Painting a repaired area of wall

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Old 01-25-00, 08:53 PM
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I just repaired a spot on my wall and want to repaint it to the original color of Off White. Will applying fresh paint make that area stick out like a sore thumb? Any suggestions on how to best paint this area without having to repaint entire room.
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Old 01-26-00, 05:34 AM
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First prime the repair with a good primer. Kilz, Zinsser, and Benjamin Moore all have good primers.

If you don't have any of the original paint, the new can of paint may be off a shade. It is almost impossible to get identical shades from 2 separate cans of paint. Thats why one should mix multiple cans of the paint together before painting a room.
 
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Old 01-26-00, 06:31 PM
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Other things to consider:
You may have to also alter the texture on the wall where the patch has been made. For example, If the wall was painted with a roller, more than likely there is a small stipple texture there due to the roller cover. Your repairs have probably been sanded smooth and there is no texture there. Using a brush only to repaint the patched area may give you a differnet look even if you have the same color and the same original paint. By using a roller cover if you can, or using a brush and "softly slapping" it on it's side, on the wall, instead of "brushing" with the brush, you can create enough stipple texture without getting out the roller cover. If you do not want to try "slapping" you can use a brush as it was meant to be used, but let the brush marks go toward the strongest light source. If you spend more time in this room durring the day, and your repaint area is near a window, make the strokes go toward the window. If the room is used mostly with the use of artificial lighting, take your strokes toward the light source where ever it is. The reason for this is that the light will cross the brush strokes, causing shaddows, making the painted area look slightly darker, if brushed at a right angle to the light source. Brushing toward the light source will allow the light to go down through the strokes and not casting any shaddows. Also feathering out the edges of your painting will help.

------------------
Larry Plummer
5824 Corydon Ridge Rd
Georgetown, IN 47122
1-812-949-3013
[email protected]
 
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