Glidden PVA Drywall Primer. Anyone ever use?


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Old 11-12-08, 07:10 PM
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Glidden PVA Drywall Primer. Anyone ever use?

Hello,

I was at homedepot and was convinced to buy the Glidden PVA Drywall Primer on my drywall in the basement. I was going to go with the Behr Primer but the guy from Home Depot said the Glidden was better/thicker. I am using the Behr satin paint for the rooms so hopefully that won't be an issue to paint over the Glidden primer.

Anyone ever use this primer? Good?? Bad??? I bought 2 5 gallons so hopefully it will be good.
 
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Old 11-13-08, 04:01 AM
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I assume this is new [unpainted/primed] drywall. I don't know if I've used the glidden pva primer or not. Glidden makes some good coatings but unfortunately the big box stores only stock their cheapest line. It isn't just HD, all the big box paint depts stock coatings with more emphasis on price rather than quality.

Behr's reputation isn't all that good - presumably for the same reason. I know paint per gallon costs more at your local paint store but you wouldn't believe how much better looking and easier the application is when using quality coatings.

I know this isn't a direct answer but I hope it helps.
 
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Old 11-13-08, 07:51 AM
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Hi,

Yes is new drywall... the drywall was finished sanding yesterday.

Hopefully it will be good. It is the basement.... I picked the Beher satin for the basement from HD.... I have a 5gal bucket, $105 so I can't take it back so hope it is good and adheres to the primer good. now im nervous. My brother in law said I should've bought Valspar? from Lowes.... oh well. Too late now!
 
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Old 11-13-08, 11:01 AM
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Paint bought from Lowe's,especially a brand name taken over by a big box like Valspar and especially Behr,has been reworked to be price competitive while still providing small profit margins.Paint margins are generally 10-25% and by HD taking control of Behr and Lowe's taking control of Valspar and turning them into company brands it has allowed them to hold the margin while still underselling many products.This is accomplished by formula restructuring to reduce costs.

When you get into national brands you find that in many product categories the big box company can apply pressure through volume purchase and/or direct threat to stop or reduce product support levels and purchases on manufacturers to produce products under their label that through reduced quality and production values can be sold at lower pricing points.

If you're looking for better quality product especially in paint then a big box is not the place to go.

Although every paint brand has multiple levels of quality and therefore pricing,you will find better quality products at Sherwin Williams,Ben Moore,and other branded paint stores.

You will also find better lines such as Pratt and Lambert,Martin Senour etc at independent retailers.You will also find vastly superior service and knowledge levels at these stores.

This is not a bash the big box statement just a statement of fact when it comes to finding top quality paint products.There is a place in the business for lower end paint and for those who do not need high service levels.Many contractors and those who wish to save money can shop there with less time and effort and save money.
 
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Old 11-15-08, 08:09 PM
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I don't see an issue at all with using a satin Behr paint over Glidden's PVA primer.

You should remove the sanding dust from the wall/ceilings by vacuuming (HEPA or fine dust filtered and with a soft brush attachment) or with a (Norton) micro fiber cloth which you can wrap over the end of a pole sander - or by some other means before priming. Wooster also has a specialty brush for dust removal now called the "Dust Eater" attachment.
 
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Old 11-15-08, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
I don't see an issue at all with using a satin Behr paint over Glidden's PVA primer.

You should remove the sanding dust from the wall/ceilings by vacuuming (HEPA or fine dust filtered and with a soft brush attachment) or with a (Norton) micro fiber cloth which you can wrap over the end of a pole sander - or by some other means before priming. Wooster also has a specialty brush for dust removal now called the "Dust Eater" attachment.
Hi Slatz,

Thanks! Yes, was done there last night with the Shop Vac, (I did pick up those drywall filters. Excellent!) I did the floors last night with the ShopVac and tomorrow I am going to wipe down the walls and clean the floor with pine sol/water and a bucket. I will use the shopvac for the walls and wipe down with a microfiber damp and then do the floors.

Any other suggestions?!

Thanks
 
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Old 11-16-08, 03:27 AM
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All I've ever done is to take push broom and sweep off the walls and ceiling and I've never had any issues. An old brush works good in the corners and/or small repairs..... but there is nothing wrong with overkill . clean is always better than dirty!
 
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Old 11-16-08, 07:35 AM
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Thank you!

Also, 2 coats or primer, 1 coat of paint rule?
 
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Old 11-16-08, 10:21 AM
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No, 1 coat primer and 2 coats finish is the industry standard. The primer doesn't have to completely hide the substrate to be effective - it just needs to coat it all. If you tint the primer you can often get by with 1 coat of finish but the 2nd coat [of finish] will always look and wear better.
 
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Old 11-16-08, 07:51 PM
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Ditto.

One coat of primer and two coats of paint.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
Ditto.

One coat of primer and two coats of paint.
Ok, another quick follow-up... I bought a 5 gal bucket of paint inthe color we chose. We are doing the living room/hallways/beam/pole with this... I think I am going to run out... What do you recommend on how to paint the rooms? Should I do 1 room at a time and put the 2 coats of paint on? Should i do everything with the one coat and if I run out use the new paint for the 2nd?

Just afraid if I do run out, the new gallons shade of paint might be off a little?

Any suggestions/recommendations?

Thanks
 
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Old 11-17-08, 07:26 AM
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Obviously, you want to try and avoid running out in the middle of a room in a single coat. You don't need to worry about the first and second coats matching 100%.

What you do want to avoid, at all costs, is running out in the middle of a wall.

If you only have enough for part of a wall, or part of a room, go ahead and buy some more, and use your empty buckets to mix the old and new together so an entire coat on an entire room is all the same mix.

SirWired
 
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Old 11-17-08, 02:55 PM
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I don't know how accurate a big box paint dept would be but most any paint store should do a good job of matching the paint they mixed earlier. I've touched up many houses where my touch up paint was mixed at a different time.... and it matched. That said, I agree you don't want to run out in the middle of a wall. If you think you have enough paint but find out 1/2 thru the room that you will be short - stop at the corner, get/mix in a new gallon and proceed.
 
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Old 11-20-08, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
I don't see an issue at all with using a satin Behr paint over Glidden's PVA primer.

You should remove the sanding dust from the wall/ceilings by vacuuming (HEPA or fine dust filtered and with a soft brush attachment) or with a (Norton) micro fiber cloth which you can wrap over the end of a pole sander - or by some other means before priming. Wooster also has a specialty brush for dust removal now called the "Dust Eater" attachment.
Ok.... Back to the cleaning....

I used a shopvac to remove the dust from the walls.. I used a damp microfiber rag and wiped down the walls.... Starting to prime, my brother in law stops over and takes his hand, now albeit on the spackled areas where the tape/seams are, and goes across the entire seam/spackled area and his hand had some white on it... Went to another section, same thing. He said it is still dust and I should go over it with a damp cloth again. I didn't want to keep going over cause I was afraid to remove the spackle!

What are your suggestions? Do I need to go over the walls, spackled areas again with a damp cltjh and make sure no 'white' appears on the hand or since I did the above steps prior and got most of the dust off, can I just prime over it.

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-20-08, 12:38 PM
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A little dust here and there is probably ok - especially if the wet primer is able to disolve and penetrate thru it. Since I'm not there I can't say for sure if he's being overly picky or if it is a real concern. I usually take the handle off of my push broom and sweep down the majority and use an old paint brush for the corners - I've never had any issues.
 
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Old 11-20-08, 04:29 PM
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If you vacuumed and wiped with the micro fiber tack rag you should be fine. I am not familiar with the Glidden primer that you are using, but a good PVA drywall primer should wet out any residual dust after vacuum and wipe down.
 
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Old 11-20-08, 06:55 PM
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Ok, new question...

How about roller covers? What are good ones to use for first coat/second coat of paint? I am using the economy roller covers for the primer and it is not a smooth cover. I will be putting on satin paint.

Thanks
 
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Old 11-21-08, 03:57 AM
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I don't know if there are any good covers available at a big box. I buy all mine at the paint store. I almost always buy the lambs wool/skin covers but they are pricey.... and I'm old school

The help at a real paint store should be able to help you pick the correct cover for both your wallet and the job to be done. The biggest thing I remember about the el' cheapo covers is they are bad to shed
 

Last edited by marksr; 11-23-08 at 03:30 AM. Reason: add missing word
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Old 11-21-08, 07:26 PM
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Did you already use the ecconomy covers? Have you already primed?

The ecconomy covers will probably shed roller lint into the primer which will show in the finish paint. You will have to pole sand the roller hair out. Wipe down the walls again with micro fiber tack rag before painting.

You will probably get 101 recommendations on what roller cover is the best.

I will say use a high quality (expensive) shorter nap (3/8 nap for a DIY'er is good for sheen paints) and prep it before you use it. Wrap the cover with masking tape and pull it off. This will pull off loose fibers. Then you can vacuum the cover with a small vacuum attachment. Then you will be ready to roll out the finish paint.
 
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Old 11-22-08, 07:13 PM
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Question for you guys...

The beam, and pole were boxed in with drywall... Where the drywall of the pole on the top meets the beam, there is a crack all around. They guy that I had put the drywall up said there is a caulk he could put around that to fix. Is this ok???? Do you know what type of caulk that he would use.

I also noticed the corner bead of the bottom of the beam/drywall is 'cracked through a few inches. This started to show after I put the primer on. What needs to be done to fix that and will I have a problem in the future with the entire beam?!
 
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Old 11-23-08, 03:34 AM
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Not sure if I totally understand about the beam/pole. Is this a flush joint? or a corner/angle?
Generally tape and mud is used to hide the joint. If it's a angle, you could use some acrylic latex caulk - it would be a simplier fix.

The corner bead probably wasn't nailed tight enough. I'd renail and remud. .. don't forget to reprime.
 
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Old 11-23-08, 06:39 PM
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You can caulk the inside corner at the top with a paintable latex caulk, you don't need to prime over this if you are painting over it with a satin sheen paint.

The corner bead is on an outside corner. If the corner bead is cracking on the inside edge you should tape over the crack or it may return. Sometimes simply mudding will work without tape, but it is better to tape.
 
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Old 11-23-08, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
You can caulk the inside corner at the top with a paintable latex caulk, you don't need to prime over this if you are painting over it with a satin sheen paint.

The corner bead is on an outside corner. If the corner bead is cracking on the inside edge you should tape over the crack or it may return. Sometimes simply mudding will work without tape, but it is better to tape.
Thank you!

I just looked before, now this is on the bottom of the I beam and it looks like the corner bead the crack is getting bigger meaning further down the beam. IS this normal? Why all of a sudden after I primed? The drywaller is coming back so ill ask to see if he can retape. I just don't happen to the entire beam. It is only on 1 side.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 09:50 AM
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Ok, i am done proming, only 1 coat per your suggestions... I went around with a pencil and marked all of the 'inperfections' that stood out and the 'drywaller' is coming back to fix (Respackle/sand,etc). My question is, once he is done, I need to clean off the wall again and prime where he fixed? Also, I am running out of the Glidden Primer but I have a gallon of the Behr. Can I use the Behr over the existing Glidden primer in those sections I need to go over or should I go and get a gallon of the Glidden?
 
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Old 11-25-08, 10:58 AM
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Dust off the repairs and prime them - it shouldn't make any difference which primer you use unless one is tinted and the other is not. Even then there shouldn't be a problem unless coverage with the top coat is an issue.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 11:24 AM
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Excellent!!

Nope, not tinted... Both white....

My brother in law said you can use a piece off of a brown paper bag to 'sand' off once the primer is dry... he shwoed me, works good.

Thanks!
 

Last edited by marksr; 11-25-08 at 12:56 PM. Reason: removed quote
 

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