Primer -- Oil or Latex?


  #1  
Old 10-20-00, 07:13 PM
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I've heard two opinions on the primer I can/should use on the outside of my house.

1. Always prime in oil base. You can paint latex over it fine.

2. If you're ultimately going to paint with latex paint, you have to prime with a latex primer.

Which is accurate?
 
  #2  
Old 10-20-00, 07:18 PM
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To be safe #1 is always correct; #2 reminds me of something Al Gore would say- it's not the truth.
 
  #3  
Old 10-20-00, 07:27 PM
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Either oil primer or latex primer will take oil or latex paint.
For exterior I prefer to use oil primer and latex paint.
Just make sure both primer and paint are for exterior.

--------------------------------------------------

I mean that "Generally", be sure to read the specific can and make sure. I don't know about ALL coatings, but for the most part what I stated above applies. There are some paints that require you to use there primers, but this is mainly specialty coatings, not to confuse you.



[This message has been edited by Chipfo (edited October 20, 2000).]
 
  #4  
Old 10-21-00, 02:42 AM
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Guess I should have also mentioned that this is "repainting." So I've scraped and cleaned the redwood-siding that's already been painted before.

Still OK to prime with Oil and paint w/ Latex?

How many coats of primer and how many exterior coats do you recommend?
 
  #5  
Old 10-21-00, 03:48 AM
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Use one good coat of alkyd oil primer and two top coats of latex.
 
  #6  
Old 10-21-00, 04:43 AM
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Yes, I agree.
I personally, on repaints, just spot prime the bare spots, if there are a lot, where spot priming is not the answer then complete priming may be nesasary, then 2 coats of latex paint.

If it is close to the same color as the existing paint, you can possibly spot prime, one coat of paint on the spots primed, and then paint all. This will work for low sheen or flat paint, semigloss may require 2 full coats to look right.

Be sure to use a quality paint from a pro paint store, the cheaper paints will save you money now, but not in the long run.
 
  #7  
Old 10-22-00, 02:43 AM
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OK to use good quality paint that's two years old? (Never been opened before.)

Shows just how long I've been well-intentioned to paint my house!
 
  #8  
Old 10-22-00, 05:18 AM
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What is the brand of paint you are using?
 
  #9  
Old 10-22-00, 06:51 AM
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Sherwin Wiliams A-100. (Both the primer and the latex.)

 
  #10  
Old 10-22-00, 07:05 AM
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Hmm. Primer still seems tacky on the siding, though it's cool and damp yet outside. (I confess, I was priming in the dark last night when it was about 53 degrees.)
 
  #11  
Old 10-23-00, 04:33 AM
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A-100 is an excellent exterior house paint, I am not sure what the "shelf life" would be on un-open cans, if there is no info about shelf life on the can (I don't have one handy), you can call Sherwin Williams and find out. I wouldn't just blurt out that it is 2 years old, but ask them if they could look up the shelf life.

Never paint over tacky primer
 
  #12  
Old 10-24-00, 05:20 PM
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Wrong.There is no harm in painting over slightly tacky oil primer. I was told this by a Benjamin Moore rep. when I had a question about it.
 
  #13  
Old 10-24-00, 07:08 PM
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I could possibly see painting a latex over an oil based primer while still slightly tacky, but I wouldn't recomend it. But if you paint a latex over a latex or water based primer while it is still tacky then you will run the risk of mixing the colors, same with a oil primer and oil paint. If you try to paint an oil based paint over tacky water based primer, well I wouldn't even attempt that, you will pull the primer right off and mix it in the brush or roller.

Even when spraying, i wouldn't recomend painting until the primer is dry, if you are going to lightly sand the primer coat it has to be dry, well this could go on and on. No, I wouldn't just go by the reps advise, not this time.

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Oops, I just saw that you did mention oil primer, I just saw "slightly tacky primer", I didn't notice the "oil" till now.

[This message has been edited by Chipfo (edited October 24, 2000).]
 
  #14  
Old 10-26-00, 04:19 AM
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It finally seemed to dry. And since I'm doing this when I can after work, it's had a good four days to set up before I put the first topcoat of Latex on.

Good suggestion on checking the shelf life.

Thanks.

(My wife wants to know why painting latex over varnish or other oil base inside is a big no-no, and yet I can do it outside...)
 
  #15  
Old 10-26-00, 06:08 AM
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Most of your oil based primers are made to take oil or latex paints (Always read the label to make sure), this goes for inside or out. It is oil based paint or varnish you don't want to top with latex paint without proper prep, this also goes for inside or out.
If you are wanting to paint latex over oil based paint or varnish you must first sand lightly, reprime with an oil primer then paint with latex. There are latex paints that will adhere fairly well to oil paints, but there are also latex paints that won't, so to play it safe I always recomend priming oil paint or varnish with an oil primer prior to using latex.

[This message has been edited by Chipfo (edited October 26, 2000).]
 
 

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