Please Explain Paint "Pulling" (and Pushing)

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Old 03-01-08, 07:16 PM
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Please Explain Paint "Pulling" (and Pushing)

Can somebody please explain to me how I would know if a latex paint is pushing or pulling (when rolling or backrolling). Flowtrol directions say to add a certain amount of Flowtrol and then add more if the paints "pulls." But, they don't describe pulling, and I can't find a good explanation.
 
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Old 03-02-08, 04:41 AM
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I'm a pro painter but I don't believe I've ever heard those terms.

Floetrol extends the 'work' time of latex paint and allows it to flow together more to help eliminate brush marks and roller stipple. I don't use floetrol very often. If the paint brushes and rolls well, it should be fine. If the paint is 'dragging' [maybe that's what they mean by pulling] thinning usually helps - floetrol is a better thinner than water. If you add too much, you may have coverage issues.
 
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Old 03-02-08, 05:03 AM
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: How much Floetrol should I use?
A: When you begin to paint, if the paint does not brush or roll easily; if it drags or sets too fast, add Floetrol directly to the paint until the paint works smoothly. Start with Ĺ pint Floetrol per gallon of flat or semi-gloss latex paint if the paint continues to pull, more Floetrol may be added, do not exceed 1 quart Floetrol per 1 gallon latex paint. Let the paintís workability to be your guide as to how much Floetrol you need.
Hey Mark,

Thanks for the response. Dragging and pulling may be the same thing. The blurb above from the floetrol website indicates that it might be the equivalent. The odd thing is that the company claims that floetrol is not a paint "thinner," which seems correct as appears to be more viscous than water.

????
 
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Old 03-02-08, 06:30 AM
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Water thins latex paint which results in a thinner film of paint on the substrate. Floetrol makes the paint slide or flow together which helps in application. it does slow down the drying time some. While it doesn't thin the paint it does reduce the solid content which will affect coverage. The dried film will still be as thick as unthinned paint but too much floetrol will result in a see thru like finish.
 
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Old 03-03-08, 05:29 AM
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Aside from the hide issues, Floetrol also significantly reduces dry-film performance. If you could indeed get something for nothing, the manufacturer would have added the surfactants, water and glycols in Floetrol in the first place.
 
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