What would you do?

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Old 05-15-08, 10:54 PM
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What would you do?

After analyzing our bubbling problem in our new house we've found it is is due to the following:

1 - the builder did not properly clean the drywall before painting

2 - the builder did not prime the drywall before painting

3 - the builder used cheap chalky paint


1+2+3 = spotty delamination problem when priming for new paint.

Taking the original builder paint off is really not an option I'm willing to consider. What other options can you guys give me? I contacted Zinsser by email and they say they have no products for this situation??? I thought GARDZ or PEEL-STOP or even 1-2-3 might help but apparently not.

Cheers
 
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Old 05-16-08, 05:00 AM
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Anywhere that paint was applied over drywall dust, you need to sand the paint off - it will come off fairly easy because it lacks a good bond to the drywall. These areas may need a thin coat of joint compound and/or texture to make them blend with the rest of the wall.

You should be ok using a good primer and then top coating with your favorite quality brand of paint. I'm sure zinnser was hesitant to recomend any of their primers because of the possibility of failure due to the underlying paint....... but the odds are it will be ok.

Just reread your post. If I understand right, the builder had a coat of orange peel texture applied which the painter applied 1 coat of cheap paint to [and no primer]...... and now the moisture in the primer is disolving the texture, making a mess as you prime

That is a tough spot to be in. Probably your best bet [other than removing all the texture] would be to go ahead and prime, let it dry and then go back and sand, skim and retexture as needed.
 
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Old 05-16-08, 09:27 AM
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The builder messed this up. Get them to fix it.
 
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Old 05-16-08, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Anywhere that paint was applied over drywall dust, you need to sand the paint off - it will come off fairly easy because it lacks a good bond to the drywall. These areas may need a thin coat of joint compound and/or texture to make them blend with the rest of the wall.

You should be ok using a good primer and then top coating with your favorite quality brand of paint. I'm sure zinnser was hesitant to recomend any of their primers because of the possibility of failure due to the underlying paint....... but the odds are it will be ok.

Just reread your post. If I understand right, the builder had a coat of orange peel texture applied which the painter applied 1 coat of cheap paint to [and no primer]...... and now the moisture in the primer is disolving the texture, making a mess as you prime

That is a tough spot to be in. Probably your best bet [other than removing all the texture] would be to go ahead and prime, let it dry and then go back and sand, skim and retexture as needed.
Thanks guys. Our builder painter was a dumbass. This guy used flat paint to touch up a semi-gloss wall and didn't even notice. Then he proceeded to use sandpaper to remove wood stain from our marble thresholds

Marksr,
When I say chalky paint I mean that it looks like normal paint but if you rub your finder over it you sometimes get a white residue/powder on your finger. And this paint soaks up water like a sponge.

I forgot to mention an important point about why I don't want to remove the old paint. The builder paint job actually looks/feels very solid and well bonded to the drywall. That is until I apply the new primer and then the weak adhesion areas show up. I don't want to have to apply primer everywhere just to identify and remove the old paint??

Cheers
 
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Old 05-16-08, 02:14 PM
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A lot of the cheaper builders use a light texture on the walls which helps to hide any defects and then they get a painter at a cut rate price, so to make a profit, they skip the primer and apply a cheap flat paint.

Because of the lack of primer and the low quality of the paint, when you get it wet, the moisture goes thru the paint and tries to disolve the texture underneath - that's where the problem lies.

Usually there isn't a big problem with applying latex primer over this paint, unfortunately that doesn't seem to be the case on your house. It's possible that an oil base primer would go on ok without hurting the current paint or texture......... but oil is stinky and slower to dry.

If you repaint without a primer [because no primer was previously used] the new paint won't preform as well as it should. It is hard to say if you can get by or if you would be setting yourself up for more problems later.

Unless the latex primer is real thin, it shouldn't affect the underlying paint/texture anymore than applying the finish paint without primer.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by xroxer View Post
T
...When I say chalky paint I mean that it looks like normal paint but if you rub your finder over it you sometimes get a white residue/powder on your finger. And this paint soaks up water like a sponge....

...I apply the new primer and then the weak adhesion areas show up. I don't want to have to apply primer everywhere just to identify and remove the old paint??
Zinsser's Gardz is made for this type of problem (chalky builder's paint)
It soaks in and turns the whole surface hard, and seals it
Then it can be properly coated with premium interior paint

You'll pretty much want to coat any walls (you are going to repaint) with Gardz first
 
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Old 05-23-08, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by slickshift View Post
Zinsser's Gardz is made for this type of problem (chalky builder's paint)
It soaks in and turns the whole surface hard, and seals it
Then it can be properly coated with premium interior paint

You'll pretty much want to coat any walls (you are going to repaint) with Gardz first
I contacted Zinsser and they said my only option is to remove all the builders paint ???

They said PEEL-STOP, GARDZ, or 1-2-3 will not work!!

Just to give you guys an update : I have no intention of taking al the builders paint off as it would take months. What seems to be working for me right now is to repair weak spots as I go. I first prime the wall which immediately identifies weak spost. Then remove paint down to the drywall at the weak spot, patch, sand, re-prime entire wall with 1-2-3 and then paint over. Seems to be working so far.
 
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