High-Build Primer


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Old 03-21-09, 12:16 PM
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Angry High-Build Primer

I'm renovating my walk-out basement and though using high-build primer could be a great idea to achieve a uniform sheen/texture despite the many transitions from previously painted wall to drywall repairs and new drywall.

I bought SW's Builders Solution Surfacer which is expected to be one of the best things on the market ($$$). One is supposed to spray or roll it on with a thick nap and then back roll. SW claims "exceptional smoothness." It sounds great, doesn't it.

The reality is quiet different. First, I found out quickly that if you back roll with a regular nap, you will end up with stucco. I experimented with different naps and found that high-density foam provided the smoothest texture (but still rougher than a usual painted wall). At least, that primer does indeed seem to prevent joint photographing very well.

My problem is the following. Even with the smoothest back roll possible, the high-build primer will show all roller strokes and these will show through two coats of paint as well (the roller induced texture does not reflow and dries very thick). I tried two coats of high quality paint on a small area and the sheen non-uniformity was awful (much worse than photographing). I tried sanding the high build primer down to a uniform sheen but the latex based formula makes this impossible.

I need to fix this somehow. Something that goes on thick to take care of the textural non-uniformity but does not create problems on its own. Suggestions?

From the above experience, I would highly discourage anybody from using the SW's Builders Solution Primer. The Prep-Rite High-Build Primer may be fine as it dries much thinner than the Builders Solution does (thus not filling in wall imperfections as well but probably reducing the roller marks issues I experienced).
 
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Old 03-21-09, 06:32 PM
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Skim coating with drywall compound will work for sure. There may be another solution, but skim coating will work.
 
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Old 03-22-09, 05:14 AM
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I'll admit that I may not have ever read the label on SWP's hi-build primer but I've sprayed a lot of it with decent results - I've never back rolled.

I agree that skim coating with joint compound is the way to correct the mess you wound up with. Once the j/c is dry and sanded it will need priming. I'd suggest using the promar 200 or 400 preprite primer.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 03-22-09, 07:46 AM
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I don't think you needed specific a high-build primer for this application. I have much the same situation, and simply rolling the whole wall with Prep Rite Pro Block Latex has provided plenty of blending stipple.

SirWired
 
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Old 03-22-09, 11:09 AM
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Sounds like roller stipple is not acceptable to you. If so, a skim coat of joint compound sounds like the best option.
 
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Old 03-26-09, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by sirwired View Post
I don't think you needed specific a high-build primer for this application. I have much the same situation, and simply rolling the whole wall with Prep Rite Pro Block Latex has provided plenty of blending stipple.

SirWired
Second this option, but you may find better texturing results if you prime the wall first, then use the high build for blending textures, another option after priming is to thin the high build to suit. The idea of priming first is to have a uniform surface, suction wise.

Bill
 
 

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