Smooth finish with semi-gloss trim paint on doors??


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Old 04-01-09, 10:07 AM
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Arrow Smooth finish with semi-gloss trim paint on doors??

Hi,

I have a nice quality "green" semi-gloss enamel for painting some interior flush (smooth) doors. It's especially important to get as close to a sprayed-on finish as possible because the doors are just big slabs. I can't do any spraying though.

I've been told that a foam roller is the way to go, but when I had one in the past it had a seam that left a mark every revolution. Those 59 cent foam brushes cover badly too.

So what is the best way to get the job done? Are there high quality foam rollers?

Thanks guys!
 
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Old 04-01-09, 12:06 PM
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I've never cared for the foam covers, I don't know if they come in different grades/quality.

The lines may have been a product of poor rolling technique. You don't want to bear down on the roller or try to squeeze all the paint out onto the substrate. You should keep the roller cover wet and gently roll the paint out after you've covered the entire door.

It's been a long time since I've rolled any masonite or luan doors. I always prefered to use a 1/4" mohair cover with oil base enamel [not sure how well they work with latex]

Is your enamel oil base? or latex?
Oil base enamels tend to flow together well although using an additive like penetrol will slow down the drying time and help it to flow together better. With latex you can use products like floetrol to slow down the drying time.
 
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Old 04-01-09, 02:11 PM
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Noooo... this is green paint... no oil!

The roller I had used had a seam you could feel. It was like a rock stuck in a tire tread that you hear every revolution. f I was bearing down that hard the ends would have left trails too.
 
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Old 04-01-09, 06:43 PM
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You can only do so much with a true "green" paint.

If you want to push the limits a bit, use a waterborne enamel and you can get a real smooth finish.

You will roll the paint on with a fine 1/4' nap roller (vacuum and tape the roller prior to using it to remove loose fibers).

Roll the paint on and then "lay it off" lightly in the direction of the wood grain with the tips of a good brush.

The waterborne enamel will level out 1000% better than a "run of the mill" paint (green or not).

Use the same procedure with a green paint - you just won't get the same smoothness, but it should be OK.
 
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Old 04-02-09, 06:45 AM
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I forgot to mention that one of the challenges is that they are smooth (no simulated grain) fiberglass doors that are preprimed and not supposed to be scuffed up. So, it's almost like painting on glass...
 
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Old 04-02-09, 05:24 PM
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You can't expect a sprayed on look without spraying but that doesn't mean you can't have a nice looking paint job on them. Generally rolling and then 'tipping it off' with a brush looks best - as described above. If you have trouble with that method, a light orange peel from a 1/4" roller doesn't look bad - just make the paint even and roll it out lightly.
 
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Old 04-03-09, 06:51 AM
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Can someone please explain exactly what "tipping it off" or "laying it off" is?
 
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Old 04-03-09, 06:59 AM
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Simply put, you apply the paint with a roller, and brush it properly as if you were applying with a brush. Which has been said, "laying off in the direction the grain would be, if it was a wood door." Applying with a roller for a novice provides for much more even film thickness, especially on flush doors. Then lightly brushing the stipple that is left by the roller so that it looks like the more professional brush finish. I prefer foam roller, which if used sometimes leaves a bubble stipple that is easily removed by lightly "tipping off." But as one said, nothing is better than a spray job if you want to leave no trace as to how the paint was applied.

Bill
 
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Old 04-03-09, 04:08 PM
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"exactly what "tipping it off" or "laying it off" is?"

That is when you use just the tip of the brush to even out the paint, removing the roller stiple.
 
 

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