painting base board & cabinets

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  #1  
Old 08-30-09, 12:43 PM
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painting base board & cabinets

hi all,
i'm planning to do 2 projects which are:

1. my contractor that did laminate didn't paint the base board before they install.
so i'm planning to do base board paint over the long weekend.
i'd like to know which brand should i pick for it. and right now its white base board from home depot non painted.

2. my cabinets had color before we moved in but we like to change it so we sanded and re-painted with Behr paint from home depot a year back and now its all coming off and wherever i touch the doors the paints are chipped off.
besides i feel sometimes if i leave something on it still sticks. not good quality paint i think. its BEHR ultra white paint.

i'd like recommendation for base board paints and how to do it.
also for the cabinets how should i approach from removing old paint and need good quality paints that don't chipped off or sticks.

would be really great to hear.
thanks so much.
 
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Old 08-31-09, 03:49 AM
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I mostly use the SWP brand of paints but most any paint store [not big box paint dept] will have quality paint - just be sure to use mid grade or better.

The base board won't have the problems associated with your cabinets although a quality enamel will always do better than a cheap enamel.

The #1 reason for interior paint to peel is improper prep and with stained/finished wood - failure to use the correct primer. I doubt there is any quick fix for your cabinets All or most of the peeling paint will need to be removed. This is best accomplished by using a paint stripper although I'd be leary of using a stripper on any laminated surfaces. Sanding is also an option. Start with coarse sandpaper maybe 80 grit and do the final sanding with 150-180 grit.

Here's some good info on repainting cabinets;
http://forum.doityourself.com/painti...t-repaint.html
 
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Old 08-31-09, 09:14 AM
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Marksr,
thanks for your great info.
i heard SWP are good paints.
but i'd like to which one should i use and this is white color for base board and cabinets.

would be gald to hear.

thanks for the link i'll follow that as well.
 
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Old 08-31-09, 10:20 AM
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Promar 200 line is decent [I wouldn't use 400 or 700] Super paint is better. I mostly use the proclassic waterborne [most expensive] it dries fast and hard like oil enamel but doesn't yellow like oil base enamel does.

Ben Moore has similiar coatings as do most paint stores unlike most big box paint depts.
 
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Old 08-31-09, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
Promar 200 line is decent [I wouldn't use 400 or 700] Super paint is better. I mostly use the proclassic waterborne [most expensive] it dries fast and hard like oil enamel but doesn't yellow like oil base enamel does.

Ben Moore has similiar coatings as do most paint stores unlike most big box paint depts.
thanks much.
did you mean promar 220 with super paint.... as i never bought SWP and i don't have experience.
i heard about waterborne in this forum as well.
so i can use promar 200 in baseboard & cabinets, correct.?
 
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Old 08-31-09, 04:26 PM
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Promar is SWP's contractor line. Promar 200 is the best quality in that line. It is the cheapest paint that I will use. It is better than what most builders use in new construction which is where I most often use it. So yes you can use promar 200 latex enamel although proclassic waterborne would be a lot better. I rarely ever use an interior enamel other than these two. Proclassic waterborne is SWP's most expensive residential coating but IMO it's worth the price.

Promar as noted is the contractor line, super paint is one of their better lines of paint with duration being their top line paint. The help at SWP can help you pick the best paint for both your job and budget. The same can be said for most any paint store but not most big box paint depts.
 
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Old 09-02-09, 10:07 PM
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marksr, thanks much.

i think i'd go with promar 200 for doors and baseboard.
and proclassic waterborne for cabinets. what do you think?

do i need to use primer in baseboard before i apply.
base board is brought from homedepot by those contractors it has white color on it seems primer to me.
would be great to hear.
 
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Old 09-03-09, 03:41 AM
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The factory primer on the baseboard doesn't have to be reprimed although it doesn't hurt. Expect to need 2 coats of enamel to get full coverage without repriming.

Do you know if the woodwork you are repainting is latex enamel? oil base enamels must either be repainted with oil enamel or sanded and primed with asolvent based primer before switching to latex.
 
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Old 09-03-09, 04:09 PM
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do you think i'll need double coat for baseboard?

also for doors i'm repainting over the old paint i guess i don't have to sand, right. these doors paint havn't chipped off but just to re-paint them.

yes it is latex enamel on all those cabinets.
so i guess just sand and prime then paint latex, right.

i'm heading to sherwin williams this weekend and starting my baseboard project.

thanks
 
  #10  
Old 09-04-09, 03:53 AM
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I've gotten coverage on preprimed base/casing with proclassic waterborne but not with promar 200 but ..... I've got years of painting experience - it will probably take 2 coats.

It is always best to sand before recoating enamel. If it's latex enamel, all you need is a quick scuff sand to promote adhession. Here's a link explaining how to find out what type of enamel is on your doors,
http://forum.doityourself.com/painti...latex-oil.html

It would be best to strip, prime and then repaint your cabinets. Just repainting will make them look nicer and will help to keep them from chipping but you would still have poorly adhered paint under your new paint - sooner or later it would chip/peel again
 
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Old 09-04-09, 07:51 AM
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Marksr, thanks for all your suggestions.
sorry i've to many questions as being newbie here.

-for Baseboard, seems you've more experiecence towards waterborne than promar 200 should i get waterborne, would be worth to use it in baseboad. if it looks nice and better certainly i'll use waterborne.

-for my existing colors on doors which are still good---can i use fine sand grit paper and scuff lightly and repaint it with waterborne.

-for cabinets certainly i've more work to follow your instructions which i'll do that.

my color all i used before was Latex i checked.
can i use gloss, would it come out better?
is waterborne latex or oil based or i can find in both?
if its in oil based would there something i've to do since i've latex paint.

sorry for all the questions.
thanks
 
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Old 09-04-09, 04:13 PM
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Ok let me try again almost done typing and my post and this site went bye bye

If your current paint is latex enamel, you can use waterborne, latex or oil base over it with no issues to speak of. I'm partial to the proclassic waterborne enamel both because of the great finish and the fact that I suffer from occupational overexposure to solvents. I've applied 100s of gallons of all the different enamels. Most all of them have their uses. Promar 200 latex enamel will give a nice job and might be a little easier for a diyer to apply. It just doesn't dry to as hard a finish as the waterborne does.

A scuff sand with 150-180 grit sandpaper should be fine. Most enamels come in 3 basic sheens; satin, semi-gloss and gloss. Higher sheens can make any defects more noticable but they can highlight the woodwork. The sheen is usually chosen based on personal preference.
 
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Old 09-09-09, 09:24 PM
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Marksr,
thanks for everything.
i think i'm pretty close to what i needed.
but i've another question.
these contractors who have worked on my floor laying the laminate....i saw there's some gap in between the floor and the door frames.
since i'm painting my doors what should i use to fill the gap?

also there's very tiny gap in between the laminate and base board?

but the door frames have more gaps due to previous carpet.

i guess before i paint i've to prep those gaps correct?

would be great to hear.
thanks so much.
 
  #14  
Old 09-10-09, 04:39 AM
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How big is the gap between the door jamb/casing and the flooring? If it isn't too big you can caulk it, other wise you might need to cut a piece of wood to match and slide it into place - a little bit of caulking applied before sliding it in should hold it place.

Caulking or shoe mould can be used along the baseboard although it might be a good idea to find out from the floor manufacture [installer may know] if it's ok to caulk that gap.
 
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Old 09-14-09, 08:55 AM
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Marksr,
finally picked up the color
proclassic waterborne extra white semi-gloss.
the price between promar and proclassic was like $6 difference.
so i rather picked up what you've recommended.

they were even recommending me "Duration" but i picked up waterborne.

question for you is i'm everything ready to paint my base board
i've to paint the straight line inbetween the wall and the top of the baseboard i just couldn't think of what brush should i use to make it line straight, would be glad to hear.

will be more questions down the road for you....hope you don't mind.
thanks for everything.

thanks
 
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Old 09-14-09, 03:26 PM
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I'd suggest a purdy 2" sash [angle] brush. The main thing is to use a quality synthetic brush. Even with all my painting experience, I'd have a hard time doing a good job with an inferior brush.

With only a $6 price difference - I bet the proclassic was on sale
 
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Old 09-16-09, 10:15 PM
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i got some question regarding cabinets.
i read the link regarding repaint cabinets.

which liquid should i use to clean the paints?
i've ryobi sander from my friend, can i use it to sand it and light sand?

also can i use smooth roller (sponge type) than bristle brush?

would be really great to hear.

thanks
 
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Old 09-17-09, 05:40 AM
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" which liquid should i use to clean the paints?"

Not sure I understand
Do you mean as in a liquid deglosser to wipe down the old/existing finish? Liquid Sandpaper is one such brand.
Or do you mean washing up the tools after using waterborne? soap and water will clean them up.

The sander should work fine [actually better than hand sanding] although there will be some areas that you will need to sand by hand Don't forget to remove the sanding dust.

I'm not overly fond of sponge roller covers but you should be able to get a decent job with one. For some diyers, a roller finish will look better than their brush finish. If I was to roll them, I'd probably use a 1/4" nap mohair roller cover - but it is considerably more expensive than a sponge cover. I would not use a natural bristle brush with waterborne paint because when you wash it up with water, the water will destroy the brush's usefullness For brushing you want a quality synthetic bristle like you would use for latex paint.
 
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Old 09-17-09, 09:16 AM
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sorry, i mean to wipe out the old existing paint before sanding.

i'll look for the roller that you've told me but i've used smooth roller that looked a lot better than brush for me. but i can check the one you recommended for me.

would purde bristle brush would be better to work with waterborne paint? ifnot what would be ur choice would be glad to hear.

thanks
 
  #20  
Old 09-17-09, 02:32 PM
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Bristle is what the working part of the brush is made of. There are basically 3 types of paint brushes, natural bristle [often hog hair] which is only for solvent based coatings, and nylon bristle or nylon/polyester blend which can be used for oil but are best suited for latex and waterborne coatings.

If you have had good results with a sponge roller cover, I see no need for you to change just because I'm not fond of them.
 
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Old 09-17-09, 02:53 PM
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Don't be tempted to buy a natural bristle brush for any paint with a water base as the bristles will absorb the water and give a lousy job.Always use a synthetic with water based paint.
 
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Old 09-17-09, 04:13 PM
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any particular solvent you recommend to clean up the existing paint?
and also primer.
thanks
 
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Old 09-17-09, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by cool View Post
any particular solvent you recommend to clean up the existing paint?
and also primer.
thanks
To clean the surface before painting you mean?You're painting kitchen cabinets?Might wipe them down with mineral spirits aka paint thinner (NOT remover) to remove grease from cooking,fingers etc.

From what I can see in this thread if you scuff sand any gloss and clean off the residue you won't need to prime.If you have staining that might bleed through paint or if some of this paint is oil based you would want to use a solvent based (oil based) stain blocking primer.
 
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Old 09-17-09, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by spdavid View Post
To clean the surface before painting you mean?You're painting kitchen cabinets?Might wipe them down with mineral spirits aka paint thinner (NOT remover) to remove grease from cooking,fingers etc.

From what I can see in this thread if you scuff sand any gloss and clean off the residue you won't need to prime.If you have staining that might bleed through paint or if some of this paint is oil based you would want to use a solvent based (oil based) stain blocking primer.
i'm repainting my kitchen and toilet cabinets. very few has grease on it. the problem was paints coming off.
i've followed repainting links that Marksr pointed me.
what i've understood is to clean the paint first with solvent?
then sand and prime, sand then first coat then sand and last coat.
so i was looking at what solvent to use to clean of the paints if i've to ifnot i can just sand it.
i got more confusion, sorry about that.

would be glad to hear.
thanks
 
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Old 09-18-09, 04:04 AM
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The main thing is top scrape off as much of the peeling paint as you can! Then you'll need to sand. From what I've read, the biggest issue with your cabinets is the peeling paint which was likely caused by failure to sand and use the correct primer before painting over the factory finish.

Liquid deglossers are often usefull when getting oil enamel finishes ready for repaint. Deglosser is harder to use over latex paints because it can disolve the latex paint. Unless you intend to completely strip your cabinets - scraping and sanding is your best bet.
 
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Old 09-18-09, 06:55 AM
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yes i'm thinking to scrap off all the paints.
can i find something like paint remover the better quality that can do the job easier.
also any primer that you recommend would be glad to hear.

thanks
 
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Old 09-18-09, 08:11 AM
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Paint remover removes everything down to the bare surface which is not what you want to do.You're just going to have to scrape and sand to do this job.

Any quality oil based primer will work for your project once you've removed all loose material from the surface and cleaned it to remove sanding and scraping residues and whatever cleaner you use be certain to remove residue from that too,probably with water.Another way to remove residues like that is a Tack Cloth,which is a sticky peice of cheesecloth made specifically for the purpose.
 
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Old 09-18-09, 12:44 PM
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thanks for the input.
but i'm bit confuse.
in this case i actually don't want to remove the paint completely off with the paint remover or other chemicals.
instead scrape the old paint completely and sand it.

and use Prime with a white-pigmented shellac based primer.

and follow as in the post, correct?

what do you mean by if i use paint remover it completely removes to the bare?

but for my door to re-paint which is fine now just scuff and paint on top of it.
am i right?
sorry for all the confusion.
glad to hear.
thanks
 
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Old 09-18-09, 02:02 PM
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Yes you are right.

Your last post asked about paint remover.Paint remover takes everything off.You do not want to use it.
 
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Old 09-18-09, 04:24 PM
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in that case,
is it easy to scrap off from the difficult areas completely?
 
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Old 09-18-09, 05:29 PM
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You can only find that out by trying,every situation is different.
 
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Old 09-19-09, 04:16 AM
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Diligently scrape off what you can and then sand. Sanding might reveal areas that need more scraping. While it's best to remove all of the paint that is subject to peeling, any paint that remains has adhered well enough to not fall off to this point and should be ok to prime and paint over. While priming and after it dries, keep an eye out for any paint that might be loose - the wet paint might cause some of the old paint to lift, but only if it isn't adhered well.
 
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Old 09-21-09, 09:26 AM
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thank you all.
finally project started with cabinets.
i'm following the procedure.
scrapping took too long but tried much i can and did sanding.

i'd ryobi sander which is too dusty and mess.
bought bosch orbital sander from Lowes and this is great.

but now question is i did rough my doors and i see some parts were colors chipped but not worse like cabinets.
should i just rough and put color is fine like two coats.
or should i prime while its rough and do fine sand and put two coats?

would be glad to hear.
thanks so much.
 
  #34  
Old 09-21-09, 02:19 PM
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How rough is it? It's ok to prime over the rough wood but when you use a finer grit sandpaper if it takes most of the primer off in order to get it smooth - then it's too rough. The primer will fill in some of the roughness, it's just hard to say without seeing.

It's always a good idea to sand both the primer and the 1st coat of enamel. That helps to eliminate any brush marks, roller stiple and all around gives a nicer finish.
 
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Old 09-24-09, 12:52 PM
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after primer how much sanding do i need to do.
just to make smooth surface.

is it same thing after first coat?

wondering what would be the easiest way to get around the frame of the doors to sand it? i guess i've to use sand paper or sand sponge, correct?

thanks so much.
 
  #36  
Old 09-24-09, 01:17 PM
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The primer may raise the grain some so you need to sand enough to get it all smooth. The 1st coat of enamel only needs a scuff sand..... unless you have any brush marks or boo-boos that need attention
 
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Old 09-25-09, 04:18 PM
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Marksr,
i did follow the steps that you've asked me.
but i'm wondering some cabinets and doors are not chipped off in that case can i just use to make it rough with 180grit paper instead taking off all the colors.
it would be the same color with same shin.

so far i've started with the one its chipped more and i took out almost 80% of the color and following the steps.
 
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Old 09-26-09, 05:44 AM
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It's hard to say. It isn't likely that the paint on those sections of the cabinet adhered any better than where the chipping has occured. Most likely, those areas just didn't recieve enough abuse to chip the paint.

That said, if you aggressively sand those areas [I'd start with 80-120 grit] and the paint is still adhered - it might be ok.You will need to resand with the 180 to grit rid of the sanding scratches but you could probably hold off and do that sanding after the primer is dry.
 
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Old 10-03-09, 04:39 PM
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thanks much.
so far coming good. still way to go...

but recently Sherwin Williams had onsale ....for greensure products for 25%.

while i'm using proclassic can i use "duration" or just stick with one to save?

ifnot i'm always fine with same one but just thought if i can save why not?

thanks
 
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Old 10-03-09, 05:36 PM
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I'm not sure if I understand what you are asking It's fairly normal to use one line of paint on the walls and another on the trim..... or do you mean use proclassic on some of the trim and duration on some??? It would be ok to do that although the 2 different finishes may not look the same - they'd probably be close, just not identical. While I usually used proclassic on the majority of the woodwork [new houses] I often substitued promar 200 latex enamel [same sheen] for the crown moulding. It saved me $ and didn't compromise the quality of the job
 
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