Paint Selection for Shelves

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  #1  
Old 08-18-09, 08:44 PM
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Paint Selection for Shelves

I apologize for the long post, but I hope it helps to describe my specific need.

I will be painting my kitchen cabinets, interior and exterior, and I am curious about which paints will work best.

I painted some built in shelves a few weeks ago, using 2 coats of Behr Latex semi-gloss, after sanding quickly to scuff the varnished shelved and applying some gripper primer.

It looks good, but when I stack magazines on it (after waiting for it to cure for over a week) I can still tell that the back covers of the magazines I stack in there start to stick when I pick up the stack the next day. For example I can hear it peel away when I lift the stack of magazines.

The paint seems to be gripping well, and looks good, but I am concerned about this, and about what I should do (or redo) here, and on the kitchen cabinets, which I had planned to do basically the same way.I am looking at semi-gloss for the exterior, but I wonder if it would be the right thing for the interior shelves based on my experience in the book case.

Or do I need to simply let the paint cure for more time. The humidity in my house is pretty controlled since I run a dehumidifier and air conditioning or I would think the humidity was too high for proper curing. I don't want to have to leave all of my items out of the kitchen cabinets for 2 weeks, unless it is really necessary.

Thanks for any guidance.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-18-09, 09:52 PM
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Sorry to tell ya this....

Buuuuut...
It's gonna take a MONTH for most Latexes to harden-off enough to be considered "cured"!

It's just the way it is...

It's just simply not a fast process for Latexes!

Faron
 
  #3  
Old 08-19-09, 05:26 AM
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... and some latex enamels never dry to a hard film. It would be better to use an oil base or waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 08-20-09, 06:46 AM
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Thanks for the input. I will look at using a water born enamel for the kitchen cabinets.

I'm actually glad that I have a known situation, and not one I caused by some mistake.

Does latex paint continue to cure even if covered lightly? Specifically, for my existing shelves, would it be detrimental to the curing process to place a few light items on the shelves?
 
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Old 08-20-09, 05:35 PM
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Light items may be ok. The sticking happens when the weight of the item presses into the paint. Generally the heavier the item, the more likely it is to stick. Often a light sanding followed by a coat of either oil base or waterborne enamel, 24-48 hrs drying time and no more problem
 
  #6  
Old 06-09-11, 07:44 PM
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So I'm building record shelves. Was planning on painting with latex. It sounds like that is NOT the way to go??!?!?

Please suggest alternatives! (All trim in room has already been painted with latex)...
 
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Old 06-10-11, 04:16 AM
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Not all latex enamels are created equal. The higher quality latex enamels are less likely to stick than their cheaper counterpart. That said, the only sure fire way to prevent the sticking is to either use an oil base or waterborne enamel.
 
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Old 06-10-11, 09:38 AM
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Afraid you'd say that. Shelves are going on top floor, where A/C is weakest and sun beats the begeezus out of the attic. Plus, it's Philly, so it's like 117% humidity. So latex curing could be years, it sounds like.


What cures fastest? (And how long is that - I have the records stacked in the bedroom!)

What smells least bad?

If I buy the same brand as I used for other trim, how close a match will I have? (It's base white, natch).


Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 06-10-11, 10:17 AM
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I'd highly recommend a waterborne enamel like SWP's proclassic waterborne. These waterborne enamels dry quick and develop a film almost as strong as oil base enamel does. It does have an odor but not a bad one like oil - it's similar to latex paint smell, just a little different. Waterborne enamel will be plenty hard with in 24-48 hrs drying time.

There may be a slight difference in both color and sheen providing you use the same brand..... but it shouldn't be noticeable.
 
  #10  
Old 06-10-11, 12:57 PM
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Writing this on board a 757, so excuse my lack of actual research...

Does Ben Moore make such a paint? And if not, would I see a big difference between semi gloss base whites?
 
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Old 06-10-11, 02:08 PM
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BM does have a waterborne enamel, I've not used it but I'm sure it's a quality enamel coating. There isn't an exact sheen level specified for semi-gloss [or any of the others] All of any one manufactures semi-gloss enamels will have a similar sheen but may vary by a few degrees. I don't think you'll notice a difference between items. You could probably paint the doors with one and the door casing with the other and not notice the difference. You would not be able to touch one up with the other without it showing.
 
  #12  
Old 06-10-11, 05:11 PM
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Thanks. (Just landed - crazy day in the skies).

I've always tried to use just two or three types of paint to reduce complexity at touch up time, so you hit the nail on the head there.

Thanks for the help.
 
  #13  
Old 06-11-11, 10:33 AM
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I know you don't like to pimp particular brands (I'm an MAB/Fuller O'Brien man myself, but the house was done in Ben Moore)... But is THIS the type of product you're suggesting?

(nb the link is for High-Gloss; they have an MSDS on the website for a Semi-, but it's not an easy link to post!)


Thanks!

rjb
 
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Old 06-11-11, 04:28 PM
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Yes, I believe that's BM's equivalent of SWP's proclassic waterborne.
 
  #15  
Old 06-28-11, 02:53 PM
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So first coat went on ten days ago, second coat last Tuesday. (Carpenter really liked using it, too.)

Put records back on shelves on Saturday. Will be home Friday again to see how much stuck to Who's Next or Lady Gaga. Hopefully none!

Thanks for the advice.
 
  #16  
Old 07-09-11, 11:42 AM
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Latex finishes curing takes about a month. Oil paint cures (oxidizes) basically forever. However, glossy latex is a bad choice for shelving because of the problem you mention, which will often continue even after the cure time.
 
  #17  
Old 07-09-11, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by rjbinney View Post
So I'm building record shelves. Was planning on painting with latex. It sounds like that is NOT the way to go??!?!?.
Correct, especially if you have valuable records. Use flat paint (will get marked and dirty over time), or oil/alkyd paint, or consider a melamine veneer. Or you can just buy premade melamine shelving and cut it to your correct size.
 
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