Primed over dark gray, painted white, looks blue


  #1  
Old 11-25-08, 07:59 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 33
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Primed over dark gray, painted white, looks blue

My bathroom walls were a dark gray and my ceiling was white. I primed the walls and then painted the walls and celing the same shade of white (1 coat). The walls look like a blueish white and the celing is the exact shade of white I wanted.

Should I do anyother coat or will that not help get it to a more white shade?
 
  #2  
Old 11-25-08, 10:23 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
It sounds like another coat is in order although because of the way the ceiling and walls reflect light differently, the 2 main not appear to match exactly.
 
  #3  
Old 11-26-08, 05:09 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A second coat should do the trick just fine.

Precisely what paint are you using, by the way?

SirWired
 
  #4  
Old 12-02-08, 08:07 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Huntsville Alabama
Posts: 40
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It definetly sounds like another coat will do the trick.
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-08, 06:48 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: So. California
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Paint Tips

Hi, I'm an artist and I've found that a lot of people in the paint business are taught about a bunch of "rules" that they stick to without really being familiar with the nuances of color. (even pro painters and the people who work in paint stores). Here are things to consider:

1) Reflection: color reflects from all surfaces. Horizontal and vertical. If your paint color is white on the walls and blue-white on the ceiling but it's the same paint, then what is on your floor? Your floor is directly below your ceiling, so if your floor is blue in one room and brown wood in another, the ceilings will look distinctly different in each room even if they are painted exactly the same.

What is outside your windows? Green bushes? Blue sky? Grey house next door? You may find that those things are what is making your ceiling appear a different color than the walls when it's the same paint.

2) Satin/flat/eggshell on ceiling: The shinier the paint surface, the more light will be reflected onto the floor, ceiling and walls. If you have a dark room, paint the walls eggshell and the ceiling satin. Do not listen to the "rules" the paint store people tell you. Satin on a ceiling in a dark house is beautiful and will bounce light around your room. Flat paint sucks up light.

I have a stucco ceiling in a guest bathroom I just re-did. I painted the walls light blue (the tile floor is medium blue) and I painted the ceiling with Modern Masters Metallic Platinum. I now have a shiny silver grey metallic ceiling. It is gorgeous. I have low ceilings, but they look tall. The room is now bright and cheery. When I turn the ceiling lights on the ceiling glows and the light goes everywhere. Fabulous. I get more compliments on this ceiling than anything else in my house !

(Of course, the "rule" is " never, never, never paint shiny on stucco...and never on a ceiling.....it will show everything !!!! (see below on how hard it was to convince my painter to do this).

3) Flat paint vs eggshell: Ace Sensations in a flat finish is a paint that is a scrubbable flat that is great.... No more worry about flat walls getting soiled. I used it all over my house....I think it has teflon in it...or something that resists dirt ,and staining, and water. I think the other high quality paint stores have something similar. Just ask for scrubbable flat. If they don't have it, take a color sample over to Ace and have them match it and mix one up for you in the Ace Sensations paint. It's worth it. Flat paint on walls is very contemporary and the new contemporary palette suits it really well. Don't be afraid of Flat anymore.


Making rooms look bigger:

Visual trickery:

The way to make a room feel big is to do everything to keep the eye moving around the room, uninterrupted.

How?

Paint everything in the room similar enough in value (shade....see below) to keep your eye moving around the room without stopping. (for instance, you can paint one wall pink, and one wall beige and where they meet, there will be no contrast because they are the same "value" or Shade") so the eye doesn't stop there...it just reads it as "the same."

The eye will stop where the darkest darks meet the lightest lights.
There should only be ONE PLACE where the contrast is the most noticeable, and where the eye stops dead..........at the Focal Point.....period. Otherwise, if the eye scans the room interrupted constantly it will read as "cluttered, small, cramped, busy."

4) If you have dark walls, paint your ceilings a few shades lighter....into the neutrals......don't use white. Especially not if your room is small, or has low ceilings. High contrasts like dark against white take away volume from the space and make it look smaller. (see above)

Stark white moldings and trims and ceiling, and chocolate walls only look good in a large room with high ceilings. (I don't even like it then, actually).

Chocolate walls with off white or ivory trims and a light beige ceiling look great in a small room with lower ceilings. Use taupe and ivory fabrics in a soft hue so the darkest thing in the room is the walls and floor. The loor should be medium to dark to make the walls feel grounded. If the floors are light, use a dark area rug to ground the space.

Remember the rule about dressing with black and white? (top heavy shape does not apply to this) ....Dark shoes, dark pants, light tops. ... make you look taller, and slimmer in the legs and hips. Same with rooms. Darks should be on the bottom (closest to the floor....on the floor and walls,) and lighter up to the ceiling.

If you have white carpet, don't do dark walls unless you bring the dark to the floor somehow, with rugs or.....the dark walls will never feel "grounded." (think white shoes with black pants).

5) Color value: There is something similar to color hue, or shade, and it's called value. A blue, red, and yellow can be different colors but the same "value." This means one is not darker than the other in the spectrum. Think pastel. Pastels all mixed together go really well. But imagine all pastels and then one really dark color. The eye will go right to that darkness, and if it's not in just the right amount and in the right place in the room, it can read as "doesn't go."

Stick to all the same values in a room if you want to visually create a feeling of space in a room. For low ceilings, this is especially helpful. Remember ...the eye stops where the darkest dark meets the lightest light. If you want to make a ceiling feel higher, don't make the eye stop at the intersection of the ceiling and walls with a stark contrast....like a medium blue wall and a stark decorator white ceiling.

6) If you really want to know about color, ask an artist, not a paint store clerk. Even some professional painters will tell you never to paint a ceiling shiny. I almost couldn't get my painter to use the shiny Metallic paint in my bathroom on the ceiling. After he warned me a hundred times to no avail he painted it. Guess what? He is astonished at how good it looks.
 
  #6  
Old 12-12-08, 04:03 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 385
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The biggest problem most house painters have with painting a ceiling anything but flat has nothing to do with how bright it will make a room look or not look. It has to do with the fact that ceilings are commonly not finished to the same standard as walls, and it is more difficult to achieve even paint application on a ceiling.

Flat paint helps to conceal defects in the surface or coating application.

SirWired
 
  #7  
Old 12-12-08, 04:19 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,072
Received 398 Votes on 354 Posts
To add to what Sirwired noted above, even when the ceiling is finished to a high standard, most ceilings don't have any breaks like you do in a wall. On a wall there are door/window openings to break up the line of sight, not to mention any pictures and such hung on the wall.

With the exception of bath rooms, I'd inspect the ceiling before painting any sheen other than flat and would advise the customer accordingly. I wouldn't want my customer to be surpirsed if the ceiling didn't really look better after painting.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: