Bad paint job from previous owner. TIPS please, and spryaer advice. PICS


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Old 05-19-09, 04:23 PM
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Bad paint job from previous owner. TIPS please, and sprayer advice. (PICS)

Hi-

Just to give a little background.
I am a 31 year old DIYer. I once worked a summer as a student painter a decade ago, and have also painted many, many rooms in the last 2 homes that I have owned. My current home I have lived in for 2 years and I'm ready to finally paint the exterior. I hate BEHR paint, and only use SW for my projects. Something about the buttery texture as it flows from the brush makes me very happy

Everything the previous owner did was half-assed. Everything!
When he painted the exterior aluminum siding he used a sprayer and only did one thin coat. He painted white and you can still easily see the dark green color of the original siding. AND HE OVERSPRAYED EVERYWHERE!

On the soffit and under the rear porch roof, he used a brush and very very sloppily "painted". Again, thin paint and brush strokes.





So onto my questions.

1. How can I clean off the paint on the brock front of the house?
I really do not want to paint the brick, and would prefer to clean the surface good. Should I try TSP through a power washer with a scrub brush attachment, or will something like KRUD KUTTER power wash detergent work? Once clean, then just use a paint stripper like Citristrip?

I have never used TSP before.

2. Because of the detail and texture of the soffit and porch roof, I would like to use a sprayer. I have never used one before. I was at a local auction house a few weeks ago and bought a brand new, never used Wagner PaintCrew 660 fro $40. I know that it is not a top of the line sprayer, but will it work well for this project? If so, of course I would also like to use it for the siding.

I have already purchased the paint. Sherwin Williams Durations, tan color.
SW said that the paint is self priming, and will not require any primer. Is this correct even for aluminum siding? The previous thin layer of paint appears to have adhered well to the siding.

And yes, the guy did paint the deck brick red and then paint "mortar lines" on the wood....
 
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Old 05-20-09, 04:01 AM
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First off you should clean everything you plan to paint. TSP is a great cleaner but I don't know if it's good to run it thru a pressure washer. I never run any chemicals thru my PWer, I apply the cleaning agent[s] with a pump up garden sprayer. If you have any mildew to clean off, you will probably need to use a bleach/water solution. With a little luck, the PWer may remove the paint off of the brick - but be carefull not to force water behind the siding! A wire brush along with detergent might help.

While I've done a good bit of spraying, I've never used any of the wagner line of sprayers. I suspect you might have to thin the paint in oredr for a small pump to spray properly - you will have to try and see. Masking and/or using a paint shield is a good method for keeping overspray off of where it don't belong. Spraying isn't as easy as it looks so it might take some practice. Under the carport/patio might be a good place to start. Don't forget to cover up the slab and all the brick.

Generally when I paint aluminum siding, I don't use a primer. After a good cleaning [and drying] I'll spray 1 coat of a quality latex house paint with emulsa bond added. The emulsa bond helps the paint to adhere better and will counter act any chalk that didn't wash off.
 
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Old 05-20-09, 06:59 AM
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Well, for the drips, some high-quality stripper should do just fine. It would probably be less harsh on the brick than pounding the heck out of it with the PW.

SirWired
 
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Old 05-20-09, 07:59 AM
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Thanks.

I wasn't planning on trying to blast off the paint with the pressure washer. I really do not want to damage the brick or knock out the mortar.

My plan was to load the detergent tank with TSP or Krud Kutter PW Detergent. Though, it sounds like the better option is to use the pump sprayer and then just scrub. I have never used TSP before. Do you really have to SCRUB with elbow grease to clean, or does the solution do most of the work? Really my house just has general grim on it, like dirt, dust and pollen. No major stains.

I do not have Mildew anywhere on the house. My home gets plenty of sunlight for it to not be a problem.


I have also never used emulsa bond or Floetrol before.
I am using Durations Exterior Semi Gloss. Would you still recommend a conditioner or bonding agent?
I have noticed no chalking, but since the siding was painted 3-5 years ago, I am not sure if it would be present or not.

I test painted a few spots with some Durations interior paint (just to see if we liked the color) and both seemed to flow and adhere well to the siding.

I think that the sprayer is a higher quality sprayer then just a handheld, but again since I have never used one, I won't know until I get started and test it out.

YouTube videos and epinion reviews make it seem easy, but you never know.

thanks-
 
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Old 05-20-09, 12:07 PM
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TSP is a non sudsing version of Spic & Span, it is for washing not stripping. To strip the brick, it is going to be a brick by brick afffair in order to do a nice clean job, for the mortar, I would buy some latex flat paint in the color of your mortar and draw it in with a small brush, rather than try to strip it. To strip the bricks, tape them off, you can use Citristrip, but I suspect 5F5 will be better here, experiment and see, 3 coats of stripper and medium steel wool, should clean them off, wipe with denatured alcohol and move on, once you have a system, it won't be so bad, same with the random spots. As for spraying, if your unit is a cup gun and not airless, and you have to thin the paint to get it through the guy, 2 coats will be necessary. As suggested when spraying, cover up well, and pick a windless day, or you'll end up duplicating your last painters antics, and perhaps paint a few cars in the neighborhood.

Billy
 
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Old 05-20-09, 12:32 PM
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If there is no chalk, there probably isn't a need for emulsa bond. If you run your fingers across the existing paint and some color comes off on your fingers - you need to address the chalk.

Floetrol slows the drying time down a little allowing the paint to "flow" together better. Basically it's a latex paint thinner that doesn't thin the paint - it just acts like it's been thinned for application purposes. I don't know if adding it to the paint will make it spray any better. I seldom use it.

TSP is a good cleaner and it does most of the work although it won't make a dent in the overspray without plenty of elbow grease. As noted above, there are better products for removing the overspray.
 
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Old 05-20-09, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
If there is no chalk, there probably isn't a need for emulsa bond. If you run your fingers across the existing paint and some color comes off on your fingers - you need to address the chalk.

Floetrol slows the drying time down a little allowing the paint to "flow" together better. Basically it's a latex paint thinner that doesn't thin the paint - it just acts like it's been thinned for application purposes. I don't know if adding it to the paint will make it spray any better. I seldom use it.

TSP is a good cleaner and it does most of the work although it won't make a dent in the overspray without plenty of elbow grease. As noted above, there are better products for removing the overspray.

Sorry if I was a little confusing in my line of questioning.
Really, I am asking several different questions. Concerning TSP, my question was regarding the general cleaning of the brick surface and mortar, for appearance sake, and then for the cleaning of the aluminum siding prior to painting.

My line of thinking is as that I will clean the entire house with TSP to prep for painting. Asides for the paint drips, the brick just looks old and dirty. Ideally, I do not want to paint the brick, though after painting the hole house, I do not want the front to look ****ty in comparison with the rest of the house. if I can get the brick fairly clean, then I will try and tackle the overspray.

So, after painting the 3 aluminum sides, I (really my wife) will decide whether or not to paint the front brick.

Here is the existing vs. proposed.


And here is the Wagner PaintCrew 660.
"The Paint Crew is a piston pump sprayer with the performance of a contractor sprayer yet designed for the homeowner. The paint crew uses standard reversible spray tips and comes complete with hose, tip and metal spray gun. For additional detailed information on the Paint Crew"

# 2750 PSI piston pump
# .2 GPM
# 1/2 HP
# 25 Foot hose
# Reversible 413 tip
# 2 Gallon hopper
# Metal spray gun
 
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Old 05-20-09, 07:46 PM
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You won't remove overspray from brick with TSP.

As for general brick cleaning, there are commercial brick cleaners on the market made specifically for brick cleaning which work very well.

I am not sure what type of detergent tank you are using, but most chemical injectors will dilute the cleaning solution greatly. You usually need to use a concentrated cleaning solution so that it will not be too diluted coming down stream from the chemical injector.

The specs on the sprayer look OK: You should use a 415 or 517 tip with about 2000 - 2500 psi with most exterior latex paints. Be sure you are aware of how to use the airless before doing so. Familiarize yourself with how to release the pressure, how to unclog a clogged tip properly, and know that accidental injection from an airless sprayer is a serious injury that you must be cautious of.

Emulsabond is tricky to use in a one coat spray application, don't use it if you don't need to (i.e. if there is no chalk present).

You don't need a primer on aluminum siding that is clean, and previously painted in a flat finish. You will need to prime if the paint is glossy.

You will know if the previous paint is adhering well once you pressure wash the siding, if not, it will blast the weakly adhering paint off.

As you are probably aware of, there is a lot of direct masking off required when spraying aluminum siding. You will also need to be careful of paint drifting on to objects down wind (including the neighbors house and car etc...)

Flat paint is easy to use and spray on aluminum siding. Sheen paints require a little more spraying skill to avoid lapping and fogging.
 
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Old 05-21-09, 05:00 AM
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I've never had any issues with adding emulsa bond to paint. I do know that EB says on the label not to use with any paint that has a sheen but I've done so many times with no problems...... but I've got a lot of experience painting and Slatz may be right about it causing issues for a diyer.

I agree a 4/13 tip is kind of small for spraying exterior latex but before you buy a bigger tip, check the specs for your airless. At .2 gpm it might not be able to support a larger tip. The info with a pump usually states the biggest tip that can be used. I've never used an airless that small.

The TSP should do a good job of cleaning the siding - be sure to rinse well! Personally I think it is easier and more efficent to use a garden sprayer to apply the TSP and IMO it saves wear and tear on the PWer.
 
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Old 05-27-09, 02:01 PM
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Thanks for the advice. I started the cleaning process of the aluminum siding this weekend I took a garden sprayer with 1/2 cup of TSP, 2 gallons of warm water and added some bleach for good measure.

This stuff really seemed to loosen up the dirt! Immediately after spraying (with a garden sprayer) dirty water began to trickle down the siding. I then took a wand scrub brush with hose attachment to scrub and rinse the tsp off. I never allowed the tsp solution to dry.

How well do you have to rinse the TSP? I think that I have done a good job, but is there a way to be sure that all of the TSP has been rinsed?
 
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Old 05-27-09, 02:15 PM
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Another good tip is to always start at the bottom when washing and work your way up, this avoids having soap drip lines in the lower areas. Flood the area a couple times while wet, and the TSP will be gone.

Bill
 
 

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