Anyone know anything about natural paint?

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Old 12-15-07, 11:31 PM
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Anyone know anything about natural paint?

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on Natural Paint. I am going to try to make my own and was wondering if anyone has any idea what types could be used on already painted drywall ceilings and walls? I would like to go with something oil based, but am not sure if it is possible.In the "Natural Paint Book" there is a recipe for oil based wall glaze, but I am not sure if this would work on the drywall? Any help would be greatly appreciated, its surprisingly hard to find any decent information on the net. Thanks very much.
Adam.
 
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Old 12-16-07, 04:49 AM
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Welcome to the forums Adam!

I suspect your book and others like it would be your best bet on this subject. I know centuries ago that many stains were made from berries and such........ and that about concludes my knowledge on this

While a glaze can be applied to most surfaces, it doesn't have any real covering properties.
 
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Old 12-16-07, 06:09 AM
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The reason it is hard to find information on "natural" paint, is because it simply doesn't compare with "not-so-natural" paints. It doesn't coat well, is expensive, difficult to apply, inconsistent, etc.

The biggest problem you will likely encounter is hiding. There simply aren't any good natural pigments that provide the solid, completely opaque white that is the foundation for most paints. Milk, talc, and whitewash (lime/chalk) are about it, and none of those cover very well. If you heavily load up your paint with those natural pigments, you will encounter all sorts of issues that the esoteric additives in modern paint are made to correct.

What did people use before modern Titanium Dioxide if they wanted a nice, opaque white? Lead. Lead Oxide was used as a paint pigment for thousands of years, and it has all sorts of wonderful properties that make it far superior as a paint pigment to even TiO2, but you cannot use it for obvious reasons.

If you can get over the issue of not having an opaque base, certainly there are a lot of natural color pigments you can use...

If you are concerned about environmental friendliness, your best bet would be the low/no-VOC paints sold by most major brands. Go to a paint store (not store w/ paint dept.) and they can hook you up.

SirWired
 
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Old 12-16-07, 08:15 AM
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I think you're going to wish you'd bought a good latex paint from a paint store when all is said and done.
 
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Old 12-16-07, 09:47 AM
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Sherwin Williams has a no-VOC paint called Harmony. I never used it though. I picked up a gallon at the store to read the label. The first thing I noticed was the gallon can was lighter then what I am used to.
 
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Old 12-16-07, 11:23 PM
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Thanks for all the responses. I don't have a problem using Tittanium Dioxide as the opaque base, they even have it on the natural pigments place I'm going to order from. It is an oxide but if I am not mistaken (which I could be) it is created simply by heating the base mineral to a certain temp. which most oxides are. The problem with store bought paint, to me, is the countless of other chemicals and who knows what else they put it in it. I know what will be in mine; linseed oil, citrus solvent/turpentine, pigment, a whiting agent (probably Titanium dioxide now thanks to the advice) and thats it. I was just worried about the opaque quality being to little with the glaze, hopefully the TD instead of the chalk will solve that?
Adam
 
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Old 12-17-07, 07:57 AM
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Well, good luck, and let us know how it turns out!

Yes, TiO2 will do MUCH better than chalk.

Personally, I'd use a Low/No-VOC paint (that means low/no fumes) before I'd smear turpentine on my wall, but to each their own...

SirWired
 
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Old 12-18-07, 03:16 AM
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Originally Posted by AdamRAdam View Post
The problem with store bought paint, to me, is the countless of other chemicals and who knows what else they put it in it.

I know what will be in mine; linseed oil, citrus solvent/turpentine, pigment, a whiting agent (probably Titanium dioxide now thanks to the advice) and thats it.
Well...here's the best article I know with recipes
http://www.sinopia.com/paint.html
 
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