How to repair improper application of stain to bar stools (TOO THICK!!!)


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Old 07-23-08, 06:54 PM
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How to repair improper application of stain to bar stools (TOO THICK!!!)

Okay, here's the short version.... I put too much stain on my four bar stools (bottom line!!)

I'm using Minwax oil based 'Red Oak 215' on Rubber wood bar stools.

The first coat was wiped off properly but I didn't know that I needed to pretreat hard wood, so it became blotchy. I thought I could brush on the second coat thick without wiping it off (I NOW KNOW) and create a darker, even coat that would fill in the blotches. Obvioulsy, that didn't work and it's WAY too thick (not sure it's even going to dry).

Here’s some pics:





What's the best (easiest) way to fix this???? I just want to get my stools presentable? I don't care if it's perfect, I just don't want it to looks so bad. Any help is GREATLY appreciated. Thanks!!
 
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Old 07-23-08, 08:18 PM
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As soon as possible you should try to rub paint thinner onto the project with some rags. Soak the rags in the thinner and see if it loosens the excess stain. If it does, wipe it off with clean rags.

If paint thinner isn't strong enough to cut the sticky stain, try using lacquer thinner instead.

And just so you know, once you are done with the rags, spread them out seperately so they can dry. If you throw oily rags into a trash can there can be spontaneous combustion.

In your pictures, the wood is so shiny, it makes me wonder if you applied stain over the top of an existing finish. If that's the case, you should know that stain is made to go onto BARE wood, not over an existing finish. Did you strip and sand the chairs? -OR- it could just be the reflection of the flash I am seeing.
 
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Old 07-23-08, 08:32 PM
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Thanks for the reply... And GREAT info on the rags (I've heard that before, but definitely not something I would have remembered)

So, do you think I'll have to restain again or could it possibly wipe off good enough? I'm going to go to Lowes in the morning and get all the supplies I need, like mineral spirits, paint thinner, lacquer thinner and rags. Should I get anything else?

How difficult is this project? And what can I expect from the final result? I'm almost considering just staring over with some new stools ($275 is A LOT of $$$$ but I don't want to spend a lot more and not get a decent result ;( What do you think????

Thanks for your help!
 
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Old 07-23-08, 08:38 PM
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If you wait until morning, the stain will likely be too dry to remove... or at least PARTS of it will be dry, parts will be tacky. If that's the case, you might want to look at some of the chemical strippers that they will have in the store. There are several varieties to choose from.

It's possible that you may discover that you need to sand and stain the chairs again. If they didn't have a consistant color before, it's not likely that they will have a consistent color after you've scrubbed the excess stain off.

If you do end up stripping them, following your stripping and sanding, I'd recommend you try a different brand of stain- maybe Sherwin Williams oil or water based wood stains. Products from your name brand paint stores will likely be superior to "Minwax".
 
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Old 07-24-08, 04:32 AM
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Even though it's the next day, wet thinner rags may still work. You'll need to get the stain good and wet to see if it will disolve - it will require a lot of elbow grease

It is rarely ever a good idea to apply a 2nd coat of stain. Stain is formulated to soak in with the excess wiped off. The 1st coat of stain will somewhat seal the wood making it difficult for the wood to obsorb any more stain.

What prep did you do prior to staining? As noted above - you can't stain over an existing finish and expect good results.

Personally, I've never had any issues with minwax products - they may not be the best quality but there are certainly stains/polys of lesser quality out there too.
 
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Old 07-24-08, 12:32 PM
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Well, after four hours of working with steel wool and mineral spirits I FINALLY got the thick coat of stain off. It's not perfect, but it's better. There are still a few places, like in the corners and crevises, where it still looks dark (thick). Will this be a problem? I'm planning to go back over the chairs with a damp rag soaked in mineral spirits. Followed by another rag with stain (to restain the areas where I rubbed the stain thin). Am I right or should I do something else????? THANKS!!
 
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Old 07-24-08, 03:36 PM
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What prep did you do before you ever applied the first coat of stain? were the chairs down to raw fresh wood?
 
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Old 07-24-08, 04:17 PM
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marksr, it was raw/unfinished wood from an unfinished funiture store. It's made of rubberwood and I did NOTHING to pretreat it before staining (now I know). Today I stripped off the excess stain with steel wool and mineral spirits and the stools are close the same condition they were in after the first coat of stain; however, there's a lot of light areas where I rubbed harder with the steel wool, and there are also some darker areas like around the corners and edges of the back boards (where it's too tight to get to).

Here's some pics:
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So, what should I do now?

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 07-25-08, 03:58 AM
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Well they are starting to look better

You still need to remove some of the stain on places like the bottom pic just below the seat. The run needs to be removed and the light spot might need to be feathered some. Hopefully all your raw spots will take a little stain. You don't want the stain to dry on top of the surface. The correct way to apply stain is to put it on [brush,spray or rag] and then wipe off the excess. The stain needs to be sucked up by the wood, not lay on top of the surface.

I also have several pieces in my house from the unfinished furniture store, most with the same type of wood. That wood is very hard and won't obsorb a lot of stain which makes it harder to stain with a lot of color...... but you're getting there
 
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Old 07-25-08, 06:45 AM
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Thanks Marks! I'm going to work on them some more today (I'll have MUCH more work in these stools then anyone will ever realize

By the way, since you've worked with this type of wood, how much of a difference does the pretreatment make??
 
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Old 07-25-08, 08:00 AM
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Marksr, one more thing.... Can you recommend a finish for these stools? I'll be using them with a VERY glossy epoxy coated bar. I already purchased some Cabot Gloss Polyurethane, but I'm not sure if that's the right thing. Do you have an opinion?
 
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Old 07-25-08, 03:34 PM
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Pretreating with a wood conditioner is only for soft wood! The wood from a rubber tree is hard and tightly grained. In my kitchen I have a hutch [oak] and a bar/island and chairs [rubber tree] that are all stained with the same stain - the hutch came out about a shade or two darker.

I don't remember if I've ever used any cabot poly but it should be ok. I usually buy from SWP and use their poly or varnish in gallon size although I've used quite a few minwax poly [quart size] over the years both with good results.
 
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Old 07-25-08, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
If you do end up stripping them, following your stripping and sanding, I'd recommend you try a different brand of stain- maybe Sherwin Williams oil or water based wood stains. Products from your name brand paint stores will likely be superior to "Minwax".
FYI, Minwax is a Sherwin Williams-owned company. Not that that means a whole lot... they own Thompson's too, and we all know what a sad, pathetic, product that is...

SirWired
 
 

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