Painting enamel over enamel


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Old 02-15-09, 08:22 AM
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Wink Painting enamel over enamel



Morning all, I want to paint a lighter color oil based

enamel over an existing oil based black enamel.

Yeah I know

I know enough to "rough up" the surface and to use a primer,

but I would like to know exactly what primer to use, and

should I use a deglosser first?


I would like to do this as simply as possible......

Thanks much, Jackie R.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 08:33 AM
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Hello, really no priming is necessary, if you are going over the surface with the same product, just sand it well and paint it! Easy as it gets!
 
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Old 02-15-09, 08:57 AM
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Smile Wow




Couldn't get much easier than that could it? I was

anticipating a long messy job.

Thanks, Jackie R.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 10:28 AM
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Welcome to the forums Jackie!

Is this on the exterior? or interior? What is the new color? You might want to use a primer [maybe tinted] to help with coverage. Another dark color may cover the black ok but light colors may give you coverage issues.

As long as you lightly sand and remove the dust, you won't need the deglosser. Most any oil base stain hiding primer will work. If you do primer, you have the option of switching the top coat to latex or waterborne - if you so desire.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 12:43 PM
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enamel over enamel

Thanks Marksr.

This is a love seat that is part wicker, back and sides, and the frame is wood, it is interior.

The new color would be a much lighter enamel, so if I gave it two coats of the oil based primer, letting it dry throughly in between coats, would that possibly eliminate having the black bleed through?

I guess the only way to really find out is "just do it"

Again, thanks, Marksr.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 06:52 PM
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I am a union painter, and the only thing that priming will do is eliminate multiple finish coats. If you think that two coats of finish paint will cover the darker color then do that. Unless, the item is really in bad shape (peeling, cracking, damage) then priming is good. If its in good shape priming is just a waste of time and money. Going over the finish with the same product is fine.

Thats the deal with people these days, all these commercials about kilz priming, have better, brighter colors are a joke. Like I said priming in any case is only necessary if you surface is banged up damaged, brand new, or you are switching from a oil to a latex.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 07:45 PM
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You don't have to prime for adhesion, but I would prime for a different reason than those already mentioned.

I never like to put on two coats of oil enamel, the second coat will re-wet the first coat causing it to set up too quickly keeping it from leveling out as nicely as the first coat.

I would block out the black with a couple of coats of BIN (shellac primer). Sand the BIN smooth and remove the dust, then put on one full hiding coat of enamel. BIN won't be re-wetted by the oil enamel, so it will not set up too quickly allowing it to level out very nicely.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 10:46 PM
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Why Oil?!?

Hi Jackie,
I'm curious...
Why are you gonna use another Oil?

Once you've primed with BIN, you're ready to rock with a top-quality Latex paint.
Much easier to be around, and it won't yellow over time.
Oil paints are gonna be getting scarcer...soon.

Last year, ACE has discontinued most of their Oil's production.

(We can hardly GIVE away our remaining Oil paints....)

Faron
 
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Old 02-16-09, 04:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
I never like to put on two coats of oil enamel, the second coat will re-wet the first coat causing it to set up too quickly keeping it from leveling out as nicely as the first coat.
If this happens, you are recoating too soon! The 1st coat of enamel should be dry enough to sand before applying the 2nd coat. It's good practice to sand in between coats of paint - especially enamels.

I agree that most diyers use primer more than neccessary but in this case [dependent on color used] a primer might aid in coverage with a need for fewer coats of enamel. If you believe 2 coats of enamel will cover - skip the primer, otherwise a primer is probably benificial.
 
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Old 02-16-09, 06:19 AM
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If this happens, you are recoating too soon! The 1st coat of enamel should be dry enough to sand before applying the 2nd coat. It's good practice to sand in between coats of paint - especially enamels.
Actually, it can happen even if you wait the prescribed time between coats as per the label. A freshly applied (but dry) oil paint is still sensitive (and re-wetable by) to mineral spirits, as it cures and oxidizes it becomes more resistant to solvents.

Shellac is not reducible /thinned by mineral spirits and therefore is not sensitive to it.

Faron79's question (and marksr's suggestion) is a good one to consider. Unless there is a good reason to use oil (and there can be a good reason in certain situations) it may be better to use a waterborne enamel, particularly if your new color is light or close to white.
 

Last edited by Slatz; 02-16-09 at 07:23 AM.
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Old 02-20-09, 06:42 AM
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Thumbs up Enamel over enamel

Wow, I never expected so many responses.....and I am sorry I didn't reply earlier, but, I am almost to the end of building a new home, and as I am sure you all know that can be a very stressful

I have been convienced by all of you to use a latex, to not do two coats of enamel, and I am really impressed with all of the very professional responses.

Thanks so very much to all of you

I have posted another question regarding overspray on windows......help anyone?

Jackie R.
 
 

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