Primer and Texture paint - which comes first?


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Old 07-25-08, 08:13 AM
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Primer and Texture paint - which comes first?

Hello! My bathroom is (badly) textured, and over the texture paint is latex in a dark forest green . Yeah, I know, it was a phase.

I would like to retexture using this texture paint BEHR PREMIUM PLUS Interior Texture Paint - Smooth and then paint the walls a light khaki color. Because of the dark color, I probably need to prime too.

My question is, do I prime first, over the latex and under the texture? Or do I texture first, then prime? Does it matter?

Finally, I was just going to go to SW and ask them to recommend a primer to go over latex and under latex, but if anyone has suggestions let me know.

I appreciate any responses!
 
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Old 07-25-08, 09:46 PM
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Really, I'm not sure that texture is a good idea in a bathroom. Every textured surface is an additional little nook for moisure/mold/mildew to collect. Really, the best choice would be a specialty bath paint (I think both Sherwin and Ben Moore make one), and not anything from Behr. Is scraping off the existing texture and skim coating for a smooth surface an option?

You do not need to prime a topcoat in good condition... really, it is dark over light that usually needs more help with hide than light over dark. (It has to do with the opacity of white pigment vs. most color pigments.) Your prep work should concentrate on getting any residue off of the walls (hair spray is notorious for causing adhesion issues.) TSP is a commonly used cleaner for paint prep. Also, if it is an option, do not use the bathroom for a shower a week before and after painting to let things get nice and dry.

If you would like to take a "belt and suspenders" approach and apply primer anyway, a nice bonding primer like SW PrepRite ProBlock Latex should do just fine. I use it for almost all my priming and it does pretty well. (NOTE: Unless a primer is specifically meant for hiding (most aren't), they usually hide quite poorly.)

SirWired
 
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Old 07-26-08, 04:38 AM
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I agree that skim coating is the best way to go! Then sand, dust, prime and paint with a good latex enamel, preferably a kitchen and bath enamel. It would be a good idea to lightly sand the walls prior to skim coating.
 
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Old 07-26-08, 12:23 PM
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I would love to get rid of the texture altogether - I only did it because the drywall was damaged when I removed old wallpaper. How do you scrape off texture when it's under latex paint? Do you just sand it down to drywall, or is there another method?

I am nervous about skim coating because I've never done it and have no idea how it's done, and one of the things I'm trying to correct this time around is the sloppy, obvious diy aspects of my first paint & texture job in the room. My thought was that the texture paint- which is a smooth texture, not sandy or bumpy - would go on with a low nap roller, and be pretty smooth. However, I defer to greater wisdom - that's why I'm here!

If I do skim coat, how do I do it? How long will it take to dry before priming?

Thanks so much for the responses,
Jenn
 
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Old 07-26-08, 05:22 PM
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It's doubtfull that much of the painted texture will scrape off but it might be worth a try. I'd sand off what I could with 60 - 80 grit sandpaper. Then take joint compound with a wide broad knife [I use a 10"] and apply a thin coat to the wall. You don't necessarily need to build up the j/c - just enough to make the wall smooth. If you have trouble working against wet j/c, you can break the wall up into managable sections and fill in inbetween when the j/c is dry. Once you've covered the entire wall and it is dry [j/c will turn white when dry] sand it all and touch up any areas if needed.

You are then ready for primer and paint
 
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Old 07-28-08, 09:17 AM
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Thanks,
I'll give it a try.

Jenn
 
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Old 07-28-08, 12:31 PM
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I should have asked this before I hit "reply" on the last post:

I plan to sand my painted walls to smooth the worst of the texture then skim with joint compound to smooth it out. Finally I'll prime and paint with a bathroom-safe latex.

Will the joint compound stick to my sanded latex walls, or do I need to prime before applying the skim coat too?

If I don't have to that would be great; I hate to take that extra time and spend more money on primer, but I'd rather do that then have the whole project get ruined because I cut corners.

Thanks!!
Jenn
 
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Old 07-28-08, 04:37 PM
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The j/c should adhere fine to the sanded paint.
 
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Old 07-29-08, 07:05 AM
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Thanks! Now all I need is the weekend to get started!
 
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Old 07-31-08, 02:01 PM
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Okay, I'm back - just a couple of final questions:

1. Can I use pre-mixed joint compound? Will I need to thin it to skim coat?
2. How much will I need? I am doing a room approximately 10 x 10 with a regular height ceiling.

Thanks so much!!
 
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Old 07-31-08, 04:18 PM
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Yes the premixed j/c is the preferred mud to use, thinning it slightly usually helps it slide better Be sure to mix it well!

It is hard to say how much you would need. A lot depends on how thick you apply it. 1 gallon probably isn't enough and you can buy a 5 for less $ than 2 singles.
 
 

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