How soon after priming a surface do you have to paint it?

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Old 06-17-09, 03:28 AM
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Question How soon after priming a surface do you have to paint it?

The title basically says it all...

My question is mainly about the siding that I'm painting on my house. It's wood siding that I starting painting 3 years ago. At that time I applied one coat of latex primer and haven't gotten around to applying the actual paint yet. So, can I put the paint on this primer, or should I put on some new primer first?
 
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Old 06-17-09, 05:38 AM
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If the previous primer is clean and solid, you are all set. If however you see signs of it breaking down, which after three years with no top coat very well may happen, I would sand and reprime....

Bill
 
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Old 06-17-09, 05:59 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd inspect the primer closely!! Make sure the primer is still sound. If it's chalky, I'd wash it down and apply another coat of latex primer but with some emulsa bond added to it.
 
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Old 06-17-09, 12:01 PM
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There would have been something to debate had you been talking 30 - 60 days. Three years!!! You must start from scratch.
 
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Old 06-18-09, 07:28 PM
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Re-prime

Maybe if you were talking about an interior, I'd say you might be able to get away with it, but we're talking about three years of sun, wind, rain etc. Some primers have a sealing factor, but typically they're porous so the next layer can adhere. I would definitely re-prime it.
 
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Old 06-19-09, 06:57 AM
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If the previous primer is clean and solid, you are all set. If however you see signs of it breaking down, which after three years with no top coat very well may happen, I would sand and reprime....

Bill
 
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Old 06-20-09, 01:50 AM
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Thanks for the replies everyone. Looks like I'll be sanding and re-priming.
 
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Old 06-20-09, 07:34 AM
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Be sure to clean the old primer well before you put anything on it as primer is generally a very flat finish and flats tend to hold dirt.
 
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Old 06-24-09, 11:50 PM
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Yep...clean & re-prime



Agreed with recent replies!

30 days is usually the "Outer-Limits" for even Interior primers.

Many just get too dried-out/brittle to hold new paint decently.

>>> As Dvab said...you're back at "square 1" now.

Prime when surface is dried-out or de-dusted from any needed sanding after the re-cleaning.
>>> Get 2 full topcoats of paint on ASAP.
>>> Exterior surfaces start collecting dirt/dust/bugs the same day you clean them...

Faron
 
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