Power Paint Roller?


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Old 01-15-08, 04:56 AM
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Power Paint Roller?

Folks,

Has anyone used any device that helps get the paint on the walls quicker and was pleased with the results?


Thanks
Regards
 
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Old 01-15-08, 05:47 AM
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paint roller

On my wifes insistance, we got a "paint stick". You know the kind where it stores the paint in the handle, and you squeeze a trigger to pump it out? What a POS. Returned it the next day. I knew it was a waste of time, but gotta keep her happy.

I think if any of those contraptions worked, you'd see pro painters buying 'em like crazy. They either roll, or spray, and thats it, so make yer own decision.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 07:44 AM
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Real power rollers do exist, but you cannot afford one.

The one from BigBoxCo is not one you want to use on your house. You must use special roller covers of unknown quality, cleanup is a pain (the pump, bucket, tubing, cover and frame all need cleaning), and the device isn't built to last.

Maybe it could work out okay if you were about to paint your entire house one color. For painting a room or two, it would be a waste of time, as relatively little of the time spent painting a room is actually spent rolling paint.

Get yourself a Wooster Sherlock frame, Purdy or Wooster roller covers, some quality paint from a paint store, and you will be good to go.

SirWired
 
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Old 01-15-08, 07:56 AM
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Power Paint Rollers

Thanks Guys.
I thought I'd ask because I painted one room in our house with a hand roller and it was a bit of a pain. We were going over a dark color with a lighter one, but the main problem was the wall had a textured finish and it required a good working in of the new paint color to ensure that every nook and cranny in the texture surface got new paint. Maybe the answer going forward is a roller with a thicker pile?

Regards
 
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Old 01-15-08, 08:03 AM
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roller

Thicker pile and a QUALITY roller will take care of it. Like Sirwired said, common quality names are Wooster and Purdy, go to a paint store.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 08:58 AM
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Power Rollers

They do exist, and some professionals do use them. In some cases, they do save time, as you are not "dipping" in the bucket all the time.

There are other applications where PROFESSIONAL paint roller setups do make sense- Tiltup/exterior painting in windy conditions. Typically if it is windy spray applications are stopped. With power roller functions the job can continue, with paint on ground, workers on platforms, and no dipping needed. Paint is supplied on demand. Multiple applicators can be using 1 rig, as pressure demands are very low.

For interior uses, some hospitals, nursing homes, and other facilties prohibit spraying due to patient concerns. Power rolling does save time, and materials can be left outside if conditions require it.

I used a power roller in my house, and was "ok" with performance. Spray and backroll is much faster, but power rolling WAS faster than roll/dip.

Cleanup was a time killer though. By the time I cleaned out the Graco pump, and lines, and gun, I had spent about the same amount of time as if I had simply rolled regular.

Power roller covers are about 2X the cost of regular rollers as well.

BTW if the "Power Roller" is Wagner, forget it. Spraytech is the professional line, and its great. Wagner for consumers stinks.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 09:44 AM
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power roller

Guess I should have qualified my post "you'd see pro 'residential' painters buying them like crazy".

I'm sure more commercial painters would have a use for the power rollers, but I don't think I've ever seen one in a house? Maybe cause they were inside? lol

But, boy, are the comments on cleaning right on. A friend brought a wagner airless for a job at work. Jeez, what a pain. Noisy, clogs, sputter...and you had to thin the paint a bit, then the cleanup!! Wasn't worth the effort, we used it on one part, then went to rollers and brushes.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by iceflow View Post
Thanks Guys.
I thought I'd ask because I painted one room in our house with a hand roller and it was a bit of a pain. We were going over a dark color with a lighter one, but the main problem was the wall had a textured finish and it required a good working in of the new paint color to ensure that every nook and cranny in the texture surface got new paint. Maybe the answer going forward is a roller with a thicker pile?

Regards
For texture, I'd use at least a 3/4" inch cover. The "standard" covers in the store are only 3/8".

SirWired
 
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Old 01-15-08, 01:19 PM
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Also rolling out of a 5 gal bucket [instead of pan] makes it easier to load the roller cover. Keeping the roller cover wet at all times will speed up the rolling process. Trying to squeeze the last drop out of a cover wastes time and doesn't apply enough paint to the wall/ceiling.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 05:19 PM
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For ALL walls in my business I use a 1 1/4 inch KNITTED Wooster Lambswool roller. It will roll out large amounts of paint and backrolls down to a perfect finish. Very few dips per gallon of paint used. When two of us do a 500 square foot ceiling, it is the cats meow!! You had trouble mainly because of the roller cover. It will work on texture walls as well.
 
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Old 01-15-08, 05:46 PM
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The good powers rollers are hundreds of dollars
The painters that work them well, can save much time
There is a learning curve, and they are only useful in certain applications
A DIY home re-paint is not one of them

The "homeowner" power rollers are built by companies whose goal is not to provide quality tools for painting, but to separate DIY homeowners from their money
Most don't work well in the first place, and are built to be disposed of after one use

Most professionals I know still use a brush and roller on occupied residential repaints
As our goal is to get in and out as quick as possible, while still providing the best quality service, I think it says a lot that we still do it by hand
Labor is by far our largest expense

If it took that much effort, you probably used too short a nap
I'd recommend a larger nap quality roller sleeve, from a Paint Store (bigboxes don't have the good stuff), like a Purdy White Dove or a 50/50 Wool/Poly, and be sure to use a premium quality paint
Remember not to squeeze the paint out, but apply it...roll it on and lay it down
 
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Old 01-16-08, 04:01 AM
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Wooster makes a great "power roller" type head for an airless sprayer. It cost a few hundred dollars, then there is the expense of an airless. But it is one of the few power rollers that I have seen that painters will use more than once. Some of my customers love it.
 
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Old 01-16-08, 04:59 AM
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Power Paint Rollers

A lot of great info and tips here. Many thanks members!

Much appreciated.

Regards
 
 

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