Roller Marks? Yes. Anxiety? Oh yes.

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Old 05-28-09, 10:16 AM
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Roller Marks? Yes. Anxiety? Oh yes.

My husband and I recently rented a home in our area since we weren't planning on staying here very long. The walls were all hospital white when we rented the home and we were given permission to paint them. We had to, we have two small children and white walls would not have lasted a week.

Everything turned out fine except the living room. I used Olympic Satin in there since I liked one of their colors and was told it was trademarked. Roller marks could be seen when the paint hit the light in just the right way. When someone from the rental company came to inspect he was practically screaming at us, so my mother (a muralist) and her boyfriend (used to be a professional painter) came to help us redo it. My mother said to make sure the paint was blended well which we did, but another coat made little difference. I'm still seeing marks.

I cannot afford to keep doing this. It's driving me insane. Maybe if I didn't have an extremely rude individual breathing down my neck about it it would be easier, but I've got to figure out why this room is giving us so much trouble and the other rooms did not.

The roller marks are a bit better with the second coat, but in the light you can see what appear to be shinier areas and streaks. What do I do?

Edit: I just looked up roller marks on yahoo images, and mine do not look like most. Mine are not textured. I found a photo that looks identical to my current problem here:

IMG_1609 on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
 

Last edited by CGillingwater; 05-28-09 at 12:57 PM.
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  #2  
Old 05-28-09, 12:51 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Your roller marks are probably caused by a combination of low grade paint, cheap roller cover and poor rolling technique. It's also possible that the original roller marks are telegraphing thru the 2nd coat. Lighting and line of sight can cause defects to be more apparent in 1 room compared to another.

What size roller cover did you use? A 1/2" nap will probably work best although 3/8" may be ok. It might be a good idea to lightly sand the wall prior to the next coat. Ideally you would switch to a better grade of paint from a paint store. Big box paint dept tend to stock coatings based on cost not quality but you should be able to get a decent job with the paint you have. Do you have to have the paint job approved by a certain date? It might be more cost effective to wait until close to time to move out to repaint the said walls.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 01:07 PM
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We used a 3/8. I would have just layered as many coats as possible on the wall if there weren't that vaulted ceiling to worry about. It's so high that even on a 12 foot ladder it has to be painted by a brush tied to the end of a pole and carefully dipped in paint.

It's a nightmare.

The oddest part about this is that from the ceiling to about 9 feet off the floor there are no visible marks or streaks and everything looks fine. From the 9ft mark down is when the streaking and shading begins to appear. I'm hoping that we might be able to put yet another coat on that part and there wouldn't be a noticable difference.

Lowe's told me the paint color was trademarked. I wish that weren't the case because I'd love to be able to get a different paint for this, even though I was told the paint was high quality.

As for when it is supposed to be done...I thought I WAS done. I suggested just painting the walls back to their original color (primed and white) before we move out but they say that isn't good enough that it has to be completed and without streaks immediately.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 02:57 PM
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One thing I might add is that the sheen of the paint will have a major impact on the look of the job.
If you are using gloss or semi-gloss it could be a big part of your problem.

We have always used flat paint everywhere except kitchen and bathrooms and even with kids was not too bad to keep clean if we bought top of the line paint.
Flat also seems to touch up very well.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 05:30 PM
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Now there's a thought. We had been using satin because I was so worried I wouldn't be able to wipe it off. If I repainted with flat, do you think that would be better than repainting yet again with satin? Can I even layer flat paint on top of the satin that is already there or is that a bad idea?

Plus, which brand of paint would you recommend? I'm not sure what's considered "top of the line" these days.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 05:56 PM
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I have had no problem painting flat over any other sheen as long as it was properly prepaired.
I really am just a rank amateur and marksr would have a better idea about what paint to buy and maybe comment on the use of flat paint.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 06:13 PM
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i think the big box store is not telling you the truth about a trade
marked color. maybe the name is but not the color. ask them to computer match the color or try a "real hardware" store and ask to color match it to there brand of paint.

the marks maybe your stretching the paint and not reloading as often as you should. rule of thumb if you hear a suction sound when painting your stretching the paint. typical can of paint under ideal conditions is 400 square feet no more.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 07:37 PM
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Get yourself out of the Lowe's store, and go to an actual paint store, and bring your "trademarked" color with you. The bit about the color being trademarked is an absolute lie. The name might be, but the color itself is nothing more than a combination of pigments that reflect a certain set of wavelengths of light; it's not trademarkable. Any paint store will be able to match it.

Go to an actual paint store and purchase paint at or near the top of their line. (At Sherwin, this would be SuperPaint or Duration, at Ben Moore, Regal or Aura.) Apply it with a 3/8" Purdy White Dove affixed to a Wooster Sherlock frame.

Apply the paint by loading the roller, rolling a single 8-10' stripe, back rolling once or twice, re-rolling the previous stripe once or twice, reloading, and moving on. DO NOT push the roller against the wall, instead let the "flowing" property of the paint migrate from the roller to the wall. "Squeezing" the roller means guaranteed roller marks. Skip all the crazy W/M/N pattern stuff you may have seen on TV.

SirWired
 
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Old 05-29-09, 04:30 AM
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Thank you so much. So, I should get satin then?

I just have this fear about buying paint and having it matched. When I went to Lowe's to get another can of paint after using up two (on the bedrooms) they gave me the wrong shade and it ended up turning the walls half yellow/half orange. As you can imagine, I had a complete fit when I went back.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 05:11 AM
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That's part of the problem with big box paint depts. Generally the help at your local paint store is better trained. Since paint is all [or most] of what they sell, every employee knows how to mix and match paint. They also have the advantage of getting advice from all the pros that do business with their store. I've never had any issues with any paint store matching a competitors paint color.

Because you've painted everything else with the valspar, I'd probably stick with it - it will make touch ups simplier if needed later. Keeping the roller cover full of paint and using a light touch should elimate your problems. Don't try to stretch the area covered per roller full. 1 roller full of paint = 1 stripe on the wall. SirWired gave good instructions for using a roller..... although I'd probably use a 1/2" roller cover
 
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Old 06-01-09, 10:49 AM
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Couple of other tips here, try to do the work when the room is coolest, or use an airconditioner to cool the room, this will give you more working time. When you are rolling, be sure you are working away from the open end of the roller. I work right to left, so as I finish my work to the right, the open end of the roller is to the right. Sometimes if you don't use this approach, more force is put to the roller on the frame side, and thus the "railroad tracks" you are experiencing. I would also use both flat paint, and a 3/8" roller. If you go with any sheen, I would sand and prime the wall before continuing.

Bill
 
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Old 07-25-09, 08:53 PM
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I just wanted to reply since it was my image that was referenced in the original post. I used a dark navy paint in a satin finish by Valspar over flat wall paint (think contractor's grade crap, probably sprayed over the drywall without primer). The first coat covered the wall really well, surprisingly, but I was left with awful roller marks, despite laying it on pretty liberally. The second go-around, I moved the roller only in one direction - ceiling to floor - and lined up the edges so that they wouldn't overlap too much. This worked out perfectly for me! I think the combination of the satin paint, the dark color, and the light in the room all made the first-coat roller marks stick out. It's probably more the fault of the satin paint than anything else - the shinier finish makes any bump and imperfection in the wall stand out to begin with, so it makes sense that light reflecting off of paint laid down in a different direction would show up just as much as a bump. Just my $.02! The professional painters I hired to do pretty much the rest of the house later were really impressed that such a dark paint covered a white wall in two coats, so it's not super cheap paint. It's decent, thick, covers well, and has held up to a good deal of abuse already.
 
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