How to fix exterior thick peeled door?

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  #1  
Old 10-20-09, 08:20 PM
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How to fix exterior thick peeled door?

I have already scraped and sanded the exterior door. The scrapped paint is THICK.

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Is stripping the the whole door the best way to fix this?

Thanks
 
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Old 10-21-09, 04:41 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

What is the door made of? is it masonite?

Generally if a door has that much paint and some of it's peeling it's best to strip the door and start over. It's probably not a good idea to use a stripper on masonite. If you have a sander, start out with 60 grit and work your way up to 120 grit - that should remove a good portion of the paint and level it out enough to get a decent job. The only other option would be to smooth out the transition where the paint is peeling by using an exterior spackling.
 
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Old 10-21-09, 01:46 PM
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I'm not sure, its an old door. I just moved here about 5 years ago. I'm sure the door hasn't been changed before. House built in 1969.

Wouldnt exterior spackle not last more than 2 months in rain, sun?
 

Last edited by marksr; 10-24-09 at 03:12 AM. Reason: removed unneeded quote
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Old 10-22-09, 03:35 AM
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Regular spackling doesn't hold up real well outside but exterior spackling is formulated different. It should be primed and then 2 top coats of paint [oil primer is best] It should hold up ok. I'm not recomending this as the best fix, only that it's an option. Sanding is a better way to go.... and you would need to do a little sanding [maybe scraping too] prior to applying the spackle.

In your picture, is the peeled area down to the raw door? or is it brown paint that I'm seeing? Exterior masonite doors were used mostly in the late 70's and 80's but that's not to say they couldn't have been used at any time since they first came out. I don't know if they still make an exterior grade masonite door.
 
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Old 10-22-09, 01:46 PM
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Will this one do?
DAP 10226 SPACKLE PASTE INT/EXT.5P


There's peeled paint also on the door corners and The corners and side are warping. I think I should just replace the door.

I find that Nothing will last outdoors.
 

Last edited by marksr; 10-24-09 at 03:11 AM.
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Old 10-22-09, 04:53 PM
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If you replace the door, I'd recomend using a metal door but make sure that it will fit as it can't be trimmed easily like a wood door can.

I don't think I've used that particular spackling but it should be ok. It's important to use an oil base primer over it. The finish coat can be either oil or latex. The main thing is to limit how much spackling you use. You don't want to cover the door with it, just to soften the edge where the peeled and non peeled areas meet. Make sure that all the loose paint is removed! If any of the old paint peels, it may take the spackling with it
 
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Old 10-23-09, 09:19 PM
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Thanks,
Marksr

My other question is when brushing latex or oil
what is the best brush stroke technique? How can I have less brush strokes?
 

Last edited by marksr; 10-24-09 at 03:10 AM. Reason: removed unneeded quote
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Old 10-24-09, 03:07 AM
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That's a hard one to answer There are many factors involved. Using the right brush for the job at hand is one. While you would use a natural bristle brush for solvent base coatings, they can't be used with latex. A nylon, polyester [or blend] or some type of synthtic bristle is needed for latex paint. Sometimes it helps to thin the coating slightly. Normally it's best to avoid applying the paint in the sun as it can cause the coating to set up faster. Quality paints often brush and level out better than their cheaper counterpart. Quality brushes work better than the elcheapo's. You never want to overbrush - do a decent job of applying the paint and then let it finish leveling itself.... and practice and experience helps too
 
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Old 10-24-09, 09:44 PM
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In other words, it's a skill would be impossible to teach in one day? It would take years or training and practice. Is that what your saying? What size of brush would you use for doing cuts, baseboard, trims?
 

Last edited by marksr; 10-25-09 at 05:15 AM. Reason: removed quote - use post reply button when a quote isn't needed.
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Old 10-25-09, 05:13 AM
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It doesn't take years of practice although I have run across some folks that just couldn't master it The biggest thing that comes with practice is speed.

The size brushes I normally use;
siding - 4"-5"
trim and cut in - 3"
windows - 2.5" sash [angle] brush

Those are the brushes I use most although I'm sure I have more than a dozen of different type/size brushes. The typical diyer would want to use a smaller brush than a pro and other than brushing siding, would likely benfit from using a sash brush. Most diyers do best with a 2"-2.5 brush. A small roller can also be helpfull for large flat surfaces. Many will roll a door and then [while the paint is wet/fresh] take a brush and lightly 'tip' out the paint. That helps to remove the roller stipple. Some will elect to leave the roller stipple - it can look better than a poorly one brush job.

You can almost always straighten out a bad paint job. It might require sanding and applying another coat but once you get done - you have bragging rites!
 
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Old 10-25-09, 04:38 PM
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I appreciate you for answering all my question.


It doesn't take years of practice although I have run across some folks that just couldn't master it The biggest thing that comes with practice is speed.
Clean and speed.


The size brushes I normally use;
siding - 4"-5"
trim and cut in - 3"
windows - 2.5" sash [angle] brush
Sorry I'm still learning.

What is the difference between using
Sash, Angle, and Trim Brush?

A small roller can also be helpfull for large flat surfaces. Many will roll a door and then [while the paint is wet/fresh] take a brush and lightly 'tip' out the paint. That helps to remove the roller stipple. Some will elect to leave the roller stipple - it can look better than a poorly one brush job.
Like what Prowallguy is doing?
YouTube - painting a 6-panel door
 
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Old 10-26-09, 04:01 AM
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A sash and angle brush is the same thing, sash is the proper name and angle is what some call it because of how it's shaped. There isn't a specfic brush called a trim brush but some will use the term for the brush they use on trim work - normally smaller than a brush used on an open wall [or whatever]

"Like what Prowallguy is doing?" - yes
 
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