Prime painted walls or use another technique

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Old 02-17-08, 01:30 PM
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Prime painted walls or use another technique

Wanted to get some feedback on my situation. I am painting the walls in my living room and foyer a light green color. The walls are already painted white, but have marks and what not on them from movers moving the old homeowners furniture out. There's also nails and tacks that have been spackled and sanded by me. I tried the Magic Eraser and it cut down some of the black marks, but they're still visible in certain areas. Should I prime the walls before painting, or just paint right over top of them? Should they be sanded?

The paint that I'm using is Behr (I know, I know, but I already bought it). Please let me know what you think based on the fact that I'm using Behr over top of it. I already painted my dining room with orange Behr paint (3 coats) and the finish came out pretty well. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-17-08, 03:04 PM
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I'd spot prime over the marks and repairs
I nice scuff sanding over the whole thing before painting would be a good idea
Be sure to wipe off any dust if you sand
A dry swiffer on a stick works well for that
 
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Old 02-17-08, 04:51 PM
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I agree, a painted wall without stain or adhession issues rarely needs primer. Repairs should be primed as you would any new wall.

One off the reasons we always recomend quality coatings is how well they apply and look. A quality paint may look as good after 1 coat then the cheap paints do after 2-3 coats.
 
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Old 02-17-08, 05:09 PM
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I'm glad you guys keep reminding us that, in general, you don't need to prime the entire wall when repainting. I can't believe how many diy'ers in my area insist total priming, always.

Regarding "scuff sanding". Is this just to knock off "nubs", or is it intended to create better adhesion by roughing up the surface?

On a 10' by normal height wall, how long should scuff sanding take? What grit?

Should a satin or eggshell finish be scuff sanded more, due to it's shine. I've been told that the "real" high quality paints have excellent adhesion properties.

Thanks....not trying to hijack the thread.
 
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Old 02-17-08, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by slowbutsure View Post
Thanks....not trying to hijack the thread.
Not a problem - I'd be interested to know too. I think its to knock the newly primed areas down a bit to a flat wall surface, but I'll let the experts answer.
 
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Old 02-18-08, 03:39 AM
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The purpose of sanding is both for better adhesion and to [hopefully] knock down any rough edges or bumps. It only takes a minute or so to sand a 10' wall with a pole sander.
 
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Old 02-20-08, 05:19 PM
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I am a big believer in priming the entire surface. This gives your top coat the same surface characteristics. So one area is not absorbing more then the other. I always find my top coats are more consistent after a full prime. If you have 12 year old flat dried out paint, and fresh sealed spot primed areas, this could come through depending on the lighting. It always comes down to the lighting.
 
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Old 02-21-08, 03:00 AM
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I think that if you know the current topcoat is of good quality, in good condition, and you will be applying a quality topcoat, then spot-priming should be all that is necessary.

For me, I have been priming every surface prior to painting in my current 15-yr-old house, but I think the pros here will forgive me. The existing surface has been consisting of:

1) Unprimed ceiling with some quantity of random builders "paint", although this junk is an insult to the word.
2) Walls that recently had wallpaper (applied badly and/or improperly) on them, and have had extensive skimming done to the drywall.
3) A "tutti-fruti" room with gouge-your-eyes-out colors, done badly.
4) oil-painted trim
5) A "scab-red" so-called "accent wall" that must have had seven coats of paint on there...
6) Some super-pale pink sketchy-looking flat paint involving large unpainted, unprimed, drywall repairs where they just put some furniture in front of them during the selling process (looks like they ripped some in-wall speakers out of the wall).
7) Some white-painted trim in that room. Okay, maybe that didn't need to be primed, but I was on a roll here...
8) Some Sears "Easy-Living" flat of unknown vintage.
9) A faux-job in the bathroom where they forgot to do their little "vine" accents in a green pigment that could stand up to steam. (They are turning purple.) Must have gotten that stuff from a craft store instead of a paint store.

Now, if I ever want to change my new colors, I don't plan on priming; but with these old coatings, most had so many repairs or were in such poor or unknown shape, I did not want to be sorry later when the topcoat flashed, fell off the wall, or suffered bleed-thru.

SirWired
 
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