Equipment For Spraying Latex


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Old 01-17-10, 11:32 AM
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Equipment For Spraying Latex

I'm looking for an economical way to spray paint remote control airplanes with latex. Has anyone tried this Earlex HVLP system which sells for around $130, or anything similiar? I've tried foam brushing the latex and wasn't happy with the finish even with thinning the paint. The plane has a 100" wing span. I'm trying to stay away from compressor systems because of the noise since we live in a four unit building, however we do have an attached garage.



Chuck
 

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Old 01-17-10, 12:03 PM
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Welcome to the forums Chuck!

While I've got a bit of spraying experience, I've never used a true HVLP It should work well for spraying small items although latex paint may need to be thinned quite a bit to get it to spray properly = may need more coats and runs could be a problem if you tried to rush it.
 
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Old 01-18-10, 01:31 PM
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I use both airless and HVLP spraying systems.

HVLP sprayers do not spray latex paints very well as a rule. You will need to thin the paint to spray them too. The cheaper the unit - the weaker the air flow/volume will be, and the less likely to get a good job (using latex). HVLPs on the other hand, spray thinner materials like shellac, lacquer, clears and oil very well.

Airless sprayers will do a good job with latex, but the standard airless rigs are an over-kill for what you are doing.

The electric airless cup gun sprayers (Wagner Power Painters etc...) may be the best thing for what you are doing. The newer models have better atomization and hide than the older versions. They do make some noise though.

If you want a cheaper, quiet method of painting that will do a good job, try using one of the dense foam mini rollers (see Wooster) with one of the new waterborne latex enamels (see Sherwin Williams ProClassic for example). You will get a sprayed on look without any noise from a compressor or airless unit, and it's cheaper too. You will not have any dry spray, fogging, thinning or overspray issues to be concerned with either.

BTW, the foam brushes are not good application tools for a quality finish. You would get a better finish with a Purdy brush or something similar, with a good leveling enamel. The dense foam rollers will do even better than a good brush though if you are looking for a sprayed on look.
 

Last edited by Slatz; 01-18-10 at 01:54 PM.
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Old 01-18-10, 10:45 PM
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Thanks for the feedback.

Slatz,

I'll have to look into your recommendations, some good ones there. BTW, the best results I've gotten so far were with Benjamin Moore exterior latex, thinned 20% with water, using a small dense foam roller. I had to apply the paint extremely thin, and back brush it with a Purdy brush. I'm not in town now, but want to try it unthinned with the roller, and back brushing.

Chuck
 
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Old 01-19-10, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Slatz View Post
I use both airless and HVLP spraying systems.

HVLP sprayers do not spray latex paints very well as a rule. You will need to thin the paint to spray them too. The cheaper the unit - the weaker the air flow/volume will be, and the less likely to get a good job (using latex). HVLPs on the other hand, spray thinner materials like shellac, lacquer, clears and oil very well.

Airless sprayers will do a good job with latex, but the standard airless rigs are an over-kill for what you are doing.

The electric airless cup gun sprayers (Wagner Power Painters etc...) may be the best thing for what you are doing. The newer models have better atomization and hide than the older versions. They do make some noise though.

If you want a cheaper, quiet method of painting that will do a good job, try using one of the dense foam mini rollers (see Wooster) with one of the new waterborne latex enamels (see Sherwin Williams ProClassic for example). You will get a sprayed on look without any noise from a compressor or airless unit, and it's cheaper too. You will not have any dry spray, fogging, thinning or overspray issues to be concerned with either.

BTW, the foam brushes are not good application tools for a quality finish. You would get a better finish with a Purdy brush or something similar, with a good leveling enamel. The dense foam rollers will do even better than a good brush though if you are looking for a sprayed on look.
I looked at reviews on some of the Wagner airless sprayers and they weren't very good. Is there a better brand? Any comments on either of these waterborn enamels? Any input would be appreciated.

Waterborne Satin Impervo 314

Sherwin-Williams: ProClassic Interior Acrylic Latex

Chuck
 
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Old 01-20-10, 04:23 AM
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I've used a lot of SWP's proclassic waterborne and can highly recommend it. I've not used the impervo waterborne but BM's impervo line of enamels has always been top notch.

How big are the RC planes? I'd suspect that an airless would be too big to spray them. Graco has always been the industry leader when it comes to airless equipment. Titan [I own 2] and Spray Tech are also good brands. A piston pump is always preferable over a diaphragm pump.
 
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Old 01-20-10, 02:41 PM
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Both ProClassic and Waterborne Impervo level nicely. ProClassic is a bit stiffer to apply and you have to get used to that. Impervo is more "fluid" and has the feel of a "regular" latex. I think ProClassic levels better, but they are close. Muralo's Ultra is another very good leveling waterborne enamel.

I don't think other brands of airless cup guns will be materially different in terms of quality from the Wagner brand.

You will not have "smooth sailing" with anything less than a full airless, when it comes to spraying latex paint. You are going to have to thin the paint, add Floetrol, apply multiple coats with either HVLP or the airless cup guns.

I have both, by the way.

In fact I own three piston airless rigs (Graco), one diaphram airless rig (Campbell Hausfeld), a couple of HVLP systems (Capspray and Wagner), and have had a couple of the Wagner cup guns.

I am familiar with the issues associated with spraying with any of the above sprayer types.

I am not saying that the airless cup gun is the optimal way to spray latex paint. If you want a "no fuss" method of spraying latex paint, the airless rig is the way to go. Period.

Maybe, renting a airless rig is a viable solution here, in terms of cost. If you do rent (or buy for that matter) an airless rig, please read and familiarize yourself with the operating instructions. You must know how to de-pressurize the unit safely, and as with all airless sprayers (Wagner cup guns included), you must be aware of spray injection injuries and how to avoid them.

Both the HVLP and the airless cup guns are going to have a hard time atomizing the latex paint. I think the airless cup gun will do better job atomizing the paint than a cheaper HVLP though. The airless cup gun is also about half the price of the HVLP, but on the other hand, HVLP sprayers are safer to use.....

So now back to the dense foam roller and the good leveling paint (either ProClassic or waterborne Impervo will do), I think this may be the best way considering the other options. There is little risk in buying a roller and a quart of the paint and practicing on a piece of illustration board to see if you can get the knack for rolling out a fine finish. I have used the dense roller and ProClassic many-a-time in lieu of spraying.
 
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Old 01-20-10, 11:54 PM
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Slatz,

Thanks again for the feedback. I'm going to do exactly what you said below before I spend any money on sprayers. I'll get some feedback out next week.

"So now back to the dense foam roller and the good leveling paint (either ProClassic or waterborne Impervo will do), I think this may be the best way considering the other options. There is little risk in buying a roller and a quart of the paint and practicing on a piece of illustration board to see if you can get the knack for rolling out a fine finish. I have used the dense roller and ProClassic many-a-time in lieu of spraying."

Chuck
 
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Old 01-22-10, 11:38 PM
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I was doing a little more reading today and came up with a couple of more questions.

1. Are the waterborne enamels brittle? The remote control airplane I'm painting does see some flexing when it is flying and could cause some paint cracking if is too brittle. Regular latex is not an issue, lots of people use it on their planes.

2. How long after painting before you can mask the paint for putting on trim colors? A couple of days is no issue, a month would be.

Thanks again for the help.

Chuck
 
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Old 01-23-10, 05:32 AM
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#1 - it might be. Waterborne dries to a hard film like oil base does. Latex paints tend to be more flexible.

#2 - next day works well with waterborne and oil base. Latex enamels can be tricky as their drying/curing times vary. Some [usually the cheaper] latex enamels never dry to a hard film. Some can take up to a few weeks to cure. I'd be leary of using tape on any latex enamel that hasn't had a few days of drying time. A low tac tape would be better to use than the normal painter's tape. It's also best to not leave the tape on any longer than necessary.
 
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Old 02-05-10, 02:53 PM
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I've been trying the SW latex enamel and have not been having the success it'd like. The finish is not very smooth, the paint doesn't seem to flow out level for me, it's sort of dimpled. Based on what I've read here and other forums, I don't feel my technic is up to par. I'm experimenting with both 4" wide foam roller about 1" in diameter and a 4" roller with a 1/4" nap. I'm rolling slowly, and going back and forth until the surface is covered. The paint seems like it is going on pretty heavy and two coats give complete coverage.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Chuck
 
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Old 02-05-10, 03:31 PM
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1" nap is a little heavy but 1/4" is almost too short [hard to keep it loaded with paint] Paint additive like flood's floetrol and XIM's extender help latex paints to dry slower and flow better. I'd try sanding it smooth and then thin the next coat down with a little water [10% or less] and see how that works for you.
 
 

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