Paint Ceilings with Semi-Gloss?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-07-08, 10:04 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Paint Ceilings with Semi-Gloss?

I'm thinking about painting the ceiling drywall with white semi-gloss. Will there be any issues with it? Will it look aesthetically pleasing or tacky? If not, will satin be fine then?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-07-08, 11:33 AM
mikeTN's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Nashville
Posts: 635
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
painting

I prefer flat everywhere except the bathrooms and maybe the kitchen. It doesn't show defects in the drywall/plaster as bad. If you are going to need to clean the ceiling periodically, I would go with satin. A little softer look. AT least I think so. It is a personal choice. Tip: using quality tools(rollers,brushed,etc..) may be a little more costly, but it DOES make a difference in the looks.
 
  #3  
Old 11-07-08, 02:05 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
A perfect ceiling [especially with the right texture] can look sharp with a sheen but the problem is, it's hard to get a perfectly level, evenly textured ceiling. Walls have windows, doors and even pictures to break up the line of sight but most ceilings have an unhindered view.

I agree with Mike that flat paint is usually the best choice for a ceiling [except in bath w/shower] but generally you can get by with a satin/eggshell enamel. What is your reason for wanting to use semi-gloss?
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-08, 08:20 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Window-less rooms or small ceilings in small rooms will look OK. Big ceilings or rooms with good lighting from widows will probably not look very good.

As already stated, the ceiling will probably not be perfectly smooth without any dips etc..

Flat is the best unless it is a ceiling that will be washed, then satin should be OK.
 
  #5  
Old 11-10-08, 11:04 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I guess I wanted the semi-gloss so it gives a shiny and help brighten the room. The ceilings are eight feet high. Another reason is the kitchen is semi-open into the living/dining room. Since I cook alot of spicy food, I'm afraid the ceiling might get dirty and needs to be washed. Should I worry that much?

Marksr, is there a difference between eggshell or satin finish compare to eggshell or satin enamel finish? Mostly like I will not use semi-gloss and use eggshell or satin instead.
 
  #6  
Old 11-10-08, 04:04 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
Depending on manufacture, eggshell and satin are very similiar sheens. Either the label or the spec sheet will give the actual gloss reflection [I think that's what it's called] but who wants to get that technical
 
  #7  
Old 11-10-08, 04:29 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How about the difference between enamel type or non-enamel type? Or maybe it's too technical where it won't be noticable to layman people? (ha ha)

Also, let's say I painted satin and it looks too shiny. If I want to change it to eggshell or even flat, can I paint it over or do I need to do something first?
 
  #8  
Old 11-10-08, 04:42 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
Enamel generally indicates a washable coating with anywhere from a low sheen to a gloss. Latex wall paints are usually in 2 groups; flat and enamels.

Satin/eggshell will usually accept flat paint well... but it never hurts to do a quick scuff sand first.
 
  #9  
Old 11-10-08, 07:18 PM
M
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Twin Cities Metro
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Talking Semi-gloss

I would use a semi-gloss for that I think it is the best choice.

--]
 

Last edited by marksr; 11-11-08 at 03:34 AM. Reason: advertising not allowed
  #10  
Old 11-11-08, 08:32 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"Enamel" is a term which is sometimes used to mean "oil" or alkyd, it is also used to mean a hard washable paint of any vehicle type - latex, oil or whatever.

The newer "waterborne" enamels come in satin or semi-gloss. These have finer sized particles than standard latex wall paints of similar sheen, which helps them to level out better and form a tighter, more washable film. (Sherwin Williams ProClassic, Benj Moore waterborne Impervo, Muralo Ultra .....)


I don't think the "light reflectance value" (a measure of the brightness of the paint color) changes with sheen, it changes with color. The color white will help you to brighten the room.

Some paint manufacturers have a bright white ("luminous white") base. These bright whites are harder to achieve coverage with than standard whites - but they are brighter.
 
  #11  
Old 11-11-08, 02:18 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,284
Received 255 Votes on 225 Posts
maybe it's light refraction ..... don't remember for sure and I don't have a data sheet handy to look it up.... but there is a measurement that tells the particular sheen of the paint at a specified angle........... but that's more technical than any of us should care
 
  #12  
Old 11-11-08, 05:30 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 203
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Marksr,
What you are referring to is simply called a "gloss meter reading". Gloss meters read the gloss level - usually at 85 degrees for flat and eggshell /satin, and 60 degrees for semi, and higher gloss paints. This is not the same at the "light reflectance value" which is tied to the color choice itself.

My reference to light reflectance value was to miloo in that he is wanting to brighten up or keep the room bright. Some paint manufactures list the LRV on their color charts. It is listed for the color itself without any consideration as to the gloss level.
 
  #13  
Old 11-13-08, 09:34 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wow, lots of good technical info (give me a year to digest, ha ha). FYI, I am deciding to use Valspar Ultra White Eggshell. Hope it will come out nice!
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: