Is there a paint scraper on the market that is known as the best?


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Old 05-14-09, 11:45 AM
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Is there a paint scraper on the market that is known as the best?

need to scrape the outside of my house this summer and I'm wondering if there is a particular paint scraper on the market that is really kick butt and better than the rest???
 
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Old 05-14-09, 11:57 AM
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There are many many scrapers out there and I'm sure almost as many opinions.

Hyde makes some really good ones,well made with better grade blades etc.

It's not always easy to find upper level tools in a store inventory.Might try paint stores and real old time hardware stores.If you have an Ace hardware near you they can order in what they don't have in stock and get it within a few days.Ace stocks a large variety of Hyde products as well as many others.
 
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Old 05-14-09, 12:18 PM
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The ones I like are Red Devil or Allway I think, they have a blade with 4 scraping edges, so that you can rotate it three times as the edges get dull, then you will also need a file to resharpen them. Note the angle the file needs to attack the blade at before you start, so that you'll have an idea when the edges become dull.

Bill
 

Last edited by Bigg_Billy; 05-14-09 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 05-14-09, 12:23 PM
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They also make scrapers with carbide blades that will keep an edge for a long time, but they can't be re-sharpened, and the blades aren't cheap. Easier as BB said to just keep a small mill file handy.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 06:30 AM
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I've tried many different scrapers over the years. I haven't found any of the steel blade scrapers useful as the blades dull far to quickly. I would strongly second the suggestion of the carbide blade scrapers.

A few years ago a friend of mine and I took on a job of repainting a heritage house with cedar shake shingles covering the whole thing. The paint was in horrible shape and was peeling all over. Had to go over everything with a scraper! House was huge and took us almost a month to prep everything before we could paint.

Not sure if you have a Lee Valley in your area, but they make the best scraper I've ever used. Carbide blade needs to be changed eventually, but it will last a long...long time. I think Lee Valley sells online as well, maybe you can order them.

Another suggestion I found helpful was to individually wrap your knuckles with hockey tape. Scraping can be very tiresome on a big job and eventually you're going to slip and rake your knuckles over the surface to be scraped. After watching all the skin on my knuckles being deducted from my overall skin inventory, I figured this out.

Seriously though, carbide blades are the way to go. Can't sharpen them, but in the long run the added cost will far outway the time spent fiddling with steel blades.

AND WEAR A MASK! PLEASE!
 
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Old 05-18-09, 06:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Bigg_Billy View Post
The ones I like are Red Devil or Allway I think, they have a blade with 4 scraping edges, so that you can rotate it three times as the edges get dull, then you will also need a file to resharpen them. Note the angle the file needs to attack the blade at before you start, so that you'll have an idea when the edges become dull.

Bill
The key when scraping is not to damage the wood, which tends to happen when scraper blades become dull. Even the carbide blades become not so sharp, fast, and the fact that you can't take a file out and touch them up leads to damaging/gouging the wood. Price for a 2.5" carbide scraper is around $40 at Jamestown, you can buy 4 regular 4 way steel blade scrapers for that. Carbide is nice when you are scrapeing boat bottoms, copper paint for the most part, where nothing can dull the blade, for houses I'd go with regular steel, and a file.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 07:23 AM
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Probably a dumb question but do I need to scrape the entire house down to bare wood or just the paint that is loose and peeling?? Are there any tips for scraping and not damaging the wood? Thanks.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 07:25 AM
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Anyone ever try one of these?
Wagner USA [Wagner PaintEater]

I've seen the big Pro models that are similar, but I believe they used a carbide bladed disk. Seems like this might be nice for a homeowner.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 02:36 PM
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Originally Posted by noskills77 View Post
Probably a dumb question but do I need to scrape the entire house down to bare wood or just the paint that is loose and peeling?? Are there any tips for scraping and not damaging the wood? Thanks.
Just scrape the loose/failing paint.

SirWired
 
 

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