Ceiling Paint Help


  #1  
Old 03-09-08, 05:41 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ceiling Paint Help

Hi all, I'm having some issues trying to paint my ceiling. It is new construction and originally had only a thin sprayed on coat (probably no primer). I first tried applying two coats of Behr's ceiling paint, but ended up with lap lines everywhere I overlapped the previous row. Then I tried 1 coat of Moore's Muresco ceiling paint (going in the opposite direction) and that also left roller marks/lap lines. These lines only appear during the day when the light is coming in. I was considering applying a primer than trying again, but not sure if it will help.
This room is large 22 x 25 and I suspect the problem is that I am unable to keep a wet edge long enough to overlap the previous row.
I plan on trying again in a day or two but not sure if I should prime, apply another coat of the Muresco, or just try a normal wall paint.
How do others handle large ceilings?
What size nap should i use (flat ceiling)? I've seen others recommening 1/2 to 3/4 nap. I used 3/8.
The ceiling was never primed, but since I already placed 3 coats of paint on it, is it really needed.
Also, I should mention that my paint never seems to last the spec'd 450 sq feet. I get more like 250 sq feet a gallon. It took me 2 gallons to paint the 22 x 25 room with 1 coat.

Thanks for any help.
 
  #2  
Old 03-09-08, 06:14 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Taylors, SC
Posts: 9,483
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The lap lines make it seem as if you are stretching the paint too thin, trying to squeeze it all out of the roller. This makes it difficult to blend adjacent areas. A roller load will cover adequately about 8 square feet. Apply the paint in a cross pattern then even it out in lines, so to speak. Paint performs best when applied uniformly, rather than trying to cover the thin area bounded by the thicker paint from the edges of the roller.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 03-10-08, 03:42 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
Defenitely use a bigger nap!! 1/2" is the smallest size you should use on a ceiling. Stay away from the cheaper brands [paint and roller covers] as that can also give you problems.

Another coat of flat paint should make it look good. As Chris noted - apply the paint liberally, don't try to squeeze all the paint out of the roller!! Maintaining a wet edge, keeping the roller cover filled with paint should eliminate any problems.
 
  #4  
Old 03-10-08, 06:32 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Chfite & Marksr, thank for the quick responses.
I thought I was applying the paint liberally, that's why I was only getting 250 sqft a gallon. I actually loaded up the roller, rolled a 'W' on the ceiling, than smoothed out the paint to about a 4 x 4 section by rolling in multiple directions.

Marksr mentioned applying another coat. Should I use the ceiling paint again or a regular flat wall paint.
If wall paint, what would you recommend?
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-08, 07:53 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I would say that the likely lack of Primer is one reason you are having a rough time with roller marks, and your paint is not covering much surface.

As others have said, you are probably stretching out a roller load too much. If a 9" long, 3/8" nap, roller will hold an 8'-10' stripe worth of paint (that's, that is waaaayyyy less than a 4'x4' box.)

Also, you are working the paint too much. That "W" pattern stuff is a colossal waste of time that will just cause your back to ache. I cannot, for the life of me, figure out why it is pushed so much in books and on TV. At least none of the pros here do it, and the handyman that showed me how to paint didn't do it either.

Go forward and back once to lay down the paint, and then go forward and back on the last stripe to even things out, then move on.

I've done okay with a 3/8" nap, 10' stripes, and a coat of SW PrepRite ProBlock Latex Primer, and two coats of Classic99 Flat.

And yes, use good roller covers. Purdy White Doves are cheap, high quality, and available everywhere. Others here prefer Wooster or SW 50/50's. Still others use 100% wool covers...

Lastly, you really have to wait overnight to evaluate for roller marks. The paint is not actually "dry" in the four hour recoat time. You will find that quite a few roller marks disappear as the paint cures.

SirWired
 
  #6  
Old 03-10-08, 08:37 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Not sure why I said 4 x 4. It's more like 3 x 3 squares that I was painting in.
I really feel like my problem is with the paint drying to fast.
(The back of the Moore ceiling paint states to not roll back into it 5 minutes after appling. Not sure that I can work my way 22 feet across the ceiling and back in 5 minutes!)
Which is why I was considering using regular flat wall paint or maybe adding floetrol to the ceiling paint.
Do you think that a coat of primer will help me keep a wet edge longer? With already 3 coats, how much more paint could the drywall suck up.
The 3rd coat was applied 2 days ago and I've been using Purdy White Doves (3/8).
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-08, 10:22 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ah, I just thought of something else...

A big problem with many DIY painters is squeezing the paint out of the roller. This is just begging for roller marks. Instead, you need just enough pressure so that the roller is touching the ceiling across it's whole surface. Beyond that, let the roller and the paint do the work.

You should be able to avoid rolling paint that has been rolled longer than five minutes with no problem... Just stick with stripes instead of squares. With a 1/2" cover, you should be able to do half the length of the room with one stripe, easily. Remember, forward, back over the new ceiling, forward and back over the previous stripe, and move on.

Do the following pattern:

11111111222222222
33333333444444444
55555555666666666
etc.

or, if you work fast,
11111111222222222
44444444333333333
55555555666666666

Do not:
11111111444444444
22222222555555555
33333333666666666

or you will certainly end up with a big ridge in the middle of the room.

Certainly it isn't the paint's fault... that Muresco is a good ceiling paint.

I am sure marksr or slickshift can give you their advice on if primer will do any good now. Personally, I'm of the view that it can't hurt... Maybe this would be a good job for Gardz; it should be able to penetrate all that paint to usefully seal things up and enhance adhesion to the drywall.

SirWired
 
  #8  
Old 03-10-08, 04:37 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,076
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
While a primer might help a little, I don't think it is worth the effort at this time. Are you using a roller pole attached to your roller frame? if not, using one should speed up your application.

On new homes I usually use a wall paint on the ceiling - it sprays better than most of the ceiling paints do. Ceiling paints typically dry flatter [less sheen] than wall paints but I've never had any issues with cut and rolling wall paint on the ceiling. Either one should be fine.
 
  #9  
Old 03-10-08, 06:55 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Cape Cod
Posts: 4,320
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Three biggest reason for roller lines are:

Cheap Paint
Cheap Sleeves
Poor Technique

You've got one of the best ceiling paints in the biz there, that's not it
Use at least a Purdy White Dove, or maybe even a 50/50 wool/poly sleeve
The most common poor technique is trying to squeeze the paint out of the roller (like a sponge)
Should be applying the paint...laying it on...not squishing
Also on larger ceilings an 18" roller can help
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: