Spraying Primer on New Sheetrock


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Old 03-18-08, 10:45 AM
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Spraying Primer on New Sheetrock

I have new sheetrock that has been lightly textured. I am planning on spraying primer and ceiling paint with a graco airless sprayer. Do I need to back roll after spraying? If so for primer and color coats? Primer only? None?

How much time after spraying does one have to back roll?

Thanks,

Brad
 
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Old 03-18-08, 12:39 PM
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It is always best to back roll after spraying but...... I seldom do on the primer but if you spray the finish coat it should be back rolled!

You don't want to wait too long, basically you are using the airless to apply the paint [instead of dipping the roller]
 
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Old 03-19-08, 06:12 AM
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The only real products that don't get back rolled are High Builds, everything else needs to be back rolled. You can use and 18" roller so it will go faster.
 
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Old 03-19-08, 11:55 AM
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If I am spraying the ceilings white would you suggest 1 coat or 2 coats after the primer? I plan on two coats on the walls but with the primer being white and the ceiling paint being white and flat does it need a second coat?

Thanks,

Brad
 
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Old 03-19-08, 12:14 PM
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My view on the never-ending two-coats vs. one debate is that if you are going to go through all the trouble of prep, adding the 2nd coat of finish paint is about the quickest part of the job. Does it make a huge difference? No. But I suspect that if you did two coats on half the ceiling and one coat on the other, you would likely be able to tell the difference.

SirWired
 
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Old 03-19-08, 12:28 PM
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I seldom apply a 2nd coat of paint to the ceilings with the exception of a bath ceiling that gets enamel. That said, a 2 coat job is always superior to a single coat.

Sometimes to be competitive, you have to cut a few corners. I'd rather spend less on the ceiling [where it isn't as critical] and spend more painting the walls [where it's more important] .......... and rolling walls is a whole lot easier on your neck than rolling ceilings
 
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Old 03-19-08, 02:06 PM
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I have an 18" roller coller and handle now.

If I am working alone, how large of an area can I spray before pausing to backroll? Should I put some paint on the roller cover before I start rolling somehow? I would think when it is dry it would suck the paint off the wall. Do I have to get some of the paint off of the roller cover at some point? Or can I keep going until I'm done?

Thanks,

Brad
 
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Old 03-19-08, 03:31 PM
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The characteristics of the paint/primer, substrate and the weather conditions will make the back roll window of time differ.

What I always do is set the roller on the wall and spray it heavily with paint as I roll it a little - this will "prime" the roller. If the roller gets too much paint on it, you are spraying the paint too thick but you can jump ahead to bare wall and dry the roller up some. You don't want to dry roll as it might lift some of the paint off of the wall - especially if it's starting to set up.
 
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Old 03-21-08, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by sirwired View Post
My view on the never-ending two-coats vs. one debate is that if you are going to go through all the trouble of prep, adding the 2nd coat of finish paint is about the quickest part of the job. Does it make a huge difference? No. But I suspect that if you did two coats on half the ceiling and one coat on the other, you would likely be able to tell the difference.

SirWired
I could not have said it better!!
 
 

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