Refinishing stained trim?


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Old 03-25-09, 08:11 PM
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Refinishing stained trim?

I need some help. I live in a house that's about 25 years old. One thing I really like about it is it has a natural trim all through the house. The bad part is it's 25 years old and needs some attention. I'm sure what I've got is pine trim that's been stained and then coated with polyurethane.

Here is my question. I love the natural trim but I'm not too crazy about the color. Is there any way to darken the color without stripping all the urethane off? I would like to go with something darker that would match my furniture better.

Any idea's? I've seen that Minwax Polyshade stuff, but I'm not sure if that's what I want or need. I definately don't want to strip this stuff. Nor do I want to cover it with paint.

Here is a picture of what it looks like now.

Thanks in advance!

 
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Old 03-26-09, 07:52 AM
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Assuming the surface of the trim is in generally good condition etc polyshades or a similar product would be the best easiest way to go.You'd need to clean the trim well to be sure to remove anything like kitchen grease,nicotene,residue from a heating system or fireplace etc.Wipe it down with mineral spirits,rags and maybe even 4/0 steel wool.You'd also want to scuff sand any area with a gloss or semi-gloss finish to aid in adhesion then follow can directions.Remember that any color on a chart will be on light colored wood chips and will be darker against your color trim.
 
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Old 03-26-09, 01:54 PM
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And try to touch up the poorly matched putty in the nail holes before brushing on the shaded varnish....

Bill
 
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Old 03-27-09, 09:39 AM
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A shading varnish will work, so will a "wiping stain".

A wiping stain is a highly pigmented stain, they work great for toning and shading. The advantage to using them over a shading varnish is that you will have a lot more working time.

I recommend Old Masters Wiping Stain for this. Apply the stain with a brush in the direction of the wood grain. Use a second "dry" brush (a white china bristle brush) to soften the stain and to eliminate brush marks, brushing in the direction of the wood grain. Be sure to do a good clean job at the joints where the wood grain changes direction.

Be sure the previous wood stain is squeaky clean and sanded lightly before shading to ensure good adhesion.

Using a wiping stain as such will take a couple of days to dry hard enough for final clear coating. Be sure it is dry before clear coating or you will dissolve it with the varnish over top.
 
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Old 03-28-09, 05:05 AM
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I would never recomend using a wiping stain over sealed wood! Stains need raw wood so the color can be obsorbed. Applying stain over a sealed surface almost garuntees the stain will lift when varnish/poly is applied with a brush.

Tinted poly like minwax's polyshades is a good way to alter the color of finished wood. It can be ticky to apply. Lap marks, runs, puddles, etc will all show darker and thin spots will be lighter. polyshades shouldn't be over brushed or touched up. Once you are finished with the tinted poly it is a good idea to apply a coat of clear poly to protect the color coat from wear.
 
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Old 03-29-09, 11:54 AM
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Wiping stains are made for going over sealed wood (they can be applied to raw wood also). They are far easier to use than shading varnishes. Wiping stains are also used for wood graining (over a sealed coat of "paint"). I use wiping stain all the time for toning sealed wood finishes over to a different shade.

Shading varnishes because they dry so quick are hard to do a clean job in joints and where the wood grain changes direction.

Penetrating stains are not suitable for going over sealed wood

See Old Master's website for instructions for using their wiping stain. http://www.oldmasters.biz/directions...ngStain_PI.pdf
 
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Old 03-29-09, 12:07 PM
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Can't get that link to work but I have a suspicion what this basically is is a tinted version of a wipe on polyurethane or something similar to that.If I'm right then yes it would work.That said any stain that does not have poly or a similar material as a component would not work over a poly finish.

Once a surface is sealed with a polyurethane,lacquer,shellac or similar no plain stain will work as regular stain must be able to penetrate the wood to function.
 
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Old 03-29-09, 03:36 PM
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There are two types of stains used by professionals: (actually there are a couple of others but that is a subject for another day.....)

1. Penetrating stains

2. Wiping stains (they are similar to gel stains)

Wiping stains don't really penetrate very much, for this reason they are easy to control. They are highly pigmented stains that lay on the surface of the wood (sealed or not sealed). They have been around for years.

You can simply google Old Masters and navigate to the wiping stain from there - if you can't get the link to work. (the link works on my computer) Try this link: Old Masters | Wood Stains | Wiping Wood Stain
then navigate to "directions for use".

Once a surface it sealed a penetrating stain won't work, but a wiping stain will. I have done it many many times. They are not the same as a shading vanish either - which are primarily clear coats with a "cast" of color to them.

Unlike a shading varnish, wiping stains dry to a flat finish that needs to be clear coated over.

A wiping stain is closer to a wood graining glaze than it is to a shading varnish.

I have used both shading varnishes and wiping stains and in my opinion shading varnishes can be difficult to use. They can look sloppy in corners and in joints, and they are prone to lapping. Wiping stains will do a much cleaner job because you have a lot of more open time.
 

Last edited by Slatz; 03-29-09 at 04:14 PM.
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Old 03-30-09, 03:38 AM
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I think we have a difference in what a product is callled in different areas. Here a penetrating stain and wiping stain are conisidered the same but according to the link you provided, a wiping stain is similiar to a gel stain.

Although I knew what you reffered to, I've never heard a tinted poly [varnish] called a shading varnish.
 
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Old 03-30-09, 06:35 AM
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The down side of masking over a finish with a stain or shading is that you begin to loose the clarity and beauty of the wood. A nice even application is best done with a spray gun, but that may not be an option in some cases. The down side of uneven application by wiping or brushing, resulting in lapping and blotchiness, can make a bad situation even worse. An oil based shading varnish applied with a bristle brush in cool conditions, probably will yield the best results., As stated before, do touch up and blend your miscolored putty before starting. And do lock in your work with a clear coat to protect your repairs.

Bill
 
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Old 03-30-09, 08:01 AM
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I understand. Terms can mean one thing to one person and another to someone else.

BTW: A "shading varnish" is a generic term for a tinted varnish. Hence Minwax's term "Poly-Shades" meaning a "shading - polyurethane"

You can shade with a varnish, lacquer, urethane or whatever clear coat you wish to use.....

P.S. hopefully not lost in some of this dialog is Bigg-Billy's point. Whenever you shade over a stained finish (with whichever method you choose) to re-color it, you will lose a lot of clarity and detail of the wood grain.
 
 

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