what goes over what?


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Old 01-24-10, 03:47 PM
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Unhappy what goes over what?

Can you paint over exterior oil based primer with latex paint?
 
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Old 01-25-10, 03:47 AM
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yes, that will not be a problem.
 
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Old 01-25-10, 04:28 AM
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In many situations, an oil base primer is preferred under a latex top coat.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 01-28-10, 07:56 AM
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can I paint over the existing mistake

new here and not sure if Im in the right place for this question, but any way will give it a try and hope I can get a good answer to this question.
I want to paint a kitchen and the existing surfaces in the kitchen were not applied properly, they applied a semi gloss or it could be a gloss, but most likely a semi gloss paint to another gloss surface. My question is, can I prime and paint this surface without having to remove this existing surface ? here is some additional information about the existing surface and that is, there are some light scratches , but no peeling or bubbling of any kind on any of the surfaces.
thank you for response.
lilacsforever
 
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Old 01-28-10, 09:08 AM
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Welcome to the forums lilacsforever!

We need some more info. What wasn't done correctly with the current paint job? what surfaces are we talking about?

Generally there is no need to prime when doing an interior repaint. Latex enamel can be painted over latex enamel with no issues, oil base enamel will adhere to both oil base and latex enamel. If you switch from oil enamel to latex enamel, the oil enamel should be scuff sanded and then a solvent based primer applied - oil enamel, latex enamel and waterborne enamel will all adhere great to solvent based primers.

The only time you need to remove the existing paint is when it's not bonded to the paint/substrate below it. A scuff sanding prior to painting is always a good idea. Also any excess grime/oils should be cleaned off and the cleaner residue rinsed.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 11:56 AM
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painting

marksr, oh, we were told that we should be priming when applying semi or gloss paint over another semi or gloss paint hmm, , its a home moving into and dont know previous owners and so dont know what they used for kitchen . while priming last night and after we finished the unhung cabinet doors with primer. did them per recommendation at dept. store, there was no problem and the paint stuck very well. But when we started to prime the walls in the kitchen, I accidentally touched a wall the same black trim that was on the cabinets and it , the black underneath the primer pulled away from the wall. the primer was still wet and we thought well we'll peel it off, but not so easy and so just primered again over it. what Im afraid of is the cabinets and what caused this black paint underneath our primer to pull away from wall. the primer were using is water based kiltz.
 
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Old 01-28-10, 03:19 PM
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As stated earlier, primers aren't often needed on interior repaints.... but to their credit, the primer manufactures do a good marketing job

Let's see if I understand correctly, the cabinets were painted black at some point and the paint over the black is peeling?
Probably what happened is the black was an oil base enamel and someone painted over that enamel with a latex paint/primer which didn't adhere well. When you applied primer, it helped to loosen the poor bond the previous latex had causing it to peel.

This can be a difficult problem to correct. Ideally you would remove all the paint and start over but that's a lot of work You might try some aggressive sanding, then prime and sand again. Hopefully that will work with no further issues.

http://forum.doityourself.com/painti...latex-oil.html
 
 

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