re-painting brick steps


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Old 05-13-09, 07:58 AM
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Red face re-painting brick steps

I will be re-painting previously painted brick steps on an old house. Is there a paint that will work that won't leave them so slippery?
 
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Old 05-13-09, 01:06 PM
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There are specialty non slip paints and grit paint additives for non slipping.

Both would likely only be sold in paint stores,real hardware stores and maybe online.Also probably can be ordered if not in stock at hardware stores.

Also there are various tapes used to give grip to steps etc.3M is the big name in that field.
 
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Old 05-13-09, 05:09 PM
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Do you know what type of paint is currently on the steps? what kind of condition is it in?

The grit additives work well but the areas that get the most traffic - that is where the grit will wear off first.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 05-17-09, 07:15 AM
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Personally, I've found the non slip granular sand stuff to work the best. Depending on the weather in your area..if it rains alot or gets really cold, the sticky grip strips tend to lose their stickiness and come off easily.

Go to your local paint store. You'll find 'silica sand' in a small bottle, about the size of a vitamin bottle. Usually you don't need much, doesn't cost much, goes a long way. 'Silica' is non reactive so won't do anything to paint. Bottle has holes in the top like a salt shaker.

When painting, as soon as you finish applying wet paint to each tread of step, sprinkle silica sand on like you would salting french fries. Not too much though. Wait for paint to dry. The sand will stick into the paint. When you put second coat of paint on, it will seal in the sand and leave a gritty textured finish that is very 'no slip'. If you think it looks too gritty, you can put another coat of paint on that will level things out a bit more.

Like Marksr said, high traffic areas are where the grittiness will wear off more quickly. However, painted steps wear anyways over time and the effort of a tread repaint every few years won't seem like much after a few slips and falls.

Quick add note: More grittiness means dirt will get caught on the steps a bit easier as well if that concerns you. Less grittiness=less dirt.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 08:42 AM
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Two things to add here:

1. I always mask out a stepping pad so that the texture is always where you feet will go leaving an inch of non gritted surface against the riser, and then as necessary to provide a nice look and always just have the grit just where you need it. I mix the grit with the paint and brush it on within the taped area, then pull the tape off.

2 Then paint the whole step area, thus encapsulating the grit under the paint, again the best look.

Bill
 
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Old 05-17-09, 09:17 AM
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Now that's a great idea for giving it that 'pro look'! Never tried the masking idea before. Only customers I've done this for were elderly people who wanted the grit everywhere they could get it. They'd have made me put it on the hand railings and bathtub if they could!

Bill, I've tried mixing the sand into the paint before applying but didn't have great success. Kept finding the sand would settle in the paint too quickly and couldn't get consistent coverage. First time I tried it I ended up with paint mud/sludge. Not good. That stuff ended up in the 'paint to try and find a purpose for later' pile of cans. Opted for the sprinkle method after that. It just seemed easier to apply and to roll out the treads once the sand/paint coat was dry.

Either method I'm sure will work, once you figure out your technique.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 06:53 PM
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You might want to try larger grit if you are getting the sludge effect. 10-12 particles per inch is plenty to give traction. On commercial jobs, and party boats, guys are using truck bed paint to create a pad, and then painting over it with the finish color, works great as well.
 

Last edited by marksr; 05-18-09 at 04:11 AM. Reason: remove unneeded quote
 

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