paint, while it is dry in four hours, it takes a couple of weeks to cure. If using it for something like shelving, don't pile stuff on the shelving until that cure time is up.

SirWired
 
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Old 11-25-07, 09:12 AM
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SW paints are my choice on all my jobs. The pro classic is what I would use in your two choices. These days I use Superpaint semi gloss on all my trim. I have abandoned Pro Classic due to it failing on window sashes from moisture. If I was going to repaint old kitchen cabinets I would use PC. It does level out like an oil would. Working all day with PC is a bit tough. It is a very heavy paint and runs are likely if not applied right.
 
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Old 11-26-07, 06:58 AM
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Thanks guys. I did end up going with the proclassic. I started off just doing some door trim. Ironically, I think I had the opposite problem of overbrushing - I got a couple of sags and drips. It does feel a bit thiner from other paints that I've used so it takes a bit of getting used to. But it's not a big deal. I just went back and wiped off most of the drips and I give it a quick recoat. I did love the finish once it dried. When I do the rest I'll just have to make sure I spread the paint a little better.

Any other tips to avoid sags and drips? Sirwired's tip about coverage does help - I did feel like I was putting it on way too thin at first (I could see the primer thru my strokes still) which probably led to my sags.
 
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Old 11-26-07, 03:47 PM
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Be sure to use a quality brush - it can make a big difference in any painting experience.

Not sure I can adequately explain the brushing procedure - I've done so much of it that I don't really pay attention to how I do it Practice does make perfect
 
 

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