Sheetrock Easy Sand


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Old 09-14-08, 08:02 PM
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Sheetrock Easy Sand

I do electrical work on commercial jobs and always see the Tapers using Sheetrock brand Easy Sand powder. I've asked them and they say that the contractor wants it used because it drys like concrete. The common term used for it is "Durabond" but they say that they use the Sheetrock brand because it's sandable unlike Durabond. After a coat or two with the Easy Sand they use the typical Sheetrock brand joint compound in the blue top 5 gallon bucket, they say it gives a better finish coat than the Easy Sand.

So it this true for most applications? If I had to patch some holes around the house, should I use this Easy Sand? Will it last longer without cracking?
 
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Old 09-15-08, 04:39 AM
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Setting compounds do dry harder and may resist cracking better than a ready mix compound but the main reason to use it is speed. Depending on temp and humidity, it may take all day for ready mix to dry. A setting compound can allow all 3 coats [and tape] to be done in 1 day.

Easy sand and durabond are made by 2 different companies but imo they are basically the same. Easy sand may sand a little easier than durabond but it still doesn't sand as easy as regular j/c. I normally use durabond [when needed], apply it neatly and use a ready mix j/c for the final coat - which is the only coat I sand. A setting compound is also good for plaster repairs, especiall for those of us with no real plaster experience.

It is hard to say if easy sand will last longer, a lot depends on the repair being made.
 
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Old 09-15-08, 05:12 AM
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I can certainly attest to the speed of the quickset-type compounds. Our handyman (ex-drywall-pro) was able to fill some pretty large holes in the wall in a few hours with nothing more than mesh tape and about seven coats of quickset (which he was using for other uses at the same time.) These are holes of a size that a DIY book would be telling you would need filler board and a whole lot of work. If he had used premix to do this, it would have taken well more than a week, if it could have been done at all.

SirWired
 
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Old 09-16-08, 02:45 PM
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Thanks for the help guys!
 
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Old 09-20-08, 07:33 PM
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Easy Sand is used to speed up the patching process. Typically just like you stated: the first two coats are done with a chemically setting compound like Easy Sand and finished off with a topping compound like Plus 3 or some other easier sanding compound.

Will it last longer? Don't know. But new construction jobs (whole new houses) rarely use chemically setting compounds. All three (or four) coats of mud are usually regular drywall compound (like that which comes in the 5 gallon bucket with the blue top). I suppose if it lasted longer the drywallers would use the quick set on the new houses to prevent call backs - but that doesn't seem to be the case.
 
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Old 09-22-08, 04:27 AM
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Ready mix joint compoud is mainly used because it's easier to work with! You can use it straight out of the bucket [mixing/thinning helps] and if you need to stop for a little while, it won't harden in your pan or bucket.

I've painted quite a few houses that were taped and finished with setting compounds but the only reason a setting compound was used was time. Normally 3 or more days are allocated for the drywall finisher. When his time is cut short - setting compounds are used.
 
 

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