Peeling Paint

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Old 03-25-09, 03:09 PM
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Peeling Paint

I have walls that are a mixture, some are sheetrock and a couple are old plaster. I primed with Kilz because some areas had old paint that needed covered. Then painted with Olympic Premium from Lowe's and it's had plenty of time to cure. When I masked the Olympic paint with the blue painter's tape to paint woodwork, the wall paint lifted in sporadic areas. CR_P! From what I read, my mistake may have been using Kilz. Not sure. Should I prime over these areas with something like Zinseer or just lift as much of the loose paint as possible and reapply the Olympic? What's the best way to get the new paint to blend with the old?
 
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Old 03-25-09, 03:26 PM
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How much time did you give it to cure? Latex paints can take a month to develop adhesion.

If the adhesion is "spotty" it may be a good sign, it may be starting to bond. It also could be a bad sign.

Is it the primer that is pulling off? Look at the back side of the paint "chips" and observe the color. Look at the surface that the paint is coming off - is it glossy?
 
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Old 03-27-09, 12:29 PM
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re. Peeling paint

The back side of the peel appears to have primer on it, no color. It looks like it has the same texture as the wall. some of it pulls loose down to the smooth plaster. I had a couple of guys do the painting for me (working too many hrs to do it myself at the time) but I didn't tell them to thoroughly vacuum the wall first so I suspect there may have been a lot of plaster dust on the wall from having the plaster refinished. I just pulled some loose and when I rub the back side of the peel, it felt dusty so I'd guess either the old plaster is decomposing or the walls weren't clean enough.
 
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Old 03-27-09, 01:16 PM
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Sounds right, preparation is the most important part of the job, but the most boring, washing, sanding, patching, priming, is 80% of the job...

Bill
 
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Old 03-28-09, 05:23 AM
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IMO vacuming is over kill but the sanding dust must be removed. I like to use a push broom [minus the handle] but most anything to brush/wipe off the sanding dust will do. Since the paint peeled, including primer, improper prep is the likely cause.

I don't use the latex kilz because it has poor stain hiding properties. It is also reported to have adhesion issues. Tape can always be problematic when applied to fresh paint. That is one of the reasons us pros rarely use tape.

Can't say for sure without being there but if the gloss can be sanded and any dust/chalk removed, there shouldn't be a need for primer prior to filling in the low areas. Once the affected areas are filled with spackling or joint compound, sand, dust and prime. generally fresh paint touches up fairly decent but it can vary among different brands. Flat paints usually touch up better than paints with more sheen. Corners will touch up better than spots in the middle of a wall.

hope this helps and welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 03-29-09, 11:40 AM
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I have re-read you original post more closely.

I have known for years that new primed drywall compound will often not pass a standard tape test. The problem is normally not with the primer adhesion, it is with the weakness of the drywall compound itself. The compound is too weak to resist tape pull off. What is happening is you are actually pulling apart the drywall compound.

If you look at the back side of the primer chips you will see fairly thick (3 or 4 mils) of crystalline-like drywall compound attached to the back side of the primer.

Some compounds are worse (weaker) than others. The light compounds are more likely to have this problem.

If this is the case, you will need to use a easy release masking tape and gently pull it off.

Additional coats of paint will help to distrube the stress from tape pull off and diminish or eliminate the pull off problem.
 
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Old 03-30-09, 06:39 AM
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And of course, eliminationg the use of tape will help enormously. Pros that use tape will also tell you, as soon as you're done with the tape, and/or at the end of each day, remove it!

Bill
 
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Old 03-30-09, 08:54 AM
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Additional coats of paint will help to distrube the stress from tape pull off and diminish or eliminate the pull off problem.
Should read:

Additional coats of paint will help to distribute the stress from tape pull off and diminish or eliminate the pull off problem.
 
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