Removing paint from Pool Coping

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Old 12-18-08, 01:51 PM
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Removing paint from Pool Coping

The previous owners decided to paint the concrete pool deck and also the brick type coping that goes around the pool. It is peeling in a lot of places so we would like to strip it back to it's original state which is a very light brown. I think the deck is painted with a stain type product. It does not appear to adhere well to the coping but it is really stuck onto the cement. We like the cement color, a grey/white and will repaint that. What kind of product should I use to strip the coping around the pool?
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Old 12-18-08, 03:07 PM
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That might be a hard one to answer

Do you know if the coating is latex? or oil base?

Latex should be the easier of the 2 to remove. Products like 'goof off' and 'oops' are the least caustic and might work [only on latex] A solvent like lacquer thinner may work as will most any paint and varnisher remover/stripper. I suspect it would be best for you and the pool to limit the use of either of these two.

A lot of it will boil down to old fashion elbow grease ........ and it may be a job to keep both the chemicals and paint chips out of the pool.
 
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Old 12-18-08, 06:43 PM
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I have a 1/2 gallon of the stuff. I will test for latex/oil tomorrow. The label is missing from the can but I think I know that it was bought at the Sherwin Williams store. I'll do some investigation.
Maybe the pressure washer will be able to help get it off too.
 
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Old 12-19-08, 04:08 AM
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If it is peeling the PWer will get a lot off but the paint chips will go every where.
 
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Old 12-19-08, 07:01 AM
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Wink

This doesn't answer your question to the best of my knowledge but it is somewhat related and an alternative.

Sandblasting.

Iíve never really removed to paint from the coping; at least not deliberately. Iíve only done one pool about 20 or 30 years ago. It was my fatherís pool and it was white marblelite. We used a sandblaster to remove the paint from the pool wall and bottom. The pool was about 20 years old when we did it, so the coping was about 20 years old; and it was cracking, starting to dry rot. So we scraped it out about two inches deep then we caulked over it was something that the local pool supply recommended.

The best paint we ever used was epoxy, it was still in good condition 10 or 20 years later. The latex paint that we tried seemed to start peeling within a matter of months and was rather pathetic within a couple of years. After we sandblasted we used the more expensive the epoxy paint.

The paints that we used were the same color as the marblelite, so if the paint peeled off it wouldnít be that noticeable other than clogging the filter.

We sandblasted, then scraped out the coping, then painted with epoxy, then replaced the coping with caulk.

Fortunately we never painted the concrete deck or sidewalk. I would think paining it would be slippery, somewhat gaudy and higher maintenance.

I sandblasted a flagpole also to remove the rust and old paint.
 
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Old 07-04-09, 08:00 AM
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The trouble with sandblasting bricks is that you'll break the glaze, allowing water to infiltrate the brick, and unless you live someplace where it never freezes, the bricks will delaminate in the winter.

Have you tried muriatic acid? Chances are you have some already for adjusting your pH, and directions for acid washing brick should be on the label. It should be safe for the brick, in the appropriate concentration, but if it doesn't remove the paint, try something else other than using more concentrated acid.
 
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Old 07-04-09, 12:04 PM
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It never freezes here. That is real nice.
We decided to cancel the project and leave the coping the way it was. We tried paint remover but it was a hige job.
 
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Old 07-04-09, 03:22 PM
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fyi - muratic acid won't remove paint.
 
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