How soon can I paint?


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Old 03-13-08, 12:32 PM
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Question How soon can I paint?

Hello. My husband and I are in the process of finishing our basement - FINALLY - and I haven't been able to get a solid answer on how soon we can paint after the ceiling and walls have been textured. I've been told anywhere from 1 day to 3 weeks...? Our ceiling was textured 2 days ago and our walls will be textured tomorrow. I was hoping to start painting this weekend, but don't know if that's possible considering I want it to look good and be done right. Also, do I have to wait any certain amount of time after I prime the walls before I can paint them? Or just dry time? Thanks!!!! Just looking for any help at this point as I am more than a novice on this topic...
 
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Old 03-13-08, 01:16 PM
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The can directions were written by lawyers, inspired by paint labs trying worst case scenarios. Your own room humidity and temperature could swing the time from ready in one hour, to still sticky-wet after three weeks. An important factor is how the room is ventilated. Imagine those pails of texture as buckets of water that must evaporate and somehow escape from the room. You know what happens when you boil off a stock pot of water in the kitchen.

Use your judgment. Is the surface dry? Does it seem dry through? Try to dent it with your fingernail.

A space heater and fan will speed things up. Especially, open doors or windows, so moisture can escape the house as well. This helps keep your furniture and woodwork in good shape too.
 
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Old 03-13-08, 03:32 PM
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Generally you can paint texture after 24 hrs - it can be primed/painted sooner under the right conditions, or longer under damp conditions. basically once the texture has lost it's gray/wet color and is all uniformly white - 4hrs later it's ok to paint.

24hrs is also a good rule of thumb for paint and primer. Under the right conditions, primer can be top coated after 4 hrs but it is very easier for the moisture from the next coat of paint to rewet the primer which might cause problems.

Fresh air circulation always helps to speed up dry time.

btw - welcome to the forums!!
 

Last edited by marksr; 03-15-08 at 04:34 AM. Reason: better wording
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Old 03-14-08, 07:47 AM
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Marksr,

Do all primers require that 4hr drying time? The SWP PrepRite Pro Block Latex I use as my "standard" primer states a 1hr dry time before topcoating, or 4hrs if used as a stain sealer.

Not that this has anything to do with the OP's question, but I was curious. (More interior painting to do this weekend.)

SirWired
 
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Old 03-14-08, 04:16 PM
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I was giving a general overview of drying times. There are primers [paints too] that have very short drying/recoat times. It is always a good idea to read the label

IMO latex primers do a poor job of sealing stains!
 
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Old 03-14-08, 06:26 PM
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The Prep Rite Pro Block Latex I use all the time. I really believe this needs 4 hours dry time. But do I wait this?? NO! I want to rock and roll on a job. If you rush this bubbles will haunt you.

Wait four hours after the Primer and apply one finish coat. Wait 24 hours before the second coat. If time is not a issue, I would do the primer and two finish coats in three consecutive days.

I agree the texture should be good to prime after 24 hours assuming warm temp.
 
 

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