Stripping old paint and putting on new paint

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Old 08-22-09, 12:11 PM
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Stripping old paint and putting on new paint

I have a 2 car garage door that needs to be painted.
The paint looks like it has been there for many years and it is peeling away and looks terrrible.

I tried scrapping it off but there is so much to take off I assume I can use a paint stripper. What is the best kind of paint stripper for this? Also after I strip all the garage door paint, do I need to put one coat of primer on and then 2 coats of outdoor paint on my garage?
 
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Old 08-22-09, 12:50 PM
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Wow..thats gonna be a mess. Especially if you don't take down the panels. You'll need to use some sort of gel or paste so it doesn't run down.

One problem might be the panels..if it has panels of course. Many of them are not really wood..but more of a presswood or Masonite. They could be adversely affected by stripper.

I'd also be concerned about the affect of stripper on the joints, again, depending on the type of door.

So..is the door a section roll-up..or a single piece swing-up.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 01:59 PM
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Section roll up on a 1974 garage and not sure when or if it was ever repainted.
Not sure what type of wood.

I am only repainting the outside side of the garage.
Please advise.

Thanks.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 02:10 PM
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If its 35 y/o and not falling apart..I wouldn't put any chemicals on it. Its possible it is something like redwood or cedar. Most modern wood doors don't last 10 yrs w/o good maintenance.

I know it seems like a lot of work...but I'd scrape and sand to a reasonably good finish, then prime and paint. A good size paint scraper or 2, a couple of people, maye a random orbital or vibratory sander...you could have it prepped in one day.

I'd guess you may have an oil base paint on it...but I'm no paint expert. Can't tell you whether a latex or oil is best.

The site has been extremely slow..so I don't see many of the Pro's online..I'd give them time to respond as to the paint types.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 02:14 PM
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Thanks, good point and I am not sure if its the original door from 1974. I will check and see if I can rent a random orbital or vibratory sander at Home depot. I should probably be careful not to oversand and ruin the wood.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 02:33 PM
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No need to rent...
You can find one perfectly adequate for the job for $30-40. Less if you go a little cheap..but I don't on these kind of tools.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 04:09 PM
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I'd be leary of using a stripper on the door! Not sure that I'd use a pressure washer either. As mentioned above, scraping and sanding is the best way to prep the door.

Since you don't know how long since it's been painted, I'd recomend applying a full coat of oil base exterior wood primer on the door once your done sanding. It can be top coated with either latex or oil base. You should also paint the edges of the door - raise 1 panel at a time to expose the edge. Don't fully shut or open the door until these edges are dry.

If my memory is correct, about half of the wood garage doors from the 70's were wood and the other half masonite. Now almost all garage doors are metal which IMO is the best way to go when it comes to replacement time.
 
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Old 08-23-09, 08:12 AM
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Thanks, I assume I will only have to strip off the peeling paint areas which are only on the moulding part (the wooded parts that sticks out and seperates the panels)? The flat panels have no peeling paint and I should just clean that area with soap and then put primer on top of the flat panels before painting?
 
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Old 08-23-09, 09:31 AM
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After you've done your sanding I'd wash down the entire door with TSP,tri-sodium phosphate,available at most hardware and paint stores.This is a strong detergent commonly used for paint prep.If you think there is any mold on the door add a little bleach to the mix.then go behind this with clean water and thoroughly rinse and allow to completely dry.

Then prime as suggested etc.
 
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