Help with a paint nightmare


  #1  
Old 06-28-00, 08:12 PM
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I recently purchased a home where the previous owners painted the exterior with a latex paint on fir siding. Now after a year the paint is pealing all over. It looks as if there was no primer used. Just paint on wood. There is "sap" bleeding through the paint also. What should I do? Pressure wash,Paint with oil primer, then latex? If I do this won't the primer on top of the old latex paint just peel off again? HELP!
 
  #2  
Old 06-29-00, 04:13 PM
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Yes i would do that. But just prime the bare wood and the bleeding areas
 
  #3  
Old 06-29-00, 08:48 PM
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Hi:gsmith

My Two Cents Worth.
Hold on a minute there G. Smith.
Your on the right track with your thinking.

Unless you like painting your house every year or two, try the following methods.

First, as you mentioned, you will have to sand and scrap off as much of that old peeling paint as possible. Then prime the wood with a high quality oil based exterior primer.

Next, repaint over the primer with another coat of high quality exterior flat. The flat coat will adhere to the oil based primer better then a latex paint.

Then finish with the final color coat you want using a high quality exterior latex paint. The final latex coat will adhere to this flat coat better then it would if applied directly to the primer.

The above method may seem like lots of extra work but you already can see what happens when the job isn't done correctly.

Good Luck,
TomBartco
 
  #4  
Old 06-29-00, 09:59 PM
mikejmerritt
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TomBartco,With the statement<Next, repaint over the primer with another coat of high quality exterior flat. The flat coat will adhere to the oil based primer better then a latex paint.>Do you mean to use oil primer then flat latex and then a top coat with sheen if desired?Three coats in all?Does sound like the ideal way to me if I understand you.....Thanx for reply.
 
  #5  
Old 06-30-00, 11:47 AM
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Hi:mikejmerritt

You got it Mike.

3 coats applied exactly as I stated for the exterior.

First the oil based primer, then the flat <I use a flat color close to the color of the finish coat but plain white is okay.> Last is the finish coat.

To answer your question regarding the finish coat, yes, any type of finish coat will adhere to the flat.

If your really into it, apply two coats of flat on the primer. Then apply the finish coat.

In case your wondering if this method is used inside the house. Answer is YES!

However, when painting the interior, only one coat of the wall sealer and primer. From then on, all repaints get two coats of flat and one coat of finish only. No wall sealer or primer is needed.

I am aware of the claims made that one coat can cover. <So called one coat coverage paints.> In my opinion it's Bull Biscuits!

For several reasons.

#1
The existings gloss or sheen paint has to be lightly sanded all over to dull it or the new gloss or sheen coat covers poorly.

#2
If you paint every two years you might get away with one coat coverage. However, most of us don't paint the interior this often.

#3
If you want a truely good looking and long lasting interior paint job, a flat first on the existing paint is the only way to go. Two coats of flat are better!

Using this method does take lots more time, paint and work, granted. However, in my experience and opinion, the job looks much better and lasts longer.

Good Luck,
TomBartco
 
 

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