kilz paint


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Old 03-25-09, 11:15 AM
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kilz paint

I was told I could buy kilz paint and have it tinted to the color i want and then i wont have to clean the walls. They are very, very dirty. Is this true.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by tlopez View Post
I was told I could buy kilz paint and have it tinted to the color i want and then i wont have to clean the walls. They are very, very dirty. Is this true.

The only way paint can be washable is if it has some type of sheen with it. To be honest the kilz brand is a very low end paint and will not be as washable as a premium paint.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by tlopez View Post
I was told I could buy kilz paint and have it tinted to the color i want and then i wont have to clean the walls. They are very, very dirty. Is this true.
I believe the OP meant the walls are currently dirty not the ability to clean after painting.

There are no real alternatives to cleaning an excessively dirty wall.You should scrub them down with TSP,rinse behind that, then prime with a decent quality primer.Latex based would probably be fine but since the walls are overly dirty you'd want a stain blocker to be on the safe side.

I agree that any product under the Kilz label is low end.Kilz has high name recognition but not high performance levels.It is one of those product lines that has become promotional and price point driven.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 02:15 PM
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Smile

Kilz used to make a line that was colored but it didn't sell well since it is only meant to be a sealer/cover paint and not a finished product. Even if you used the kilz, you should paint over it with a finish paint!
 
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Old 03-25-09, 06:12 PM
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The dirt on the walls could keep your new paint from adhering. I think someone steered you wrong (of course, we righted you here).
 
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Old 03-28-09, 04:28 AM
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The cleaner the surface, the better the paint/primer will adhere. Sometimes it isn't feasable to completely clean the substrate. At those times, a solvent based primer is usually recomended.

When Kilz first came out, it was a great alternative for pigmented shellac when the superior hiding/bonding of shellac wasn't needed. While the original oil base kilz is every bit as good as it was then, the introduction of newer better primers, makes kilz a not so good choice.
 
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Old 03-30-09, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
The cleaner the surface, the better the paint/primer will adhere. Sometimes it isn't feasable to completely clean the substrate. At those times, a solvent based primer is usually recomended.

When Kilz first came out, it was a great alternative for pigmented shellac when the superior hiding/bonding of shellac wasn't needed. While the original oil base kilz is every bit as good as it was then, the introduction of newer better primers, makes kilz a not so good choice.
This is exactly correct. Zinsser Stain Kill was formulated for interior use, to kill difficult stains that continued to bleed through primers, both oil and latex..ie knots in wood, water stains, magic marker, and the like. Even professionals were careful to apply it properly on small areas because it set up so fast. Kilz was formulated to be easier to apply for homeowners and larger areas, interior and exterior, but it was never the stain killer that Zinsser was, sometimes taking two or three coats to do what Zinsser would do in one. So as was said, there are much better primer products on the market today...
 
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Old 03-30-09, 01:37 PM
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Tlopez,

I came across your question on this thread and would like to offer some advice to help with your project. Preparing the surface you are about to paint is extremely important. I would recommend doing the following steps.

Wash off any dirt, grease, or oil build-up with a household detergent. Rinse thoroughly and remove all loose paint. Patch holes and cracks with patching or spackling compound. Allow to dry and sand smooth. Be sure to wipe off any sanding residue with a damp cloth and let the surface dry.

Dull any surface with a visible gloss or sheen by scuff sanding with medium grit sandpaper. Prime with an Interior Primer and Sealer, and then apply an Interior Latex Paint in the color and sheen of your choice.

Matt
Kilz
 
 

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