zinc coated hinges

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Old 01-15-10, 10:14 AM
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zinc coated hinges

I have quite a few brand new zinc-coated strap hinges (not galvanized but the less-expensive what's called zinc coated type) that will end up being used outdoors under a protected eave so not right directly in the rain. But still they'll be outdoors so I'd like to know what would be a recommended method of protecting these in advance, some type of spray-on protectant stuff or primer/paint or what. Of course, because they're hinges I don't want to get a lot of paint where the hinge operation would get sticky etc.
thanks for any comments/advice
 
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Old 01-15-10, 02:36 PM
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No matter what you do these hinges will rust so all you can do is slow and control the process not stop it.

Assuming these will be attahced to areas of trim,you can use oil based primer followed by enamel trim paint.The best primer would be specifically for clean,not rusted,metal however oil based exterior primer would work.The top coat of enamel could be the same paint as your trim provided the quality is upper level.

If you repaint fairly regularly you can redo these hinges with the repaints otherwise you may need to address them as needed over the years with scraping repriming and repainting is they start showing rust.

If you can afford it use stainless screws.Screws will rust faster than the hinges.
 
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Old 01-15-10, 03:10 PM
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Okay thanks spdavid. These hinges will be on semi-permanent wooden window shutters for a shed type structure, the shutters probably removed seasonally. I'll use a spray can of Rust-oleum brand clean metal primer first, followed by either Rust-oleum spray paint or Fuller O'brien Epoxy (spray) paint. And I'll be sure to use some stainless screws. Which paint out of the two mentioned might you recommend for this application?
 
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Old 01-16-10, 09:34 AM
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I don't have any experience with the Fuller product but Rust-Oleum is a quality product line and should work fine.

If you are going to remove and reattach these shutters yearly or seasonally you might want to use nuts and bolts to attach the shutters to the hinges and then remove them from the hinges as repeated use of screws in wood will eventually wallow out the screw holes.Everything you'd need is available in SS and you could use wing nuts versus regular hex nuts for ease of use and they too are available in SS.
 
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Old 01-16-10, 10:48 AM
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Okay will go with the Rust-Oleum. Glad to hear your suggestion of using SS nuts and bolts to attach the shutters, because that's what I'd already planned! Didn't think about using wing nuts, that's a good idea. Thanks
 
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Old 01-16-10, 12:15 PM
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Rust-oleum normally has a long dry time..so plan carefully. It won't dry nearly as quickly as Krylon or auto touch up paint. Just lettin ya know.
 
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Old 01-16-10, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Rust-oleum normally has a long dry time...
That's what I'm finding out. I laid out the hinges on a piece of cardboard quite some time ago (three or four hours) and sprayed one side so far. I was hoping by now to flip em over and spray the other side but was kind of surprised to see the paint is still tacky. And this is in a warm shop without much humidity and good ventilation. Oh well, gotta wait then. Hurry up and wait, as they say...Beer 4U2
 
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Old 01-16-10, 12:36 PM
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Yep...chk the can...think they say 24 hrs? Don't have a can here to check...
 
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Old 01-16-10, 12:55 PM
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Actually this particular spray can of Rust-Oleum can does not say specifically anything about drying time at all, as you might expect, but, really, it doesn't. It does say "recoat time within 1 hour or after 48 hours" but I'm only planning on one coat anyway.

I checked a different spray can of Rust-oleum I have, maybe a newer can, anyway it's labeled as "Premium" and I notice it says "dry to the touch in 2-4 hours, to handle in 5-9 hours, and is fully dry in 27 hours at 70 degrees and 50% relative humidity. "
 
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Old 01-16-10, 01:21 PM
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Yeah...the recoat is a good indication..it won't fully cure probably until at least that long. I've had the same issue..thats why I said..ya gotta plan.
 
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Old 01-16-10, 01:56 PM
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Actually I misquoted/mistyped in my last post saying 27 hours. It says 48 hours, not 27 (don't know how I typed that)..

Yup, okay, with Rust-oleum I gotta plan. It should say that on the can. "IMPORTANT: Plan to wait a lot longer than you might expect for this paint to dry."
 
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