How to apply color glaze

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Old 01-03-09, 09:13 PM
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How to apply color glaze

Hi all,

We recently painted a wall yellow and it turned out way too bright for us. We are going to darken it up with McCloskey Special Effects Translucent Color Glaze (Burnt Sienna) and am getting differing instructions from Home Depot reps on how to apply it. One said we don't need to mix any yellow paint with the glaze and the other said we did. It seems to me that this glaze shouldn't be mixed with any other colors since it's already a Color glaze. I thought we could just apply it to the wall by itself.

What is the right answer?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 01-03-09, 10:33 PM
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The word translucent gives you sort of an idea of the appearance of this glaze. There won't be much of a pigment or solidness to it alone. I'm not certain what process you are planning to use to apply the glaze. Having done many faux finishes, I have found the best way to find the look you want is to apply a base coat of paint on a poster board. Section the poster board off into 4 parts using tape. Apply the glaze as is onto one section in whatever technique you plan to use, then measure out a very small amount, such as a tablespoon of one part glaze to one part yellow base paint, mixing them together. Then using your technique, apply this mixture onto one of the other sections. You will get the idea of what they look like without messing up your wall. If you don't like neither section, just experiment with more or less paint or glaze or another color added to change the tone. Use a blow dryer to dry each section, as they will dry up looking totally different than when wet. If you decide to go with one style which called for adding paint to the glaze, make sure that each batch you mix up is the same as the one before. Also make sure that when you start on your wall, don't stop until you finish the whole wall or you will have stop and start marks. Never work your glaze in a perfect pattern on the wall, always move around randomly, staying in the same area but sorta like the shapes of puzzles or shapes of continents. This makes the wall look more uniform, each section that you did, will blend in. I hope this helps you decide which way to go. good luck
 
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Old 01-04-09, 06:34 AM
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You can apply the tinted glaze to the wall directly without adding any paint to it.

I would suggest ragging it on -a little at a time until you have the look you are striving for.

Wear vinyl gloves. Dip a soft cotton rag into a pail containing your glaze, ring the rag out and bring it to the wall.

Ragging is done in a "pat and scoot: manner. This looks better than trying to place "prints" on the wall with the rag.

Paint a piece of illustration board or a scrap piece of drywall or something similar in your yellow paint color, then practice with the tinted glaze on it before attempting it on the room itself.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 06:40 AM
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This answer may be frustrating to you, but both reps are correct.

There is no right or wrong when it comes to glazes. It all works. Each variation gives different results. Like art - the beauty or ugliness is in the eye of the beholder.

I'll give a little more depth here. Many paint stores will have examples or brochures so you can get an idea of what the finish will look like.

Glazes will give you a faux finish look. This can be similar to old world frescoes to random patterns, a leather look, a satin look, etc. This may not be what you want. If you are only looking to tone down the color, perhaps just repainting is a better option.

You will need to experiment a little to see what works for you. Start with a ratio 4:1 glaze to paint. You could start with 2:1, but I think that is still too much yellow. If you're happy with it, you are done. You may want to try 15:1 ratio to see what it looks like. This 15:1 can be applied over the 4:1 for good results or directly over the painted wall.
You can also apply the glaze without any paint added.

By starting with 4:1 and then putting 15:1 over it, you create a colorwash effect.

To apply - again you have choices. I think a roller is too heavy. A brush will give interesting results, especially if allowed to go dry - ie, applied unevenly. You can also take an old brush and cut the bristles short for a different look.
A sea sponge works well. Dip it in the paint and daub on the wall.
Rag rolling is another option. You can roll the glaze on and then rag roll it off to remove some of the glaze or rag roll it onto the wall to apply.
Work in small sections. Don't try to do the whole wall at one time. I use a chamois but I suppose anything would work.
Another idea is apply with a regular brush and then stipple with a dry brush - a regular painting brush or large artist brush. Try twisting the wrist as you go. Use a 3" or larger brush. A smaller brush would work, just take lots longer.

Don't fret about it either. There is no right or wrong way to do this. It will look great no matter what.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 06:47 PM
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Wow, thank you, Everyone. I really appreciate the thorough answers as I'm a rookie. I am feeling a bit overwhelmed, so I appreciate the reassurance that I can't mess this up too badly! I'd love to knock it out in one job, but know I can always paint over if I mess up.

As for technique, I was thinking of using a brush to create x's in small patterns and then use a soft brush (or free rag that I already have on hand, preferably!) to blend. I'd love a color wash effect to balance out the brightness. The Burnt Sienna I bought should add some punch to the color. I want a very subtle look whatever I use to apply it. Any additional thoughts on that?

I've just looked at youtube videos on color washing and it seems like a few used the paint brush and then rubbed it to blend. I'd love the easiest method that a true rookie can make do with! I do need the glaze to stretch a bit as I don't want to go out and buy more bottles. This stuff is expensive for a stay at home mom and a teacher dad!

Thank you, again! This is an awesome forum! I appreciate the terrific advice and the time you've taken to help.
 
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Old 01-04-09, 07:33 PM
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Another thing...if I use a rag to rub/blend it, do I need to dampen the rag a bit with water or just use a dry rag?

Anything else I'm not thinking of? I'm sure there is!
 
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Old 01-07-09, 10:43 AM
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Wetting a rag depends on the method you have chosen to put the glaze on. You spoke of using a brush making X patterns. If you choose this way, do not rub/blend it with a wet rag. Reason being, when you are using a brush, you are pushing the glaze around, pretty much dry brushing, working the glaze to the appearance you want. If you take a wet rag and rub it around, it will pull the glaze off what you just did and leave ugly spots. If you have to use a rag to remove any excess on the wall, use a dry cloth. If you chose to do the faux with a rag alone, there are 2 ways to do it. Roll the glaze onto the wall and use dry rags to pull it off, but it will still leave a pattern on the wall, depending on how much you remove. Or if you apply the glaze on with a rag, then dampen the rag, not soaked, then load the rag with glaze. Apply rag to wall, twisting your wrist continuously. You will also need to re crunch your rag again and again. As you move along, you will see whether you want to smooch it out move for less pattern or leave a distinct design. I'm guessing you would want the smooch look for this particular effect you are going for.
This could be a simple and easy option for a beginner: Get one of those body sponges that are circular. I'm not talking the sponges sold for faux. They are about 5 in. wide by 3 in. deep. Dampen and use it to apply the glaze mixture. If you smooch it around, twisting and pushing the glaze on the wall, it will give the same effect as colorwashing. It is much easier to work with it than criss-crossing with the X pattern with a brush. You can use a small brush and dry brush the glaze into corners and edges.
I like to use a small, 5 in. roller and roll some glaze onto the wall in a zig zag, irregular small pattern on the wall, don't cover the entire area in this pattern with the glaze, leave bare space as well. Then take your damp sponge and just start smooching and working the area all around until you've pushed the glaze into the entire pattern area you created. Continue in this manner until you complete an entire wall. Of all ways to faux, this is the easiest and fastest way to get the job done. The appearance of the finished wall looks somewhat like the design of marble, only without the lines running thru it.
 
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