Type of Ceiling Paint to use

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Old 01-09-08, 07:39 AM
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Type of Ceiling Paint to use

I'm confused. On a new stippled ceiling that has not been painted before do you need an oil based paint or latex. Some people have told me all you need is a good quality latex paint. So which type of paint goes on a new ceiling and what type goes on an already painted ceiling. Thanks

rmelgard
 
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Old 01-09-08, 09:01 AM
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There is no reason to use an oil based paint on a ceiling regardless of age or finish type.

It is possible that an oil based stain blocking primer might be used if there is an exisiting problem with stains bleeding through the finish coat.

Ceiling paint is basically a generally white very flat paint.I'm not even sure there is an oil based version of it.

Use of ceiling white is not required but is preferred and you can use most any latex wall paint if you choose to do so.
 
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Old 01-09-08, 11:30 AM
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If you have an unpainted popcorn ceiling you may want to use an oil base primer. Degraded popcorn texture [not always visible] can disolve and fall off There shouldn't be any problems just using latex paint on new popcorn. Most other textures rarely present any problems with latex paint..
 
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Old 01-09-08, 02:04 PM
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ceiling paint question

Thanks for your information gents. Appreciated ! I do have a follow up question if you don't mind. If I am going to use a latex on the ceiling ( and not wanting the stipple to come down ) should the paint strokes be one long even stroke with the roller ? I've heard the stipple make come down if you go over the spot a few times if you perhaps miss a spot. And as for the type of roller cover - one of those ones with the slits in them or a thick nap style. Sorry guys I'm just a beginner

rmelgard
 
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Old 01-09-08, 03:53 PM
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You don't need a funny roller cover. Use at least a 1/2", or a 3/4" (if you can lift it) 100% poly or 50% poly / 50% wool cover from Wooster or Purdy. A 3/8" will not cut it at all for a textured ceiling.

While oil-base primer would not be a terrible idea, a decent water-base primer should work just fine too, especially if this is not a kitchen or bath. Either way, you MUST prime before painting.

When I did my (non-textured) ceiling, a 3/8" roller covered a single 10' stripe. The trick when to avoiding roller marks is to let the roller do the work. Do not "squeeze" the paint out of the roller, instead, let it flow from the roller onto the surface. When I did my ceiling, I made one forwards-and-back trip over the new surface, one forwards-and-back trip over the previous stripe, and then moved on. If you "work" it too much you will have roller marks. However, don't worry too much, as that textured ceiling will cover up a lot of mistakes.

Use quality primer and half-way decent paint from an actual paint store, NOT BigBoxCo. I primed with Sherwin Williams ProBlock Latex, and coated with two coats of Classic99 Flat and then later ProMar 200. (Classic99 is also available in a "Ceiling Paint" which I didn't know when I started painting.)

Oh, and for the spots where you can't reach your roller, use a Purdy or Wooster brush. (Yes, they cost $15 or so, but they will last a lifetime, and save you much headache over a cheaper brush.) A 2 1/2" angle-sash is a popular size for interior work.

SirWired
 
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Old 01-09-08, 06:44 PM
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Confused

Ok, but what if you donít prime 1st?
I was also told that Sherman Williams Classic99 was the paint to use BUT the guy i talked to (who does painting for a living) said that if you didnít prime first then you certainly want to use 2 coats of the Classic99. I just had about 2200 sq' of popcorn removed and they put a knockdown texture up two days ago. Another person said it could come down if you didnít prime. Sirwired, you put 4 layers of stuff up and I do not really want to pay $600 or so on that stuff so IM really confused. I was going to have someone spray it but do I have to prime, paint x2, and seal with the promar?
 
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Old 01-09-08, 07:44 PM
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Ah, my post was unclear. I put up one coat of primer (certainly necessary if you want a quality job), and then two coats of paint only. (I shifted from using Classic99 paint to using the ProMar 200 paint on the ceiling, because the ProMar 200 was on sale when I needed more paint for my ceiling, and is of vaguely similar quality.)

For a job done right, and a job that lasts, you absolutely must put up a coat of primer and two coats of paint. There are paints on the market that claim to "self prime" (Benjamin Moore Aura is the first that comes to mind), but they are expensive, and not DIY paints. In any case, I wouldn't trust it on texture.

SirWired
 
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Old 01-10-08, 06:47 AM
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rmelgard

When painting popcorn it is best to NOT over work the paint. If you miss a spot, wait for the paint to dry before touching it up. This prevents the latex paint from over wetting the the texture which is water soluable. I like to use a 1" lambs wool cover.


Twoleftthumbs

You don't have to prime but primer will make for a better job! New knockdown texture shouldn't pose any painting problems.
 
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