exterior house stain


  #1  
Old 06-11-00, 06:46 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question


I had the exterior of my house painted with a solid colour stain 1 1/2 years ago. The paint is now flaking/peeling off on the wall facing south east. The old stain had not peeled but was only weather worn after 10 years of so. The house was power washed and sanded before painting. I hired a contractor to do the work for me. The paint company tells me I could have a moisture problem. (The paint company has already supplied me with enough new stain and primer to redo the house) I don't want to be in this same situation in another 1 1/2 years. Any suggestions?
 
  #2  
Old 06-11-00, 08:12 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Since you mentioned primer i'm assuming the newer stain is latex. Most latex stain that would need a primer are not very good. The latex stain to use is a waterbourne acrylic. I would start by looking under the flaking stain and see what is under there. Like mildew or alot of sanding dust. Then decide is the wood full of stain, will the stain soak in ? if it is full then go to a paint. I would reconsider using latex stain.
 
  #3  
Old 06-12-00, 01:22 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

I checked the paint brochure for the old stain and it was an acrylic stain. The new product recommended by the paint company (Cabot) is called Finish ,it has Teflon in it and is supposed to resist everything (but then again so was the previous stain)
Any thoughts in this?
 
  #4  
Old 06-13-00, 07:02 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

The product you are talking about is a paint

from www.cabotstain.com:

The Finish with Teflon Surface Protector is a premium quality, 100% acrylic, low-lustre exterior paint for all trim and siding surfaces. Due to its superior adhesion, The Finish bonds to clean glossy surfaces previously coated with oil/alkyd or latex-based paints and enamels, without requiring priming or sanding

I'm not to sure about this product. it says no primer needed, but i like oil-base primer on bare wood. could you see anything under the peeling ?

 
  #5  
Old 06-14-00, 01:59 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

quote:<HR>Originally posted by Big Jeff:
The product you are talking about is a paint

from www.cabotstain.com:

The Finish with Teflon Surface Protector is a premium quality, 100% acrylic, low-lustre exterior paint for all trim and siding surfaces. Due to its superior adhesion, The Finish bonds to clean glossy surfaces previously coated with oil/alkyd or latex-based paints and enamels, without requiring priming or sanding

I'm not to sure about this product. it says no primer needed, but i like oil-base primer on bare wood. could you see anything under the peeling ?
<HR>


 
  #6  
Old 06-14-00, 02:02 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question



Oops, sorry about that. You can tell that I'm not only not paint savy but I'm not entirely computer savy either. It's funny that you should mention it, but there is no paint under the places where the stain/paint is flaking off? What is this a sign of? A moisture problem? Or that a primer should have been used?
 
  #7  
Old 06-14-00, 06:30 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

I personally would use an oil primer on the bare wood.
 
  #8  
Old 06-15-00, 07:15 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

A customer was kind enough to let us know our product was mentioned here. Thank you very much. Hopefully, we can offer some information here that might clear up any confusion. The Finish with Teflon Surface Protector, a 100% acrylic paint, offers excellent adhesion characteristics and will bond to many surfaces without a primer. That being said, we do recommend an oil primer (we offer and recommend Problem-Solver Primer) on new, bare or weathered wood. Primers perform many functions, including resistance to extractive bleed and providing a better surface for topcoats to bond to. Simply, primers can help coating systems to last longer.

Most peeling situations are caused by moisture or inadequate surface preparation. Big Jeff’s recommendation to look under the flaking product is a good one. The intent here is to determine what, if any, contaminants could have caused an adhesion issue. More often, moisture that has infiltrated the siding will cause peeling to occur. It is common to see this problem on a southern exposure as it’s actually the sun’s heat energy that causes the water to be drawn to the surface. When the water hits the wood/coating interface, it will push even premium quality coatings off. Corinne, from your comments, it sounds like we have done an investigation for you and given you an explanation, as well as recommendations. If we have not been complete in this effort, or if you need a better explanation on any part of the process, please call us at 1-800-877-8246. We’re happy to help in any way we can.
 
  #9  
Old 06-15-00, 06:41 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Cabot stain is probably the best stain on the market. Go with Cabot stain!!!!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: