Primer- zinsser vs. kilz

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-03-08, 03:31 PM
4
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Primer- zinsser vs. kilz

Hi to all- I am new on this site and hope I will be able to learn from some, and help others.

I am planning to start a painting project in a bedroom with plaster walls. Currently the walls are painted white, however there are years of cigarette smoking in the room. I have started to plaster the cracks. I plan on using a tan color BM paint on the walls. My question is which primer should I use? A friend of mine swears by Zinssar BINS. Would this be the correct primer to use? Is it a better product than Kilz? Any other tips? Thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-03-08, 06:59 PM
S
Member
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 78
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have used both and haven't noticed a difference between the 2.
 
  #3  
Old 02-03-08, 07:39 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Original Kilz (oil-based) is a great medium stain blocker
Zinsser's BIN (shellac-based) is the toughest stain blocker

The Original Kilz blocks light to medium stains very well, and applies like a paint, and has some odor

The Zinsser's BIN block any/all stains, including serious mildew, fire damage, and furnace blow-back stains...there's no better stain blocker on the market (to the general public)
But it's a shellac, applies somewhat sloppy and drippy, and stinks like...well...it's really smelly...in a brain cell killing way
Fresh air and a respirator are required

Nic stains...it depends....
I can say, that if they are not too bad, and oil-based stain blocker (like Original Kilz) might work just fine
I'd have to see it to make that call

However, a pigmented shellac (like Znsser's BIN) will work...just about every time
And if it doesn't work, there's nothing better, so just do another coat of it
So I tend to err on the side of 'No Worries' and go with BIN
 
  #4  
Old 02-04-08, 03:39 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
... and just to make things clear, Kilz II [latex] would not be a good choice of primer.
 
  #5  
Old 02-04-08, 03:48 AM
4
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is that true of any primer...not to use laytex?
Thanks to all who responded
 
  #6  
Old 02-04-08, 03:59 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Central MN
Posts: 557
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
use teh BIN on nicotine stains. It is the only product I know of that will most ussually hide them. sometimes 2 coats are required.

as for latex, it will work in some cases, but in yours the stain will bleed right out and it will look like you never primed.

If you are in an area where you can have some windows open with a fan running, do it. This stuff reeks. if not, then wear a respirator. also, you should topcoat within 1 week if at all possible, BIN can get rather hard and not allow paint to stick to it after that.
 
  #7  
Old 02-04-08, 04:33 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
Originally Posted by 4BLONDIE View Post
Is that true of any primer...not to use laytex?
There are many different primers out there, both latex and solvent based - they all have their uses. Latex primers are not suitable for blocking stains.
 
  #8  
Old 02-04-08, 07:00 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
For smoke stains, you really just need to bring out the BIN. Latex primers would be a complete waste of time and effort to try and block that. (Latex Kilz is especially bad, and is terrible for any use...)

As somebody else said, to apply BIN you will need plenty of fresh air and a respirator. (As in, gas-mask thing with absorbent cartridges, not just a paper dust mask.)

SirWired
 
  #9  
Old 02-04-08, 07:09 AM
4
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 5
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you all for your responses..Looks like BIN is the way to go, but with all the warnings you have provided (respirator etc) I think that this is not a DYI project for me. I will bite the bullet and hire a professional using the great information you provided, making sure that the professional uses the BIN.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: