Painting over Varnished Wood Mouldings

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  #1  
Old 09-21-00, 08:34 AM
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I need to paint baseboard mouldings that have been previously stained and varnished.

I DON'T WANT TO SAND & PRIME !

Is there a ONE-STEP way to do this ?? We want a WHITE HIGH-GLOSS finish....is there a paint product that will adhere to the varnish? How about oil-based paint ?
 
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  #2  
Old 09-21-00, 03:32 PM
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I am sorry but being a profesional painter I would recomend the 2 things you don't want to do. If you are wanting a smooth finish there will be no way around light sanding (180 or 220 grit), and you might as well prime it for paint adhesion and to prevent bleeding, then you can use a quality oil or water based paint (I suggest oil, because of vacuum cleaners, feet, brooms, etc.)

If you want it to look nicer, use a paintable latex caulk and calk around the wall and joints using a wet finger to smooth, unless you have wallpaper then just the joints. After priming and before painting.

Don't forget to clean any oil, grease, dirt before you do anything.



[This message has been edited by Chipfo (edited September 21, 2000).]
 
  #3  
Old 09-22-00, 03:42 AM
mikejmerritt
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mbarrack, You have received A+ advice from Chipfo and would advise his methods. To address your question as it has been put to us, if you will, as Chipfo suggests "clean any oil, grease, dirt before you do anything" perhaps finishing by wiping with mineral spirits you can get by with using a waterborne enamel that will bond without primer and may to a large degree cover in a coat. Waterborne takes 7 days to fully cure, but is dry as you may find out in 15 minutes, so watch that vacuum for a week as far as scraping the base. Also, w/borne has no stain killing properties so anything that would bleed through latex paint will come through in a few days if not hours...Mike




[This message has been edited by mikejmerritt (edited September 22, 2000).]
 
  #4  
Old 09-22-00, 07:10 PM
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Chipfo, let's be forward here, oil or latex primer? Oil or latex top coat? What kind of paint? These 3 questions need 3 direct answers. Be the opposite of Al Gore and give me good solid answers. Thanks for your opinion, I'll take your advice into consideration on a job I have this winter. Thanks, JDX...unregistered
 
  #5  
Old 09-22-00, 08:30 PM
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I would recomend an oil primer (I did fail to mention that didn't I), Ben. Moores Impervo for topcoat and it is an oil based paint.

Actually on my jobs I spray a white lacquer undercoater, it sands easily and ultra smooth and dries very fast, then I top coat it with 2 coats of Impervo, thinned about 1/3, and use a good finish tip like a 4-10 or 3-11 reversible. The finish is so smooth, that if a fly lands on it, he will slide right off the end. I don't recomend the white lacquer to the do it yourselfer because it has to be sprayed and is an advanced coating more for the pro's, it is to easy to make runs and sags and is very toxic expecially when sprayed, we where full body clothing and resporators, vaseline on any exposed skin, eyelashes and brows(unless you want the white mascara look ).

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May I ask what the job is and consists of? Maybe I could be more specific. I have seen you in here many times, do you have an airless, HVLP, cup gun or conventional rig?

[This message has been edited by Chipfo (edited September 22, 2000).]
 
  #6  
Old 09-23-00, 03:20 AM
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Thanks for the info.. The job is an old Victorian ( 1850 ). The problem is both of the home owners are cancer survivors and they don't want to be around/living in the fumes for 3 weeks. All the old woodwork is varnished and polished. The 1st step is to dull that surface for proper adhesion. The homeowners understand I may need to use an oil primer. I was going to use 2 coats of AquaGlo Benjamin Moore for the top coat. Another reason we were not going to use oil was to get away from the yellowing that occurs ( color will be barely an off white ). Thanks for the helpful nuggets. Throw another my way......
 
  #7  
Old 09-23-00, 04:52 AM
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You may want to check with Sherwin Wiliams, they have a line of low odor paints made for hospitals, they even have a low odor oil primer, I forgot what brand it is. As far as the oil primer yellowing, if it a quality primer and topcoated with a quality paint it shouldn't yellow, it will yellow if not topcoated or maybe with a cheap paint.

I have known people to use latex on trim and etc. If you prime with a good oil primer and use a good latex trim paint, it should be ok as long as it's not a high "wear and tear" area. You have the right idea about sanding first, and for better results lightly sand the primer coat with a 220 grit before painting. If you are brushing, paint the baseboards last, so any dirt or dust, carpet hair, etc. you may pick up wont be transfered to anything else.
 
  #8  
Old 09-23-00, 08:35 AM
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The only part I was really worried about yellowing was the top coat if I used oil for the top coat. I'll check out Sherwin Williams line of interior low odor. Right now I'm on a job where we are using Benjamin Moore on the house and Sherwin Williams on the porch floors. The S.W. is working great and the Benjamin Moore is always nice to use. I haven't used to much SW but I can see why so many use it.
 
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