Why thin the paint

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  #1  
Old 02-11-00, 07:07 AM
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I stopped by my mom's house while she was having the living room painted. I noticed the painter take paint from the can (Benjamin Moore) and pour it into his work can and then thin it slightly (maybe an ounce or two) before starting to paint the window trim.

I was surpised by thinning it. The plan was to try and only use one coat (something I can rarely achieve). Wouldn't thinning require more coats of paint - not less? I understand that it would probably go on thinner and maybe produce a smoother finish. I still think that it would need more coats.

what's going on? Is it normal to thin paint before doing the trim?
 
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Old 02-11-00, 07:02 PM
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well being a BM Dealer I hope I can answer your question.
It really depends on which product is being used, if the painter is using alkyd products it is Ok to thin a little if you need to get the paint to flow out smoothly, Bm does not recommend thinning because of the Current VOC regulations, but it does not hurt if you thin an ounce or two, providing you use the appropriate thinner for the product used.Latexes can be thinned also, but you are correct that the paint may not hide as well and may require a second coat. This is really the painters preference to thin down his product to get what he is trying to acheive, If you are not getting one coat coverage don't feel bad, It may depend on the colors you pick or the products you use. Benjamin Moore makes no claims that the paint is one coat coverage for the reason that it is only a claim, and they have no control over how a person applies products. Also BM does not shade it's products to produce better hide, like some brands do.

[This message has been edited by Ron Raley (edited February 11, 2000).]
 
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Old 02-12-00, 11:45 AM
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Thin it with what?
Did he use floretrol or other such paint conditioners. This is what he may have used for more open time especially if it is winter where you are and the humidity level is too low in the house which would cause the paint to dry too fast. The slower the dry time the better the adhesion.
Rainie
 
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