How to prevent a sticky surface


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Old 10-14-08, 06:36 AM
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How to prevent a sticky surface

I want to paint over an existing mantle that is a semi-gloss latex enamel. It was painted ages ago and the paint is still sticky when you remove frames, decorative items, etc. I want to repaint and prevent the stickiness. Have read many ways to do this and I'm confused. I have a friend who painted her semi-gloss fireplace trim with polyurethane, I have not had such good luck with that product and I'm unsure I want to try on this.
Should I use TSP to clean the existing surface and use an oil-based paint?
Or use a primer like Zinnser 123 and then paint over top of that with a oil-based paint?

Can I use a latex semi-gloss paint and cover with some sort of urethane to harden?

What is a waterborne urethane? Is that oil based? and could I use that directly over semi-gloss latex paint? THank you
 
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Old 10-14-08, 09:18 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Latex enamels never dry as hard as oil base or waterborne enamels do. Quality latex enamels preform better than their cheaper counterpart.

It is hard to beat an oil base enamel for durability but light colors tend to yellow with time. Waterborne enamels are a good choice. IMO, SWP's proclassic waterborne enamel is some of the best paint I've ever used.

You shouldn't need a primer over painted wood. You can use most any type of enamel directly over your current paint - after a light sanding. Your local paint store will have better coatings to choose from than a big box paint dept.

Applying poly/varnish over paint is rarely a good idea.
 
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Old 10-14-08, 12:06 PM
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Another vote for the SWP ProClassic Waterbourne! Give that stuff a couple of weeks to cure before piling stuff on it, and it does just fine. I use it for shelving, doors, windows, etc., and have no problem with sticking.

SirWired
 
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Old 10-15-08, 08:55 AM
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paint & brush question

Hi - I'm new to this does the SW refer to Sherwin Williams? Also, what type of brush should I use for application of the proclassic a natural brush or synthetic? I've read that it's hard to apply this stuff. Thanks
 
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Old 10-15-08, 01:05 PM
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SWP or SW= sherwin williams paint

Natural bristle brushes should only be used with solvent based coatings. I don't know if using a natural bristle brush with waterborne will hurt but the clean up would definitely kill the brush!

I'm partial to the Purdy line of brushes but good results can be had with any quality synthetic bristle brush.

I've never had any issues with waterborne enamel application but I've got over 35 yrs painting experience. The biggest mistake people make when brushing is overbrushing the coating - this can lead to poor results with waterborne enamel. SWP's proclassic has great leveling characteristics.
 
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Old 10-16-08, 10:47 AM
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waterborne enamel

When I google "waterborne enamel" the only thing that comes up is a reference to SW paints. Is a waterborne enamel the same thing as a 100% acrylic enamel such as BM Regal semi-gloss which is a 100% acrylic enamel or Duron's Design Accents 100% Acrylic? Are these all water-based paints?

If you're acrylic does that mean that you are not latex?

What does waterborne mean? Thanks
 
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Old 10-16-08, 12:55 PM
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SWP's proclassic waterborne is the only one that I'm real familiar with. Ben Moore also has one but I don't know the name, there may be other brands as well.

I don't really know the definition of acrylic. there are latex paints that have acrylic in them and some that don't. There are also automotive paints that are solvent based and have an acrylic in them.

Waterborne isn't the same as latex although it does clean up with water. Waterborne enamels [like SWPs] dry quick but also dry to a film hardness similiar to oil base enamel. Unlike oil base, waterborne enamel won't yellow over time. Maybe not an accurate discription but waterborne is kind of a cross between latex and oil with the good features of both, eliminating the not so good parts.

Hope this helps , . if I've not completely confused everyone
 
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Old 10-16-08, 07:00 PM
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The Benjamin Moore Waterbourne enamel is called Impervo. (It is available in both Alkyd and Waterbourne formulations.)

SirWired
 
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Old 11-11-08, 03:23 PM
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I'm planning on painting my kitchen cabinets and have decided on oil based primer & paint for the durability. I'm concerned since kitchen cabinets get so much use. Will waterborne paint stand up to heavy use. I have read everything I can on the subject and there seems to be many opinions between the new latex/acrylic vs oil based paint. By the way, how many days should I cure the oil paint before I rehang the cabinet doors.
 
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Old 11-11-08, 06:35 PM
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The waterborne term is understandably a confusing one. Actually, traditional standard “latex” paints are “waterborne” paints.

The manufacturers have settled in on the term “waterborne” to differentiate between the old type of latex paints and the new generation of latex enamels. The old are referred to as ’latex‘, the new as “waterborne”. To make matters confusining, a manufacture may still refer to an old style latex paint as a "waterborne" paint too.

The new waterborne enamels are Sherwin Williams ProClassic, Benjamin Moore waterborne Impervo, and Muralo Ultra (which was the first one I believe), there are other waterborne enamels besides these three.

The new waterborne paints have much smaller sized particles than the old latex paints. This enables the paint to form a tighter film, to level out better, and have better adhesion (because the smaller particles make better contact with the underlying substrate).. There are a lot of different acrylic resins, and the resin(s) used for the waterborne enamels dry to a harder and non tacky film

Oil based enamels are still in my opinion, harder and more solvent resistant than the waterborne enamels. Even though the waterborne paints have good adhesion, I think oil has better adhesion. BUT….. Oil enamels yellow over time (hence the term “antique white” which refers to a gold/yellow white), waterborne paints do not.
 
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Old 11-12-08, 03:47 AM
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"The new waterborne paints have much smaller sized particles than the old latex paint"

Thanks for the explaination
I always knew solvent base coatings were ground finer than latex but didn't know that pertained to the waterborne enamels. I first started using proclassic waterborne because of issues with occupational overexposure of solvents but was quickly a fan of product. I've heard some say it's more difficult to apply but as an old painter - I've never noticed. Drying quickly to a hard film makes it hard to go back to oil enamel on new interior woodwork.
 
 

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