What does "keep the leading edge wet" mean?


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Old 06-02-09, 11:11 PM
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What does "keep the leading edge wet" mean?

Maybe a dumb question but I'm new to this and I'm getting ready to stain a deck. Can someone tell me what it means keep the leading edge wet? Thanks!
 
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Old 06-03-09, 04:17 AM
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There rarely are dumb questions.... but sometimes the answers

To prevent lap marks, you want the edge of what you have already painted/stained to be wet when you continue on. If the edge dries before you apply more paint/stain, you may end up with a lap mark because the dry edge got 2 coats instead of the 1 being applied. When staining a deck you need to take however many boards all the way across. Then when you stain the next board, try and keep the stain off of the board that is already done.
 
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Old 06-03-09, 01:25 PM
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With a roller, you can get the stain on quickly. While working in the shade, start with 4 boards and run them all the way across. If you see no problem, add a board or two. In no time you'll be finished.

Bill
 
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Old 06-03-09, 01:47 PM
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Thanks marksr. I will be using a wagner power painter to apply the stain. Hopefully it will be quick enough to get the entire floor of the deck done before any of it drys. I'll probably be using a semi-transparent water based stain. I don't know how quickly this drys.

Do I need to brush the stain in after it is sprayed on? If so, should I spray a few boards at a time then brush the stain in before it drys or does it stay wet for a while? Would it mess up the job if I had to walk on the deck with it being wet in order to go back and brush it all in? Hopefully I won't need to brush it in. That seems to defeat the purpose of using a sprayer.
 
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Old 06-03-09, 01:54 PM
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Unfortunately, the deck it not in any shade and there is always sun shining on it during the day. Will this be an issue?
 
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Old 06-03-09, 01:57 PM
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It's always best to back roll/brush the coating - it helps to work it into the substrate. I often spray, backroll and spray again. Using a roller pole [extension] should keep you from having to step in the wet stain.
 
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Old 06-03-09, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by jeff67 View Post
Hopefully I won't need to brush it in. That seems to defeat the purpose of using a sprayer.
Using a sprayer actually defeats the purpose of staining in the first place. The idea is to both preserve the wood by getting plenty on, and make a stable (non splinter) walking surface. Rolling on two coats in a two or three day period, in a 4-6 board sequence, early morning or early evening, back brushing only if necessary, if you have no shade to work in, would be my advice.
 
 

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