What do I use???


  #1  
Old 06-29-00, 02:22 PM
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We just bought a house and are trying to paint, etc. The kitchen was painted with lead paint, satin or semi-gloss (not sure which). There is wallpaper over it, which I've been slowly removing, probably at great risk (lead).

From what I've been able to find out, I need to use a deglosser or something called Wil-Bond before painting, since sanding is out of the question. Can I use latex, or do I have to use oil since the lead paint was oil? I have bad reactions to oil-based paints.

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 06-29-00, 09:20 PM
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Hi:Beth W.

I am not going to offer you much in the line of professional advice regarding the wallpaper removing or repainting of the walls. I'll leave that part to the pros.

What I can tell you unequivocally, the prior coats of paint containing any lead will not cause you any harm. Unless you ingest <eat> the paint. Of course, I highly doubt your going to do that.

Regards,
TomBartco

 
  #3  
Old 06-29-00, 10:09 PM
mikejmerritt
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If you leave the paste residue it will have to be oil primed to keep it from bleeding through your new paint.If you remove paste and have existing oil paint you will have to oil prime to use latex wall paints for finish coats.It seems to assure a lasting job you are in for at least one coat of oil.A fan pulling fumes outside may help with your reactions to oil if you have a door or window open on each end of the house.
 
  #4  
Old 06-30-00, 02:38 PM
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My SIL had a similar problem with a house she just moved in to. After thorough clearning, we painted the walls with KILZ (BIN is also another brand name of a similar product). It's a stain blocker that also acts as a bonding agent between whatever was there before and whatever you're going to put over it. As with your project, sanding was unthinkable. It left a nice neutal basecoat.

Then we papered over that with a textured wallpaper from Home Depot. It's semi-transparant and comes in lots of designs. We used a basket weave pattern.

Next step was painting the wallpaper a buff/beige color using a standard roller. After allowing that to dry, we went back over with an almost dry brush using a copper color.

Her kitchen now looks like expensive woven wallpaper. The buff/beige color is highlited by the copper.

Best of all it was a fairly easy job and easy on the wallet. Only 3 steps -- prime with Kilz, paper, then paint. It took us only one weekend and cost about $100.
 
  #5  
Old 07-03-00, 10:58 AM
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Everyone seems to be hung up on kilz. I used it until approx. 2 years ago and at times had to use 2 coats to obtain stain coverage. Plus, it stinks. I have started using Ben. Moore Fresh Start primer and have had excellent results. The directions say that it can be applied over glossy surfaces but I lightly sand it first. It is available in latex or an alkyd mix. It gives me good coverage on one coat.

 
 

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